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Wilt Chamberlain on Whats My Line The most dominant basketball player of his era, Wilt Chamberlain, appeared as a mystery challenger on What's My Line on January 8, 1961.
Tags: Wilt  Chamberlain  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 29th January 2009
Views: 1537
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pete Maravich Dies at Age 40 The greatest college basketball player in history was Louisiana State University's Pete Maravich. He still holds the career NCAA scoring record despite playing in an era when freshmen were ineligible and there was no three-point line on the court. In a 1973 Sports Illustrated interview, Maravich championed proper diet and exercise. He said, 'I don't want to die of a heart attack when I'm 40.' On January 6, 1988 Maravich collapsed after a session of pick-up basketball in a church gymnasium. The cause of death: heart failure. He was 40 years old. Maravich's last words were, 'I feel great.'
Tags: Pete  Maravich  death  basketball 
Added: 5th April 2009
Views: 1320
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Here Comes Peter Cottontail A Story and song about...Peter Cottontail", the jazzy cartoon short about that "cool little bunny" giving baskets full of Easter joy!!!
Tags: PeterCottontail  Is  The  MAN 
Added: 8th April 2009
Views: 2824
Rating:
Posted By: mia_bambina
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3628
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
White Athlete SI Cover The December 8, 1997 issue of Sports Illustrated opened a can of worms with its cover story: What Ever Happened to the White Athlete? (The caption was strategically placed over a photo of the all-white 1956 Princeton basketball squad.) The story garnered all sorts of reactions--positive, negative, and everything in between. Among the most thought-provoking revelations in the article were those from a coach at a racially diverse high school who noted that very few white kids ever tried out for the school's basketball and football teams, but there was no shortage of whites who tried out for soccer, baseball, and volleyball.
Tags: SI  white  athletes  cover 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 1150
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Posted By: Lava1964
1962 Easter Church Etiquette For Teens From Seventeen magazine March 1962. An Easter tutorial about attending church. Just amazing. What didn't the vintage Seventeen magazine's cover? Who talks about this stuff today? It's not even politically correct to say you even GO to church today! There's some useful material here if you look past gloves and stockings being necessary. LOL My parents stopped letting me bring a friend with us to church because all we did was giggle. Kids. We'd just look at each other and start to laugh. I think it was because we knew we weren't supposed to laugh in church, but that made it harder NOT to. I like the part about preparing for the collection ahead of time. I remember all those people who held up the basket and made jingling racket while searching their pockets for coins. Another thing about being prepared, you won't accidentally give a ten dollar bill instead of the miserly one dollar you actually MEANT to give. LOL
Tags: easter  church  etiquette  teens  VintageSeventeenMagazine   
Added: 24th April 2011
Views: 3313
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Muhammad Ali - Gold Medal Replaced For years Muhammad Ali claimed he'd tossed his gold medal from the 1960 Rome Olympics into the Ohio River in a fit of anger after experiencing racial discrimination in his hometown of Louisville, KY. By the early 1990s, Ali admitted the story was a fabrication and that his gold medal had simply been misplaced. This clip is from the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. IOC head Juan Antonio Samaranch gave Ali a replacement medal in a special ceremony at halftime of the men's basketball final.
Tags: Muhammad  Ali  Olympics  gold  medal  replaced 
Added: 4th February 2013
Views: 1085
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 2025
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Posted By: Lava1964
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Tags: shoes 
Added: 29th July 2018
Views: 469
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Posted By: soldier12shoe
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Tags: shoes 
Added: 18th August 2018
Views: 545
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Posted By: kd11eybl

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