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A passage ..... "...From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remember'd; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England now a-bed Shall think themselves accursed they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day" Name the play. Name the author. Name the battle. Give the date of the battle Name the theater that it was reputedly performed in.
Tags: Answer  the  attached  questions. 
Added: 28th August 2008
Views: 1044
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Posted By: jedwgrn
FDR Memorial Controversy 1996 In 1996, when plans were announced to erect a memorial to the late Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Washington, D.C., an emotionally charged controversy erupted: Should America's only four-term president be shown in a wheelchair? FDR had been crippled by polio as a 39-year-old in 1921--and he went to great lengths to conceal his condition for the rest of his life. Because of the stigma attached to disabilities at the time, the accommodating media of the day kept FDR's secret from the public. Most photos and newsreels of FDR show him seated behind a desk or in an automobile; FDR was seldom photgraphed in a wheelchair or standing with the help of leg braces. Thus, a passionate dispute arose about how to memorialize FDR. Should he be shown as he truly was or as the public remembered him? This photograph shows the result: In his statue, FDR is draped in a cloak, which presumably hides the wheelchair. This compromise did not suit many advocates for the disabled. A smaller statue of FDR, clearly in a wheelchair, was erected near the main memorial in 2001.
Tags: FDR  memorial  controversy  wheelchair 
Added: 11th October 2009
Views: 7240
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dance Cards Here was a quaint custom that has sadly disappeared: Dance cards. A dance card was commonly used by a young woman to record the names of the gentlemen with whom she intended to dance each successive dance at a formal ball. They appear to have originated in 18th century, but their use first became widespread in 19th century Vienna. Typically a card would list of all the dances for the evening and their style: for example, waltz, polka, or quadrille. Opposite each dance was a space to record the name of the scheduled partner for that dance. After the event ended, the card was frequently kept by the young lady as a souvenir of the evening. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the date and sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady's wrist or ball gown. From the 19th century until the First World War, dance cards for the elite of Austria-Hungary were often very elaborate, with some even incorporating precious metals and jewels. In modern times the expression "dance card" is often used metaphorically, as when someone says "pencil me into your dance card," meaning "find some time to spend with me". Conversely, someone's "dance card is full" implies that even though they may be interested, they have no time for another person.
Tags: dance  cards 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 2892
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Wallace Whats My Line Controversy - 1957 On the May 26, 1957 episode of the popular panel show What's My Line?, Sammy Davis, Jr. was a last-minute mystery guest substitution for Mike Wallace. More than 20 years later, in his 1978 book about WML, executive producer Gil Fates explained what happened that night: WML panel moderator John Daly and Mike Wallace had professional differences that stemmed from the fact that they were both newsmen for ABC. Daly was ABC's newscaster while Wallace had recently been hired to do The Mike Wallace Interview program. Wallace had vaulted to fame with a series of sensationalistic and sleazy interviews on local TV in New York City--and Daly wanted nothing to do with him. Through a leak at ABC, Daly found out five hours before WML's live broadcast that Wallace was scheduled to be that night's mystery guest. He called Fates and told him he refused to do a show with Wallace. Daly was so popular and integral to WML that Fates had to find a replacement mystery guest. He quickly booked Sammy Davis, Jr., who was appearing at the Latin Quarter two blocks away from the WML studio. Everything seemingly went smoothly that night and a crisis had been averted. However, the next morning, the front page of the New York Journal-American carried this headline: "DALY BARS WALLACE: SWITCH IN GUESTS AVERTS HASSLE ON WHAT'S MY LINE?" Fates stated that there was no byline attached to the article, but its style was unmistakably that of WML panelist and gossip columnist Dorothy Kilgallen. The article ended by saying, "TV insiders claim that Daly was violently opposed to ABC's hiring of Wallace in the first place." Fates found out afterward that Dorothy had sensed something was amiss and she had "pried the details out of [WML staffer] Bob Bach." Fates went on to say, "Aside from the mechanics needed to operate the program, Daly didn't speak to Kilgallen for almost six months."
Tags: TV  Whats  My  Line  Mike  Wallace  John  Daly 
Added: 5th June 2012
Views: 8594
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Posted By: Lava1964
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 1595
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Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Johnsons Restaurants Another iconic American business has ended. The last remaining Howard Johnson's restaurant--located in Lake George, NY--shut its doors in 2017. First established in 1954, at one time HoJo's numbered more than 600 restaurants. They were common sights along America's highways, often attached to motor inns. The chain is fondly remembered for its large portions of quality food and its wide variety of ice cream selections. However, competition from fast food restaurants took its toll. By 2009 only three Howard Johnson's restaurants remained. Here's a photo montage from the Lake Placid HoJo's.
Tags: restaurant  Howard  Johnson 
Added: 19th August 2017
Views: 1195
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Posted By: Lava1964

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