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1935 Chinese Bayer Aspirin Ad that aspirin looks enormous!
Tags: ad  chinese  bayer  aspirin 
Added: 12th July 2007
Views: 2831
Rating:
Posted By: sneakysnake
Irene Cara on Ted Macks Original Amateur Hour Television shows like American Idol are hardly new. From 1947 thorugh 1970, Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour gave aspiring performers a chance to display their talents in front of a television audience. (Viewers were encouraged to vote for their favorite acts--by postcard!) This is a 1967 Ted Mack clip of eight-year-old Irene Cara singing.
Tags: Ted  Mack  Irene  Cara  Amateur  Hour 
Added: 25th February 2008
Views: 2368
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Posted By: Lava1964
Adolf Hitler Painting 1913 Before the First World War, Adolf Hitler was an aspiring artist in Austria. Here's a sample of his painting from 1913.
Tags: art  Adolf  Hitler 
Added: 13th August 2009
Views: 1443
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Posted By: Lava1964
Then and Now- Brigitte Bardot In her early life Bardot was an aspiring ballet dancer. She started her acting career in 1952 and after appearing in 16 films became world-famous due to her role in the controversial film And God Created Woman. During her career in show business Bardot starred in 48 films, performed in numerous musical shows, and recorded 80 songs. She celebrated her in 75th birthday September 28.
Tags: Then  and  Now-  Brigitte  Bardot  Yikes!   
Added: 2nd January 2010
Views: 6028
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Posted By: Cliffy
Vanishing TV Character - John Burns of Taxi First airing in 1978, the ABC sitcom Taxi was an instant hit because of its clever writing and superb cast. In the pilot episode, a naive and somewhat dopey student named John Burns arrives in New York City and ends up in the Sunshine Cab building because he doesn't have a small bill to pay for his fare and main character Alex Reiger can't make change for a $50 note. By the end of that first episode, Burns has joined the rest of the gang as a cab driver. Randall Carver played Burns. Burns was by far the weakest character in the show's regular cast. Naivete was the key personality trait of Burns, but it was also the hallmark of Tony Banta (played by Tony Danza), an aspiring but largely unsuccessful pro boxer who made his living as a cabbie. Banta's and Burns' lines were so similar that they became almost interchangeable. A mid-season plot development in which Burns marries a girl after just one date failed to make his character stand out. At the end of the first season, John Burns just disappeared from the cast. What happened to him? Who knows? Not only was Burns' absence never explained, he was never mentioned again during the remainder of the series' successful run. Carver himself only had a handful of TV gigs in his post-Taxi acting career. Carver was essentially replaced in the Taxi cast by Christopher Lloyd whose burnt-out hippie character Reverend Jim Ignatowski was immensely popular. Lloyd won two Emmys for best supporting actor in a comedy series.
Tags: Taxi  John  Burns  Randall  Carver  sitcom   
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 3500
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1903
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oregon Poisoned Eggs Accident - 1942 On Wednesday, November 18, 1942 a horrible mistake killed 47 patients at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem--a facility housing those afflicted with mental illnesses. An evening meal of scrambled eggs was being prepared by the two-person kitchen crew. The cooking staff had been much larger, but the manpower demands of the Second World War had reduced it to just head cook Mary O'Hare and her male assistant A.B. McKillop. Against hospital policy, McKillop designated a trusted patient, 27-year-old George A. Nosen, to go to a downstairs storage room to get a scoopful of powdered milk to add to the frozen egg yolks. Nosen entered the wrong room and brought back a six-pound scoop of roach poison from an unmarked bin. The roach poison contained huge amounts of sodium fluoride. In very tiny amounts, sodium fluoride is harmless. It is found in most toothpastes in minuscule amounts to strengthen teeth. However, even an amount as small as an aspirin can be deadly to a human. Within a short time of the eggs being served, patients became violently ill, some vomiting blood. By midnight 30 patients had died. The death toll eventually rose to 47. About 460 patients in total suffered some ill effects. McKillop quickly suspected something had gone terribly amiss because of the powdered milk. This was confirmed when Nosen showed him the bin where it had come from. Investigators were perplexed as the kitchen staff initially reported that nothing outside the norm had happened in preparing the meal. Beyond the hospital theories abounded about what may have caused the deaths. Some people blamed them on a deliberate act of malice by a homicidal patient. Others thought it was an extreme case of salmonella due to improper food storage. Still others thought it might be war-related sabotage as the frozen egg yolks were the same type that were being sent overseas to feed American troops. Eventually McKillop's conscience bothered him and he told the truth about Nosen mistaking the roach poison for powdered milk. McKillop wanted to be held solely responsible for the mishap, but he, O'Hare and Nosen were all arrested. They were never charged as a Grand Jury ruled the incident to have been merely a tragic accident--one that killed nearly four dozen innocent patients. Nosen remained an inmate at the hospital--where he was looked upon as a pariah--until his death in 1983 at age 68. He suffered a fatal heart attack while scuffling with a 75-year-old patient.
Tags: poisoned  eggs  Oregon  1942 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 1527
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Posted By: Lava1964

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