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Who Shot JR Who shot J.R.? was a mass media-manufactured open question in 1980. In the CBS television series Dallas, the character of J.R. Ewing, played by Larry Hagman, was shot by an unknown assailant in the final scene of its 1979-1980 season, which aired on March 21, 1980 and was entitled A House Divided. Viewers had to wait all summer, and most of the fall due to a Hollywood actors' strike, to learn whether J.R. would survive, and which of his many enemies was responsible. Security was tightened at the Lorimar studios where Dallas was filmed. During the summer of 1980, the question "Who shot J.R.?" was asked in everyday conversations across America and worldwide. T-shirts printed with such references as "Who Shot J.R.?" and "I Shot J.R.!" became common over the summer. Betting parlors worldwide took in massive amounts of money. People were placing bets as to which one of the 10 or so principal characters had actually pulled the trigger that shot J.R. A session of the Turkish parliament was suspended to allow legislators a chance to get home in time to view the Dallas episode. Ultimately, the person who pulled the trigger was revealed to be the character of Kristin Shepard (played by Mary Crosby) in the "Who Done It?" episode which aired on November 21, 1980. Kristin was J.R.'s scheming sister-in-law and mistress, who shot him in a fit of anger.
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Added: 5th July 2007
Views: 4320
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Posted By: BKV
Louis vs Galento 1939 On June 28, 1939 Joe Louis defended his world heavyweight title aginst Tony Galento. Two-Ton Tony was a 9-1 betting underdog--for good reason. His physique was more suited to a pie-eating champion than a heavyweight boxing contender. He had a pretty decent left hook and not much else. Nevertheless, Tony put up a decent showing against Louis. Galento even managed to score a flash knockdown in the third round before he himself was knocked out in round four.
Tags: Joe  Louis  Tony  Galento  boxing 
Added: 10th January 2008
Views: 1761
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Posted By: Lava1964
2002 Breeders Cup Betting Scandal On October 26, 2002, Christopher Harn and two buddies masterminded one of the most talked about betting scandals ever. The annual Breeders Cup races are often called the Super Bowl of horse racing. Six races are run. The popular Pick Six wager requires a bettor to select the winners of all six races prior to the first race being run. The payoff can be enormous if anyone achieves the feat. As an employee of the computer company that handled off-track betting, Harn used his technical know-how to attempt to beat the system. On Breeders Cup day he placed a routine bet using a friend's off-track account. Then, after four races had been run, Harn took advantage of his knowledge of when the results were transmitted. Harn went to his office and altered his friend's original bet to give him the first four winners of the Pick Six. Then he 'boxed' the last two races, ensuring a winning ticket regardless of which horses happened to win the last two races. The payoff was an astounding $3 million. Unfortunately for Harn, the payoff was too rich for his own good. The bet was immediately flagged as suspicious because of the odd betting sequence and because too many longshots had won that day. Eventually investigators pried a confession out of Harn and his co-conspirators. They were convicted of fraud.
Tags: 2002  Breeders  Cup  scandal  betting  horse  racing 
Added: 17th January 2009
Views: 2120
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Posted By: Lava1964
Football Point Spreads Invented During the football season, millions of dollars are bet legally and illegally every weekend on college and pro games. This is largely due to the system of point spreads. The invention of this new form of wagering occurred in the 1930s and is generally credited to Charlie McNeil, a Chicago stockbroker. Before the advent of point spreads, few people bet on football. Because most games had predictable outcomes and wagers could only be placed on outright wins, few gamblers bothered. (Why bet on a 15-1 longshot that wasn't likely to win?) Bookies were also reluctant to accept bets on overwhelming favorites or risk huge losses on upsets. McNeil's point spread system made football betting much more attractive by statistically levelling the playing field. Now favorites had to win by certain amounts for bettors to win. It also guaranteed a more equitable distribution of bets on each team, pleasing bookies and legal gaming establishments who make their profits largely on commissions.
Tags: football  point  spreads  gambling 
Added: 27th October 2009
Views: 1205
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Posted By: Lava1964
Radio Broadcast of Clay-Liston Bout This is something you may never have heard before: the ABC Radio broadcast of the first round of the historic Cassius Clay-Sonny Liston world heavyweight championship fight from Miami Beach on February 25, 1964. It has been superimposed onto the fight film. The broadcast team was Howard Cosell (providing color) and Les Keiter (calling the fight). Liston was a huge 7-1 betting favorite, and understandably so. He won the world title by destroying Floyd Patterson in less than one round in 1962 and beat Patterson just as easily in the return bout in 1963. Clay, at age 22, was thought to be no match for the fearsome Liston despite his cocky prefight antics. Most fans expected an easy Liston victory. Watch, though, as Clay changes boxing history in the first round with his deft ring movement.
Tags: Cassius  Clay  Sonny  Liston  boxing  radio 
Added: 13th October 2012
Views: 2978
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Davey - Boxings First TV Creation Chuck Davey, a slick left-handed boxer from Detroit who earned two degrees from Michigan State University, was the sport's first "television creation" in the early 1950s. Davey traveled to London as a member of the 1948 U.S. Olympic boxing team as an alternate but never competed in the Games. He turned pro in the late 1940s. At a time when boxing was hugely popular and it was possible to watch live televised pro bouts six nights per week, Chuck Davey fit the bill perfectly. He was good-looking, intelligent, popular enough be be pictured twice on the cover of The Ring magazine, and talented enough to win, but he possessed feather fists so his bouts often went the distance or close to it. (This pleased the networks and their sponsors as all the scheduled commercial breaks would be attained.) Over the years the quality of Davey's opposition has been questioned--and he certainly fought his share of tomato cans--but Davey did beat capable fighters such as Ike Williams, Carmen Basilio, and Rocky Graziano in his ascension up the ladder. After compiling 37 wins and two draws in his first 39 fights, Davey earned a shot at Kid Gavilan's world welterweight crown on February 11, 1953 in Chicago. Gavilan, who entered the ring as a 14-5 betting favorite, realized quickly that Davey had no ability to hurt him, so he just methodically wore Davey down. In the third round a flurry of punches knocked Davey down for the first time in his career. Over the next few rounds Gavilan toyed with Davey, occasionally switching to a southpaw stance just for the fun of it. In the ninth round, Gavilan floored Davey three more times. The fight was stopped by Davey's corner before round 10. Davey was pretty much discredited as a title threat after the bad loss to Gavilan. At one point he lost four out of five fights. He won two bouts in 1955 and then retired with an overall pro record of 42-5-2 with 26 knockouts. In 1998, Davey was paralyzed in a swimming mishap when a large ocean wave violently slammed him onto a beach. Davey died in 2002 at age 77.
Tags: boxing  Chuck  Davey  TV 
Added: 28th June 2015
Views: 1264
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Posted By: Lava1964

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