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1973 Buick Ad  Can You Believe Under Thirty-seven hundred Dollars Tags: Buick  automobiles  new  cars 
Added: 3rd August 2007
Views: 1586
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
        Speaking of  Cars Wow, this will take some of us back.....includes some pretty decent music too.
Tags: automobiles  antique  cars  classics 
Added: 24th September 2007
Views: 2864
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Man Catches Bullet Between His Teeth This clip is an excerpt from an old 50's TV program called 'You Asked For It', a popular human-interest show that originally aired on TV between 1950-59. On the show, viewers were asked to send in postcards describing something that they wanted to see on television, such as the reenactment of William Tell shooting an apple off his son's head. (1950 US National Archery Champion Stan Overby performed the feat, shooting an apple off his assistant's head.) Short film clips were also presented, with the selections based upon viewer requests. As a consequence, many of the clips were presented multiple times. Some of the more popular clips included a tour of the bizarre Winchester Mystery House and the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. The program was named 'The Art Baker Show', after the series creator and host. In April 1951, the show's title was changed to 'You Asked For It'. Originally airing on the cash-strapped DuMont Network from December 1950 to December 1951, it moved to ABC, where it remained until the end of its original run in September 1959. The show was sponsored by Skippy peanut butter and Studebaker Automobiles. I remember watching this series as a kid, but if I'd seen this show it would have definitely stood out in my memory! No way did this man perform this 'feat', but it sure must have left kids wondering back then..he probably had the bullet already in his mouth and the officer was shooting blanks...duh..I mean..shooting a real bullet almost point blank into a man's face on live tv is going to be messy, to say the least..
Tags: you  asked  for  it  art  baker  dumont  network  abc 
Added: 5th January 2008
Views: 4173
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
The Bantam 60 That's right..60 MPG!!! The Bantam was the successor to the American Austin, built at Butler from 1930 to 1934. Both cars were small, fuel-efficient and attractive in design. Bantam branded its cars with names like 'Riviera' and 'Hollywood' in direct contradiction to its shoestring budget. Perhaps Bantam's most enduring achievement was the production of the first successful 'Jeep' for the U.S. Army in 1940. The huge military contract, however, went to Ford and Willys. Bantam ended car production in 1941.
Tags: bantam  60  automobiles  antique  cars  jeeps  butler 
Added: 24th January 2008
Views: 6109
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Chevy Bonanza Sale This 1967 ad featured the cast of Bonanza to promote Chevrolet autos. Hmm, I don't remember too many automobiles on the Ponderosa.
Tags: Chevy  Bonanza 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1087
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jack Dempsey Promotes DeSotos Former heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey promotes the snazzy new line of 1938 DeSoto automobiles in this period magazine ad. (As a big fan of Dempsey's, I must say that's not a very good likeness of him.)
Tags: Jack  Dempsey  boxing  DeSoto  ad 
Added: 4th December 2011
Views: 880
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
George Davis - Vanishing Baseball Superstar George Stacey Davis was one of the finest shortstops in Major League Baseball history. He enjoyed a 20-year MLB career from 1890 through 1909. Blessed with a strong arm and an excellent batting eye, Davis was a perennial star for the New York Giants during the late 19th and early 20th century. A switch-hitter, Davis compiled 2,688 career hits and 615 stolen bases. He still holds the Giants' club record for the longest hitting streak (36 games). So valuable was Davis to the Giants that he became one of the controversial figures in the war between the National and American Leagues when he jumped to the Chicago White Stockings of the AL in 1902. Once Davis' playing career ended, he coached Amherst College's baseball team, managed a bowling alley, and sold automobiles for a time. Then he vanished. For decades many noteworthy baseball historians rated Davis as the best player not in the Hall of Fame--and no one seemed to know what had happened to him. In 1968, Lee Allen, the historian at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, wrote an article for The Sporting News in which he asked for any information about Davis' later years and death. A woman claiming to be Davis' niece replied. She put Allen in touch with Davis' estranged sister who suggested Allen should check the records of state hospitals in Pennsylvania. Allen eventually found Davis' death certificate. He had died in a Philadelphia mental institution in 1940 at the age of 70. He had lived there for six years, suffering from the effects of syphilis. Records showed his wife paid $41 to have him quickly interred in a pauper's grave. In 1998 Davis was posthumously inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans' Committee. For the only time in the Hall of Fame's history, no living relative could be found to accept a deceased inductee's plaque at the induction ceremony, although 50 fans from Davis' hometown of Cohoes, NY were present. The purchase of a handsome headstone for Davis' previously unmarked grave was financed by the Society for American Baseball Research shortly after Davis was enshrined in Cooperstown.
Tags: baseball  George  Davis  vanished  syphilis  Hall  of  Fame 
Added: 31st December 2015
Views: 310
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Citroen Ad on Eiffel Tower One of the great architectural marvels ever created was the Eiffel Tower, named for its engineer Gustave Eiffel whose company built it. It was originally supposed to be a temporary structure erected to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the French Republic for the 1889 World's Fair in Paris. Not everyone in 1889 was enamored by it. One French newspaper referred to it as "Mr. Eiffel's monstrosity." When it was completed in 1889 it stood 1,046 feet tall and was the tallest man-made structure in the word--a distinction it held for 40 years when it was eclipsed slightly by the Chrysler Building in New York City. (In 1957 a 17-foot antenna was added to the top of the Tower, making it slightly taller than the Chrysler Building.) For about nine years, from 1925 through 1934, the tower that dominated the Parisian skyline featured tacky advertising for Citroen automobiles. Thankfully it hasn't been marred by such commercialism in more than 80 years.
Tags: Eiffel  Tower  Citroen  advertising 
Added: 14th July 2015
Views: 358
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Henry Ford Invents Charcoal Most people realize that Henry Ford was responsible for the assembly line--a groundbreaking factory innovation that made the manufacturing of automobiles (and everything else) go much faster. Few people, however, know that Ford also invented modern charcoal briquets! Amazingly, Ford's auto assembly line led to the development of the blackened fuel chunks. Here's what happened: One day in the 1920s Ford visited his Dearborn automobile plant and was aghast at the amount of wood that was wasted in the manufacture of his Model T cars. Ford found all types of waste to be unacceptable, so he wanted the wood bits left over from his cars' wheels and interiors to be put to a good and profitable use. He figured that since wood chips were highly flammable, they could be used as a handy portable fuel source. He consulted with some chemists and came up with the idea of charcoal pieces suitable for barbecues. Furthermore, they fit in nicely with promotional literature of the era that encouraged American consumers to buy Ford automobiles for peaceful, long drives in the country. What better way to cap off a serene weekend drive than to have a cookout using Ford's charcoal? This photo shows a package of 1920s briquets bearing the familiar Ford logo.
Tags: Henry  Ford  charcoal  inventor 
Added: 11th February 2016
Views: 464
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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