Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Tinker to Evers to Chance Back in the day when sports writing was at its gaudy peak, scribes often used poetry in their description of people and events. The most famous sports poem is likely this one penned by Franklin P. Adams: These are the saddest of possible words: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds, Tinker and Evers and Chance. Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble, Making a Giant hit into a double Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble: 'Tinker to Evers to Chance.' This work was first published as 'That Double Play Again' in the July 12, 1910, New York Evening Mail. The Chicago Daily Tribune reprinted it as 'Gotham's Woe' on July 15, 1910. Three days later, on July 18, the New York Evening Mail republished it under the title by which it is best known today, 'Baseball's Sad Lexicon.' It described the double-play artistry of Chicago Cubs when the team was in its heyday in the first decade of the 20th century. (Yes, the Cubs actually had a heyday.) Second baseman Joe Tinker, shortstop Johnny Evers, and first baseman Frank Chance first played together in 1902. Although the poetic lament was accurate, the Cubs' famed trio never came close to leading the National League in double plays at any time. Nevertheless all three were inducted into the Hall of fame in 1946 largely because of Franklin Adams' doggerel. Based on sheer statistics, probably only Frank Chance deserves to be there. Although all three ballplayers are long dead, their double play prowess has been referenced in numerous literary works, movies, and TV shows as varied as Hogan's Heroes and The Brady Bunch.
Tags: baseball  Tinker  Evers  Chance  Chicago  Cubs 
Added: 4th January 2011
Views: 2061
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
John Banner Here's a face that fans of 1960s TV can't forget: John Banner who played the bumbling and thoroughly lovable Sgt. Hans Schultz on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971. Apart from his steady role on Hogan's Heroes, the Austrian-born Banner made over 70 other television appearances between 1950 and 1972, including roles on Mister Ed, The Lucy Show, Perry Mason, The Partridge Family, The Untouchables, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E. In a 1954 episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Banner and Werner Klemperer--who would later be cast as Colonel Klink in Hogan's Heroes--both had roles. Banner, a Jew, was on tour with an acting troupe in Switzerland when the Nazis occupied Austria in 1938. Banner opted to emigrate to the United States and continue his acting career there. By the 1960s, the once lean Banner's weight had increased to 280 pounds. This helped gain him the part of the kindly inept German POW camp guard in Hogan's Heroes. The gentle Banner was loved not only by the viewers, but by the show's other cast members too. Banner defended his character, telling TV Guide in 1967: 'Schultz is not a Nazi. I see Schultz as the representative of some kind of goodness in any generation.' After Hogan's Heroes was cancelled in 1971, Banner starred as the inept gangster Uncle Latzi in the short-lived television sitcom, The Chicago Teddy Bears. His last acting appearance was in the March 7, 1972 episode of The Partridge Family. He then retired to his native Vienna. There he died suddenly of an aneurysm on his 63rd birthday on January 28, 1973.
Tags: TV  John  Banner  Hogan 
Added: 29th January 2011
Views: 1963
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Edwin Bear- Last Song Tags: Edwin  Bear-  Last  Song  1973  70s  1970s  One  Hit  Wonder 
Added: 4th February 2011
Views: 1731
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden
Mary Tyler Moore Statue In May 2002, actress Mary Tyler Moore was present as cable TV network TV Land dedicated a statue in downtown Minneapolis to the television character she made famous in the sitcom that bears her name. The bronze statue is located in front of the Macy's department store, near the corner of 7th Street and Nicollet Mall. (It was a Dayton's Department Store at the time of the dedication.) The statue depicts the iconic moment in the show's opening credits where Mary gleefully tosses her tam o'shanter into the air in a freeze-frame at the end of the montage. The message on the statue asks, 'Who can turn the world on with her smile?' Mary, of course!
Tags: Mary  Tyler  Moore  statue  Minneapolis     
Added: 3rd March 2011
Views: 1577
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Offensive Words Expunged From Scrabble Dictionary In 1993, Judith Grad, a kitchen-table Scrabble enthusiast was horrified to discover that the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary (OSPD) contained racial, religious, and ethnic slurs along with common vulgarities and obscenities. She wrote letters of complaint to Hasbro (the company that owns Scrabble) and Merriam-Webster, the publisher of OSPD. The general response was that although some words were certainly offensive, they were still words that could be found in any collegiate-level dictionary. Moreover, their meanings were irrelevant to the game. Unsatisfied, Grad contacted the Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai Brith, the NAACP, and the Zionist Organization of America. That, combined with a letter-writing campaign organized by the National Council of Jewish Women, brought the 'offensive word issue' some mainstream publicity. Without consulting Merriam-Webster or the National Scrabble Association (NSA), Hasbro chairman Alan Hassenfeld, in a knee-jerk reaction, announced that '50 to 100 words' would be expunged when the next edition of OSPD was published. Predictably, serious tournament Scrabble players went nuts, accusing Hasbro of caving into censorship, political correctness and the 'language police.' A petition bearing the signatures of more than 800 tournament players was presented to Hasbro demanding Hassenfeld's decision be reversed. At the 1994 U.S. National Scrabble Championship in Los Angeles, an angry mob of more than 200 players vociferously declared their opposition to any expurgation and vowed to quit the game or even sue the NSA if any words were removed from the lists because of political correctness. An acceptable compromise was reached: Starting in 1996 a separate Official Word List (OWL)--without definitions--would be made available to tournament players through the NSA, while a sanitized OSPD would be sold to the general public. OSPD would contain no offensive words and a not-too-prominent disclaimer that it was only 'official' for school and recreational play. Since offensiveness is highly subjective, determining the words that were eventually expunged from OSPD was itself controversial. Brace yourself: Among the 303 'naughty' words you'll no longer see in OSPD are FATSO, LIBBERS, REDSKIN, GRINGO, BAZOOMS, COMSYMP, POONTANG, WETBACK, PAPIST, BADASS, REDNECK, BULLDYKE and STIFFIE.
