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Cafe Americain - Sitcom Flop 1993 A ratings disappointment for NBC in the 1993-94 TV season was Café Americain, a sitcom starring Valerie Bertinelli. Bertinelli played a young American woman, Holly Aldrige, who finds a job working as a waitress in a small café in France even though she speaks no French. The cast consisted of an assortment of eccentric characters from around the world who regularly visited the café, generating comedic circumstances. One, Madame Ybarra, a former dictator's wife, was a thinly veiled spoof of Imelda Marcos. Another was Fabiana Borelli, a tempestuous Italian model, and her perpetually jealous Italian lover Carlo. They regularly sparred and reconciled. The show never garnered a following, even with a favorable timeslot change. It was yanked from NBC's regular schedule in February 1994 after just 16 episodes. In May two previously unaired episodes were shown on one night.
Tags: Valerie  Bertinelli  Cafe  Americain 
Added: 8th September 2011
Views: 1601
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Posted By: Lava1964
Little League WS Bans Foreign Teams - 1975 If you can't beat 'em--ban 'em! The Little League World Series became a truly international event in the mid-1960s. Teams from Asia and Central America began travelling to South Wiliamsport, PA to compete against the best American teams. Embarrassingly for the Americans, the foreigners began to win regularly. So, of course, the only logical thing to do was to ban the foreigners! At the 1975 LLWS, only four teams competed--all regional champions from the U.S. Lakewood, New Jersey defeated the Belmont Heights Little League of Tampa, Florida in the championship game on August 23. This was the only LLWS in which Little League banned all non-US clubs from the tournament. After a justifiable uproar of criticism, the ban on foreign teams was rescinded the following year. An American team did not win the LLWS again until 1982. Below is a photo from the 1975 tourney, showing Wilbert Davis of Tampa scoring a run. Davis was killed in action in Iraq in 2003.
Tags: Little  League  baseball  xenophobia 
Added: 10th September 2011
Views: 4198
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Posted By: Lava1964
Make a Wish- Opening and Closing As previously reported by Lava Make A Wish was an American television series which ran on ABC from 1971 to 1976. Produced by ABC News, it was hosted by musician Tom Chapin and created and produced by Lester Cooper. Also, Tom Chapin is Harry Chapin's brother who was famous for the song Taxi and other folklore type music.
Tags: Make  a  Wish-  Opening  and  Closing,  1971,  1976,  1970s  70s,  ABC  News,  Tom  Chapmin,  Lester  Cooper 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 1290
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
These Are The Days - Cartoon Series Here's A Saturday morning cartoon show that almost no one remembers: These Are The Days. It ran on ABC from September 7, 1974 to September 5, 1976. These Are the Days was an animated television series from Hanna-Barbera. The series, although critically acclaimed, only lasted 16 total episodes. The show originally aired on Saturday mornings but was switched to Sundays midway through 1975. The second season was almost entirely comprised of reruns. The show was set at the turn of the 20th century in an American town called Elmsville. It portrayed the everyday lives of the Day family--which consisted of a widow and her three children, along with her father (the kids' grandpa) who was a skilled inventor. Each episode featured the various family members and their interactions with friends and neighbors, usually ending with a lesson learned. It was designed to capitalize on the popularity of the nostalgia and rustic family lifestyle of The Waltons, but it failed to catch on with most youngsters. Frank Cady (Sam Drucker from Green Acres and Petticoat Junction) provided grandfather Homer Day's voice. June Lockhart was the voice of Martha Day, the mother.
Tags: These  Are  The  Days  cartoon  nostalgia 
Added: 14th September 2011
Views: 3555
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Posted By: Lava1964
USS Maine Baseball Team The American battleship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898. About three-quarters of the ship's crew perished. Only 16 sailors onboard were completely uninjured. Accusations of sabotage led to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. (Evidence from modern investigations of the wreck suggests that a spontaneous internal explosion of coal near the ship's magazine likely caused the explosion--not sabotage.) Be that as it may, here is a photo of the USS Maine's baseball team. The man standing at the top left, J.H. Bloomer, was the only team member to survive the explosion.
