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1957 MLB All-Star Voting Scandal The 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game took place on July 9 of that year in St. Louis. Fans determined which players qualified for the game by sending in their votes to the Commissioner's office. However, a major stink arose when seven Cincinnati Reds garnered the most votes. (First baseman Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals was the only non-Red to win his position's voting in the National League.) The Reds who finished atop the polls were Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Frank Robinson, Gus Bell and Wally Post. The Reds were a good team, but they hardly deserved to dominate the NL All-Star balloting. (They would finish fourth in the eight-team NL in 1957.) An investigation showed that more than half the ballots cast came from Cincinnati. The Cincinnati Enquirer had printed up pre-marked ballots and distributed them with the Sunday newspaper to make it easy for Reds fans to vote often. There were even stories of bars in Cincinnati refusing to serve customers until they filled out ballots. Commissioner Ford Frick partially nullified the election results by appointing Willie Mays of the New York Giants and Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves in place of Gus Bell and Wally Post. In addition, Frick decided to strip the fans of their voting rights. Beginning in 1958, managers, players, and coaches picked the entire team until 1970, when the vote again returned to the fans. The American League won the 1957 MLB All-Star Game 6-5.
Tags: baseball  Cincinnati  Reds  All-Star  Game  election  scandal   
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 2987
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Importance of Correct Spelling During the 2010 Illinois gubernatorial election, Green Party candidate Rich Whitney was the unfortunate victim of a spelling error on the electronic voting machines used at the advance polls. Whitney's surname somehow was misspelled without the 'n'--thus his name appeared on the screen as 'Rich Whitey.' Moreover, of the 23 advanced polling stations, 12 were in predominantly black areas. The 55-year-old Whitney was predictably miffed by the gaffe. Election officials apologized for the spelling error--which was noticed too late to be corrected--but stressed that 90 percent of Illinois voters typically cast paper ballots on election day--where Green's name was spelled correctly. Green finished a poor fourth in the election. He garnered less than three percent of the vote.
Tags: Rich  Whitney  election  Illinois  spelling  error 
Added: 17th January 2011
Views: 914
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Posted By: Lava1964
Marisa Tomei Oscar Controversy [Note: This is a redo of an earlier post--with a photo that is undoubtedly Marisa Tomei this time!] One of the strangest Academy Awards stories ever focuses on Marisa Tomei's 1992 win for best supporting actress. She was awarded the Oscar for her portrayal of Mona Lisa Vito in the comedy My Cousin Vinny. Immediately after the ceremony, film critic Rex Reed made the stunning claim that presenter Jack Palance had read the wrong nominee's name as the winner. This was an incredible assertion considering that Price Waterhouse (the accounting firm that tabulates the voters' ballots) has two reps stationed near the stage who are empowered to interrupt the ceremony if such a mistake were to occur. (They've never yet had to intervene in the more than half a century of their presence.) Film critic Roger Ebert believes Reed owes Tomei an apology. Tomei herself says the ongoing rumor of her being the wrong winner has tarnished her lone Oscar victory.
Tags: Marisa  Tomei  Oscar  controversy 
Added: 19th August 2011
Views: 3539
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Posted By: Lava1964
Paper MLB All-Star Ballots Billed as 'the largest non-political election in the world,' from 1970 to 2014, Major League Baseball allowed fans to determine the starters for the annual All-Star Game using punch-out ballots. (The wisdom of such a system is certainly debatable.) Shown here is the 1977 All-Star ballot. During those 45 seasons paper ballots and ballot boxes were available at all MLB and minor league ballparks, at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and often at stores that carried official MLB-endorsed products. There was also a mail-in provision. In March 2015, however, MLB announced the discontinuation of paper ballots. This did not mean that fans could no longer vote; they just had to do it online. In 2015 MLB cited stats that showed far more fans were voting online than by paper ballot since the internet option became available.
Tags: MLB  All-Star  ballot  paper 
Added: 23rd June 2015
Views: 423
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Posted By: Lava1964

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