Tags: Scrabble  words  censorship  political  correctness 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 3381
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ice Cutting for the Ice Man Tags: Ice  Cutting  Ice  Man  Bridgeport  Connecticut  Beardsley  Park   
Added: 30th March 2014
Views: 901
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
Bad News Bears - Sitcom Flop 1979 Successful movies don't often spawn successful TV series. Take the Bad News Bears, for instance. In the television version, Jack Warden portrayed former minor-leaguer Morris Buttermaker, the coach of the Hoover Junior High Bears, a sorry bunch of youthful misfits and bumblers. Catherine Hicks played Hoover Junior High principal Dr. Emily Rappant. Phillip Richard Allen played Roy Turner, the coach of the dreaded rival Lions. Corey Feldman, Billy Jayne (then credited as Billy Jacoby) and Meeno Peluce were cast amongst the team's players, and Tricia Cast played Amanda Wurlitzer, the Bears' star pitcher. Poor writing and subpar acting doomed this series. Three episodes into the series' second season, CBS cancelled The Bad News Bears due to low ratings. A few previously unaired episodes were shown during the summer of 1980.
Tags: sitcom  Bad  News  Bears  CBS  baseball 
Added: 23rd August 2011
Views: 1544
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Proctor and Gamble Logo Controversy Proctor & Gamble's former logo originated in 1851 as a crude cross that barge workers on the Ohio River painted on cases of P&G star candles to identify them. P&G later altered this symbol into a trademark (shown below) featuring a man in the moon overlooking 13 stars. It was said to commemorate the original 13 American colonies. Nobody seemed bothered by it for more than a century. In the mid-1980s, though, the company received unwanted media publicity when wild rumors spread that the moon-and-stars logo was a satanic symbol. The odd accusation was based on a particular passage in the Bible, specifically Revelation 12:1, which states: "And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of 12 stars." P&G's logo consisted of a man's face on the moon surrounded by 13 stars, and some claimed that the logo was a mockery of the heavenly symbol alluded to in the aforementioned verse, thus construing the logo to be satanic. Where the flowing beard meets the surrounding circle, three curls were said to be a mirror image of the number 666, or the reflected number of the beast. At the top and bottom, the hair curls in on itself, and was said to be the two horns like those of a ram that represented the false prophet. These interpretations were strongly denied by company officials, and no evidence linking P&G to the Church of Satan or any other occult organization has ever been presented. The company unsuccessfully sued Amway from 1995 to 2003 over rumors forwarded through a company voicemail system in 1995. In 2007 P&G successfully sued individual Amway distributors for reviving and propagating the false rumors. Tired of the controversy, the moon-and-stars logo was discontinued by P&G in 1985.
Tags: controversy  Proctor  and  Gamble  logo  santanism 
Added: 30th September 2011
Views: 10998
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marketing Blunder - White Coca-Cola Cans On December 1, 2011, Coca-Cola temporarily replaced its traditional red cans with a white design to draw attention to the plight of polar bears in the warming arctic. While the cause may have been good, the public's reaction to the move was overwhelmingly negative. People routinely mistook regular Coca-Cola for Diet Coke which comes in a silver can. The company received complaints from devoted fans of both Coca-Cola and Diet Coke: Diabetics and others who cannot consume sugary drinks were especially miffed when they bought the wrong product. Sales suffered as people who were looking for the traditional red cans couldn't find them. One convenience store owner in New Jersey reported that several customers tried to return opened cans when they realized they had purchased regular Coke instead of Diet Coke. On January 1, 2012, Coca-Cola ended the polar bear 'awareness program' and announced a return to the red cans of its popular 125-year-old beverage. The lesson of Coca-Cola's white can debacle? "Don't mess with the brand," said one marketing expert.
Tags: Coca-Cola  marketing  white  cans 
Added: 4th January 2012
Views: 1531
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2784
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 of 8 | Random