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Banana-Blade Hockey Sticks The blades on hockey sticks used to be completely straight. In 1927, Cy Denneny of the Ottawa Senators briefly experimented with a blade he had curved using hot water. Nothing came of it. Four decades later, Stan Mikita of the Chicago Blackhawks partially broke the blade of one of his sticks during a practice. He took a shot with it for kicks. Voila! The puck did some fancy dancing through the air much like a knuckleball does. Mikita and teammate Bobby Hull began experimenting with different versions--some with ridiculous curves they dubbed 'banana blades.' Although they had some obvious drawbacks--accurate passing and backhand shots were much more difficult--the warped pieces of wood immediately became formidable weapons. Of course, the banana blades were universally despised by goalies because the netminders had no idea where the puck was headed. (In all honesty, neither did the shooters!) In an era when some goalies didn't wear masks, there was a serious risk of injury, so the extreme blades were outlawed. Today a curve of only 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch is permitted in organized hockey. A hockey ref once told me that if you put a dime on its edge and it fits under the blade of a stick, the curve is illegal.
Tags: hockey  banana  blades 
Added: 29th November 2010
Views: 2566
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir The Ghost and Mrs Muir was one of those TV programs that was liked by the critics but was generally met with a yawn by the public. It was based on a 1947 movie by the same name. The premise of the sitcom was that a young widowed writer with two children buys a house in Maine that is possessed by the ghost of long-deceased seafarer Captain Daniel Gregg (played by Edward Mulhare). After initial resentment of his house being occupied by strangers, Captain Gregg eventually looks out for the Muir family's best interests. Hope Lange had the starring role of Mrs. Muir and remarkably won Emmys for outstanding actress in a comedy series for each of the seasons the show aired on network TV. A total of 46 episodes were made over two seasons. The first season, 1968-69, aired on NBC. The second season, 1969-70, aired on ABC. Charles Nelson Reilly, before he wore a toupee, played Claymore Gregg, the nephew of the sea captain who sold his uncle's house to Mrs. Muir. This is the opening montage.
Tags: Ghost  and  Mrs  Mrui  TV  sitcom  Emmys 
Added: 3rd August 2017
Views: 295
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Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Larson Beats Press Your Luck Press Your Luck was a CBS daytime game show that ran from 1983 to 1986. It was one of the first game shows to use computer technology. The heart of the game revolved around a large computer-generated prize board. There were 18 'randomly arranged' panels. On average, 15 of the 18 panels contained cash or merchandise prizes. The other three were 'whammies.' If a player stopped the rotating board on a whammy, he lost everything. If a player kept accruing spins, he could keep pressing his luck and accumulate as much money and prizes as he dared. Enter Michael Larson, an out-of-work ice cream vendor from Ohio. Using his VCRs, Larson taped numerous episodes of Press Your Luck and screened them in slow motion. Larson's study habits paid huge dividends: He recognized that the board only generated five patterns. If a player was smart enough to recognize the patterns and time his presses accordingly, a small fortune could be amassed. In a May 1984 taping, Larson did just that. To the amazement of host Peter Tomarken, a studio audience, his two opponents, and CBS brass, Larson made 46 consecutive spins without hitting a whammy. (The odds of such a feat, if it were pure luck, are about 5000 to one.) At a time when most game show winners took home less than $10,000, Larson won $104,950 in cash, a sailboat, and trips to Kauai and the Bahamas-- for a total haul valued at $110,237. Larson's run of whammy-free presses took so long that CBS had to air the show over two episodes (on June 8 and 11). At first CBS was reluctant to award Larson his winnings, but they had no legal grounds to withhold Larson's loot. He had beaten the system fairly. Immediately afterward, the Press Your Luck board patterns were increased to 32 making it much less likely that anyone could memorize them. To see a condensed version of Larson in action, check out another post on this website: http://www.yourememberthat.com/media/14367/Michael_Larson_on_Press_Your_Luck/
Tags: Press  Your  Luck  Michael  Larson  game  show 
Added: 30th November 2010
Views: 1721
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Posted By: Lava1964
Michael Larson on Press Your Luck At Steve's request, here's a compilation of Michael Larson's spins during his remarkable appearance on Press Your Luck in June 1984. Larson had studied numerous hours of Press Your Luck videotapes before becoming a contestant on the show. He figured out there were only five variations of the board and no whammy ever appeared in the fourth spot from the left on the top row nor the middle spot on the right side. Note that Larson hit a whammy on his first 'spin' because he wasn't sure how quickly his stops would register. Once he got the hang of it, though, he was almost unstoppable. CBS was so embarrassed by the situation that the network only aired the Larson episodes once (on June 8 and 11, 1984)--and even refused to let the Game Show Network air them until very recently.
