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Roll Out - 1973 Sitcom Flop In an attempt to duplicate the magic of MASH, CBS introduced another military-themed sitcom in October 1973: Roll Out! Set in the Second World War, Roll Out! depicted army life among the predominantly black 5050th Supply Outfit stationed in liberated France. The show was designed to examine race relations against the background of a military setting. The public was utterly uninterested. Slotted against The Odd Couple on Friday nights, Roll Out! failed badly in the ratings. Only 12 half-hour episodes were created before the show was yanked off the air early in January 1974. Here's the opening sequence.
Tags: Roll  Out  CBS  sitcom  military  black 
Added: 1st February 2014
Views: 911
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Posted By: Lava1964
          Theres No One Like Our  Clint Remember those Clint Eastwood spaghetti westerns of the 60's? No matter how bad Clint was, we always loved him!
Tags: clint  eastwood  eli  wallach  lee  van  cleef  the  good  the  bad  and  the  ugly  for  a  few  dollars  more   
Added: 21st October 2007
Views: 1885
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Posted By: Guido
COME MONDAY   in Sunny Key West There's been so much said about Jimmy Buffet, both good and bad, but you can't deny the boy's got talent..
Tags: come  monday  jimmy  buffet  70s  music 
Added: 14th November 2007
Views: 1540
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Posted By: Babs64
Top 50 Sports Bloopers and u thought YOU had a bad day!
Tags: bloopers  sports 
Added: 14th November 2007
Views: 1705
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Posted By: Teresa
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2036
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Posted By: Lava1964
First Bad Family Feud Player This clip is from early in the first season of Family Feud, so this poor schmuck might be the first in a long line of players to give truly rotten answers during the Fast Money round. (You've got to love how Richard Dawson's shirt matches his tie. Whatever happened to that style?)
Tags: Family  Feud 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 1626
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Posted By: Lava1964
Awake . . .not to this extent (at all), but i did have this happen . . i told the surgeon about it AFTER i was in recovery . . i really was not able to speak at the time, and it was only (i say ONLY a lumpectomy, so it didn't hurt THAT BAD)
Tags: film  Awake  Hayden  Christensen  Jessica  Alba 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 1052
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Posted By: Teresa
The Cat Did It Yeah Thats It Buster wants High Speed broadband internet badly for Christmas, but his owners are not sure. This commercial was used to sell Adelphia Power Link and cable services bundled.
Tags: adelphia  power  link  buster  computer  ad 
Added: 3rd December 2007
Views: 1762
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Posted By: Naomi
Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1418
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Posted By: Lava1964
I Would Do Anything For Love but i won't do that . . and here's some Meat Loaf TRIVIA: This was Meat Loaf's comeback song. In 1977, his album BAT OUT OF HELL, produced the hits "TWO OUT OF THREE AIN'T BAD," "PARADISE BY THE DASHBOARD LIGHT," and "YOU TOOK THE WORDS RIGHT OUTTA MY MOUTH," all written by piano player Jim Steinman. After a falling out with Steinman and difficulty in his personal life, Meat Loaf released several unsuccessful albums before reuniting with Steinman for Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell, which was considered a sequel to the 1977 album. This has a very similar sound to Meat Loaf's previous hits, and the bombastic, piano-driven style went over well with his old fans as well as a new generation of listeners, helping make this a massive hit...
Tags: Meat  Loaf        Bat  Out  Of  Hell        I  Would  Do  ANYTHING    For  Love  But  I  Won 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1254
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Posted By: Teresa

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