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Redford Theater 80 years old last month. Still has original pipe organ. One of only two left in Detroit, the other at the restored Fox Theater 4$ a show With pipe organ at the beginning and Intermission. When was the last time you went to a movie with an Intermission. There currently restoring the japanese artwork inside that was covered up during World War II. In a bad part of town but still packs em in. Real butter on the popcorn too! Lol
Tags: 1928-2008 
Added: 5th March 2008
Views: 1250
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Willie Pep You've got to love the artwork on these classic magazine covers! The July 1949 issue of The Ring magazine featured the greatest featherweight of them all--Willie Pep.
Tags: Ring  magazine  Willie  Pep 
Added: 5th November 2008
Views: 1059
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1822
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Civil War News Trading Cards Civil War News was a set of 88 collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists. The card set was characterized by vivid colors, graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (card #21 'Painful Death' being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person. The information was presented in newspaper-article fashion complete with a headline. The complete set of cards, including a checklist, was first printed for the American market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada. A&BC produced the sets in England. The cards came five to a wax pack with a stick of bubble gum. Also included in each package was a facsimile of Confederate paper currency. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips.
Tags: trading  cards  Civil  War  News 
Added: 9th February 2011
Views: 5646
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1948 Easter Brunch From the pages of Seventeen magazine March 1948. An Easter brunch layout. Artwork by Valz. This is a very humble brunch by today's standards. Even for teens to give.I like the colored Easter eggs used for decoration. Better not touch those, I guess. LOL
Tags: Easter  1948  brunch  teens  VintageSeventeenMagazine   
Added: 24th April 2011
Views: 1677
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 6959
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Miller Band Belt Buckle The artwork even became fashion wear!
Tags: Steve  Miller  Band  Belt  Buckle  1977  artwork  pegusus  fashion 
Added: 25th September 2012
Views: 2262
Rating:
Posted By: Steve

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