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It is nice to re-visit these days You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time? And you didn't pay for air? And, you got trading stamps to boot?
Tags: oil  checked,  gas,  trading  stamps,  Nostalgia 
Added: 22nd October 2011
Views: 3554
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Posted By: mia_bambina
Gomer gets a Marine Haircut Tags: Gomer  gets  a  Marine  Haircut,  crew  cut,  USMC,  Gomer  Pyle  USMC,  Gomer  Pyle,  haircut,  Floyd  the  Barber,  Marine,  Marine  Haircut 
Added: 4th November 2011
Views: 2017
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Posted By: pfc
Mr Rogers Neighborhood- First episode Opening Air date: 2-19-1968 I don't think the opening ever changed.
Tags: Mr.  Rodgers,  Fred  Rodgers,  Mr  Rogers  Neighborhood,  CPTV  childrens  TV  children 
Added: 30th December 2011
Views: 4552
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Posted By: pfc
Misfits of Science Misfits of Science was a short-lived NBC science fiction program. Only 15 episodes were made for the 1985-86 season--and just 14 aired--before it was cancelled due to low ratings. Misfits of Science featured young adults with unusual powers who were melded into a crime fighting unit. Among them was Dean Paul Martin (Dean Martin's son). He played Dr. Billy Hayes who organized the unit. Kevin Peter Hall, who was anywhere from 7'2" to 7'4" tall, played Dr. Elvin Lincoln who had the ability to shrink himself to a height of just six inches. A young Courteney Cox played juvenile delinquent Gloria Dinallo who possessed telekinetic powers. Here is the show's very strange opening montage.
Tags: Misfits  of  Science  NBC   
Added: 17th January 2014
Views: 1116
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnnie Ray 1927-1990 Johnnie Ray is almost forgotten today, but he was a huge singing star in the early 1950s. At the peak of his career, Ray's income was $35,000 a week. Born in Oregon in 1927, Ray had top 40 hits until 1957. Despite being skinny, pigeon-toed, half-deaf and effeminate, this highly emotional performer was the most popular male singer of the pre-Elvis Presely era. Indeed, when Elvis first started out, he was often introduced on stage as "the new Johnnie Ray". Known as "the Prince of Wails" for his distinctive singing style, Ray is mostly remembered for his lip-quivering early 1950s hits such as Cry; Please, Mr Sun; and The Little White Cloud That Cried. His live performances, in which he sometimes played the piano, were wildly unpredictable. It was not uncommon for Ray to break into tears or flop to the stage floor while belting out a tune. His 1954 recording of Such A Night was the first chart hit to be banned by the BBC for its "suggestive" lyrics. Several American radio stations followed suit. Nevertheless, it still ended up topping the British charts. Ray had an interesting personal life: He became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident at a Boy Scout camp and prominently wore a large hearing aid for the rest of his life. He was twice arrested in Detroit for soliciting sex from men. The first arrest was in 1951 just before he became famous. (He quietly pled guilty and paid a fine.) The second arrest was in 1959, but he was acquitted by an all-female jury. He is rumored to have had a long affair with newspaper writer Dorothy Kilgallen (of What's My Line? fame) that began after his first of two mystery guest appearances on the show. Ray was a heavy drinker who was hospitalized for alcoholism in 1960. He died in 1990, at age 63, from liver disease.
Tags: Johnnie  Ray  singer 
Added: 17th January 2012
Views: 4431
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Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5214
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Posted By: Lava1964
Last Female WWI veteran dies Florence Patterson Green never saw the front line. Her war was spent serving food, not dodging bullets. But Green, who died on February 4, 2012, aged 110, was the last known surviving veteran of World War I. She was serving with the Women's Royal Air Force as a waitress at an air base in eastern England when the guns fell silent on November 11, 1918. It was not until 2010 that she was officially recognized as a veteran after a researcher found her service record in Britain's National Archives. Green died Saturday at the Briar House Care Home in King's Lynn, eastern England, two weeks before her 111th birthday, the home said. Retired Air Vice-Marshal Peter Dye, director-general of the RAF Museum, said it was fitting that the last survivor of the first global war was someone who had served on the home front. "In a way, that the last veteran should be a lady and someone who served on the home front is something that reminds me that warfare is not confined to the trenches," Dye said. "It reminds us of the Great War, and all warfare since then has been something that involved everyone. It's a collective experience ... Sadly, whether you are in New York, in London, or in Kandahar, warfare touches all of our lives." She was born Florence Beatrice Patterson in London on February 19, 1901, and joined the newly formed Women's Royal Air Force in September 1918 at the age of 17. The service trained women to work as mechanics, drivers and in other jobs to free men for front-line duty. Green went to work as a steward in the officers' mess, first at the Narborough airdrome and then at RAF Marham in eastern England, and was serving there when the war ended. The photo below was taken in February 2010 at a celebration of Florence's 109th birthday.
Tags: Florence  Patterson  Green  WWI  veteran 
Added: 8th February 2012
Views: 1035
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Posted By: Lava1964
Super Model Jean Shrimpton Then and Now An icon of Swinging London Jean Rosemary Shrimpton is an English model and actress who was one of the first super models and helped launch the mini-dress fad. She has been featured in Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Elle, Ladies' Home Journal, Newsweek, and Time magazines and was one of the highest paid models.
Tags: Super  Model  Jean  Shrimpton  Then  and  Now  Swinging  London    actress  mini  skirt  fad  60 
Added: 31st March 2015
Views: 6561
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Posted By: Cliffy
1961 US Figure Skating Team This group photo of the U.S. figure skating team was taken on February 14, 1961 as they prepared to depart from New York City to Brussels--their first leg on a journey to the world championship in Prague. They never made it. After a seemingly routine flight, the airplane experienced unexpected difficulty while in a holding pattern while awaiting permission to land. The aircraft crashed into a farmer's field in the small town of Berg, Belgium. All 72 people aboard the airplane perished--including the 18 people connected to the U.S. figure skating team. Because of the horrible tragedy, the world championships that year were cancelled.
Tags: figure  skating  plane  crash 
Added: 18th February 2012
Views: 1292
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hal March Hal March, born Harold Mendelson, was best known as the host of the popular 1950s quiz show The $64,000 Question from 1955 to 1958. This TV Guide cover is from August 1955 when the show was ascending to the top of the TV ratings after just three months on the air. Although no scandal was ever associated with the show, The $64,000 Question was axed in 1958 when rigging scandals involving other prime time game shows soured the public's appetite for them. March was also an actor. He appeared on a 1966 episode of The Lucy Show as a comedian whose partner was a very large monkey (played by a man in a monkey suit). March was hoping to make a comeback as a game show host in the fall of 1969 with It's Your Bet, but ill health quashed those plans. After completing about 13 weeks of tapings, March complained of weakness and tiredness. A medical exam confirmed the worst: March, a lifelong heavy smoker, had an advanced case of lung cancer. He died on January 22, 1970 at the age of 49.
Tags: Hal  March  quiz  show  host  actor 
Added: 11th March 2012
Views: 1048
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Posted By: Lava1964

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