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Think I Will Go For A Dip Remember when this came out. . did u think twice about going into the ocean?
Tags: movie  peter  benchley  steven  spielberg  shark  amity  roy  scheider  robert    shaw  martin  brody 
Added: 3rd July 2007
Views: 2528
Rating:
Posted By: sneakysnake
Movie Legends Jane Russell Jane Russell was born Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell in Minn on June 21, 1921. She first became interested in drama in high school, and in 1940, was signed to a seven year contract by millionaire Howard Hughes, who arranged for her motion picture debut in The Outlaw (1943), a story about Billy the Kid that went to great lengths to showcase her voluptuous figure. Although the movie was completed in 1941, it was released for a limited showing two years later. There were problems with the censorship of the production code over the way her ample cleavage was displayed. When the movie was finally passed, it had a general release in 1946. Together with Lana Turner and Rita Hayworth, Russell personified the sensuously contoured sweater girl look and became a popular pin-up with Service men during World War II. She went on to perform in an assortment of roles, which included playing Calamity Jane in The Paleface (1948); Mike Delroy in Son of Paleface (1952), Gentlemen Marry Blondes,The Revolt of Mamie Stover, Fate is the Hunter and many more. Though her screen image was that of a sex goddess, her private life lacked the sensation and scandal that followed other actresses of the time, such as Lana Turner. Although in her autobiography, Jane admitted that she had survived two attempted rapes un-harmed, that her first marriage had been speckled with adultery and violence, and that she had been an alcoholic since she was a teenager. She also revealed that in addition to this, however, she was also a born-again Christian, which was one of the things that had helped her cope. Jane Russell currently lives on the Central Coast of California.
Tags: jane  russell  movie  legends  sex  symbols 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 3257
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Posted By: Naomi
Doris Day sings Secret Love The wonderful Doris Day sings Secret Love from the film Calamity Jane.
Tags: Doris  Day  Secret  Love 
Added: 18th November 2007
Views: 1758
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Deadwood Stage Doris Day at her best in one of the best musicals ever!
Tags: Doris  Day  Musical  Calamity  Jane 
Added: 3rd February 2008
Views: 1425
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
The Windy City Calamity Jane, yer darn tooten.
Tags: Doris  Day  Calamity  Jane 
Added: 4th February 2008
Views: 1396
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
Bradford City Grandstand Fire - 1985 Here is video of a terrible sports calamity: On May 11, 1985, English soccer club Bradford City were celebrating their promotion from the third division to the second division, having mathematically clinched the championship with a week to spare. The final game of the 1984-85 season at Valley Parade Stadium was against Lincoln City. More than 11,000 spectators were on hand--about twice the home average that season--to witness the festive pregame ceremonies featuring the championship trophy presentation. Yorkshire Television, with John Helm providing the commentary, was present to record the match for a tape-delayed broadcast the following day. Everyone was in a jovial mood until about 40 minutes after the match began. A fire broke out underneath Section G of the wooden grandstand--an antiquated structure that had not been modified since 1911 and was slated for demolition at the end of the season. The blaze likely started from a discarded match or cigarette that fell through the grandstand's floor boards. Beneath the grandstand was an enormous amount of flammable material; the team used the area for storage of old programs, among other things. Because of windy conditions, within four minutes a huge fire had engulfed the grandstand. There were no extinguishers nearby and no easy way to exit the grandstand in the event of an emergency. Initially it appeared that everyone was able to escape the danger by jumping onto the pitch, but 56 people died and 265 others were injured. Most of the fatalities were fans under 20 years old or over 70. One victim was Sam Firth, the club's 86-year-old former chairman. Many fans perished near locked gates or in the washrooms under the stands. Wooden grandstands were outlawed at stadiums in the UK following the tragedy. There were many heroic actions during the fire. Some 50 fans later received commendations for their rescue efforts.
Tags: soccer  Bradford  City  Fire 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1626
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Posted By: Lava1964
WWII Hawaii Overprint Money After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was a legitimate fear that the Japanese would next launch a full-scale invasion of the Hawaiian Islands and occupy them. Among the consequences if that nightmare scenario actually unfolded was that all the US paper money in Hawaii would be seized from banks, businesses and private citizens and be used to finance Imperial Japan's war machine. Accordingly, a remarkable decision was made: During the first half of 1942, Hawaii's residents were ordered take their paper money to special collection areas and exchange it for new bills. Each bill had a special overprint of the word HAWAII on its reverse side. If Hawaii ever did fall to the Japanese, the US government would immediately declare the Hawaii overprint bills to be worthless. The old bills that were exchanged--about $200 million of them--were burned under the supervision of the American military. Such a calamity never occurred, of course. The overprint notes are still acceptable as legitimate US money today, although they rarely are found in general circulation.
Tags: Hawaii  WWII  money  overprint  bills 
Added: 22nd May 2017
Views: 877
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 821
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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