Tags: USS  Maine  baseball  team 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 2040
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Posted By: Lava1964
Proctor and Gamble Logo Controversy Proctor & Gamble's former logo originated in 1851 as a crude cross that barge workers on the Ohio River painted on cases of P&G star candles to identify them. P&G later altered this symbol into a trademark (shown below) featuring a man in the moon overlooking 13 stars. It was said to commemorate the original 13 American colonies. Nobody seemed bothered by it for more than a century. In the mid-1980s, though, the company received unwanted media publicity when wild rumors spread that the moon-and-stars logo was a satanic symbol. The odd accusation was based on a particular passage in the Bible, specifically Revelation 12:1, which states: "And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of 12 stars." P&G's logo consisted of a man's face on the moon surrounded by 13 stars, and some claimed that the logo was a mockery of the heavenly symbol alluded to in the aforementioned verse, thus construing the logo to be satanic. Where the flowing beard meets the surrounding circle, three curls were said to be a mirror image of the number 666, or the reflected number of the beast. At the top and bottom, the hair curls in on itself, and was said to be the two horns like those of a ram that represented the false prophet. These interpretations were strongly denied by company officials, and no evidence linking P&G to the Church of Satan or any other occult organization has ever been presented. The company unsuccessfully sued Amway from 1995 to 2003 over rumors forwarded through a company voicemail system in 1995. In 2007 P&G successfully sued individual Amway distributors for reviving and propagating the false rumors. Tired of the controversy, the moon-and-stars logo was discontinued by P&G in 1985.
Tags: controversy  Proctor  and  Gamble  logo  santanism 
Added: 30th September 2011
Views: 11056
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Posted By: Lava1964
1962 Mail Order Monkey It's hard to believe that this is real. And to think it was an advertisement found in a young girls magazine. American Girl magazine December 1962.
Tags: 1962  mail  order  monkey   
Added: 8th October 2011
Views: 2618
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Posted By: AngoraSox
The Great Ballantine Carl Ballantine (born Meyer Kessler; September 27, 1917 - November 3, 2009) was an American magician, comedian and actor
Tags: Carl  Ballantine,  The  Great  Ballantine,  Meyer  Kesslermagician,  comedian,  actor 
Added: 25th October 2011
Views: 1819
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Posted By: pfc
Olympian Anthony Hembrick Misses Bus During the mid-1980s, Detroit's Anthony Hembrick, a member of the U.S. Army, was a three-time American amateur middleweight boxing champion. He was perceived to be a medal hopeful when he arrived at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. However, Hembrick never got the chance to show his stuff because he never got the opportunity to fight there. Hembrick and his coach, Ken Adams, were misinformed about the time of Hembrick's first-round match and missed catching a bus from the Olympic Village that would have gotten him to the boxing venue in ample time. By the time Hembrick and Adams arrived at Chamshil Students' Gymnasium, Hembrick had been disqualified and the match was awarded to South Korean Ha Jong-Ho. The 1988 Olympic boxing tournament was replete with odd incidents and controversies. Anti-American sentiment among the host South Koreans was widespread. Some conspiracy-minded people believe Hembrick was deliberately misled about the time of his match so the South Korean boxer would win by walkover. Hembrick later embarked on a pro boxing career, usually at light heavyweight, that was largely disappointing. He was often introduced before his bouts as "the man who missed the bus."
Tags: Anthony  Hembrick  Olympic  boxing  disqualified 
Added: 2nd November 2011
Views: 1914
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Posted By: Lava1964
Frank Buckles - The Last Doughboy Frank Buckles was the last surviving American verteran of the First World War. This photo show him with President George W. Bush in 2007. He had volunteered at age 16 and drove ambulances and motorcycles in France. He died just after his 110th birthday in 2011. Because Buckles was not a combat soldier, he did not qualify for burial at Arlington National Cemetery. It took a special act of Congress for Buckles to be interred there. Buckles died a few months before Claude Choules, a British sailor living in Australia. Choules was the last accepted WWI combatant from any country.
Tags: Frank  Buckles  First  World  War  doughboy 
Added: 22nd November 2011
Views: 984
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Posted By: Lava1964

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