Tags: Michael  Larson  Press  Your  Luck 
Added: 1st December 2010
Views: 1802
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Posted By: Lava1964
FDR Wheelchair Photo 1941 This is a rarity: a photo of FDR in a wheelchair. The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Library has only three photos of FDR in his wheelchair. Roosevelt had been unable to walk since 1921 when he was afflicted with polio. With the help of a willing and co-operative press, Roosevelt managed to conceal his disability from the public for the rest of his life. This photo was taken at Hyde Park in 1941. FDR's shaggy dog, Fala, is on his lap. The girl is the granddaughter of FDR's friend.
Tags: FDR  wheelchair  photo 
Added: 2nd December 2010
Views: 4411
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 3935
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Champs Vs. College All-Stars 1934-1976 The Chicago Charities College All-Star Game was a preseason football tilt played annually (except 1974) from 1934 to 1976 between the National Football League champions and a team of star college seniors from the previous year. (There was one exception: The 1935 game involved the 1934 runner-up Chicago Bears instead of the champion New York Giants.) The game originally was a benefit for Chicago-area charities. Except for the 1943 and 1944 games which were held at Northwestern University, the game was always played at Soldier Field in Chicago. The first game, played before a crowd of 79,432 on August 31, 1934, was a scoreless tie between the all-stars and the Chicago Bears. The following year, a game that included future president Gerald Ford, the Bears won, 5-0. The first all-star win was in 1937 for a squad that featured Sammy Baugh. In the 1940s the games were competitive affairs that attracted large crowds to Soldier Field. But as the talent level of pro football improved, the all-stars had diminishing success. The last all-star win came in 1963, when a team coached by legendary quarterback Otto Graham beat the Green Bay Packers 20-17. By the 1970s, crowds for the event were dwindling. In addition, NFL coaches were reluctant to part with their new draftees (who would miss part of training camp) for a meaningless exhibition in which the players might be injured. A players' strike forced the cancellation of the 1974 game. The last game took place in a torrential downpour on July 23, 1976. Despite featuring stars such as Chuck Muncie, Mike Pruitt, Lee Roy Selmon and Jackie Slater, the collegians were hopelessly outclassed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Pittsburgh was leading 24-0 late in the third quarter when play was suspended due to the awful weather conditions. The game was not restarted. Chicago Tribune Charities Inc., the sponsor of the game, elected not to bring it back for 1977. A program from the 1941 game is shown here. Overall, the NFL teams won 31 of the 42 games. The all-stars won nine. Two games ended in ties.
Tags: football  all-stars  NFL 
Added: 13th December 2010
Views: 36197
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Posted By: Lava1964
Saturday Night Live With Howard Cosell Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was a dreadful variety program that ran on ABC from September 1975 to January 1976. It, of course, was hosted by sports announcer Howard Cosell and produced by Roone Arledge of Monday Night Football fame. It was later remembered by its director Don Mischer as 'one of the greatest disasters in the history of television,' largely due to Cosell and Arledge being unfamiliar with comedy and variety programming. Coincidentally, that same year NBC began airing a late-night comedy show titled Saturday Night. The shows did not directly compete. (Cosell's program aired at 8 p.m. whereas NBC's show aired at 11:30 p.m.) Cosell's show featured Bill Murray, Brian Doyle-Murray, and Christopher Guest as regular comedy performers dubbed 'The Prime Time Players.' In response, the NBC show called its regular performers 'the Not-Ready-For-Prime-Time Players.' Ironically, all three of the original Prime Time Players eventually joined the NBC show. The premiere episode featured celebrity guests Frank Sinatra, Shirley Bassey, Paul Anka, Siegfried and Roy, the cast of the Broadway version of The Wiz, Jimmy Connors, John Denver and the Bay City Rollers (whom Cosell dubbed 'the next British phenomenon'). The show was often hectic and unprepared. In one instance, Arledge learned that Lionel Hampton was in New York City and invited the musician to appear just an hour before airtime. The show fared poorly among critics and audiences alike, with TV Guide calling it 'dead on arrival, with a cringingly awkward host.' Alan King, the show's 'executive in charge of comedy,' admitted it was difficult to turn Cosell into a variety show host, saying Cosell 'made Ed Sullivan look like Buster Keaton.' Saturday Night Live with Howard Cosell was canceled on January 17, 1976, after only 18 episodes. A year later, in 1977, NBC's Saturday Night was renamed Saturday Night Live.
Tags: Saturday  Night  Live  Howard  Cosell  variety  TV 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 2440
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chrysler Turbine The fourth-generation Chrysler turbine engine ran at up to 44,500 revolutions per minute, according to the owner's manual,[1] and could use diesel fuel, unleaded gasoline, kerosene, JP-4 jet fuel, and even vegetable oil. The engine would run on virtually anything and the President of Mexico tested this theory by running one of the first cars—successfully—on tequila. Air/fuel adjustments were required to switch from one to another, and the only evidence of what fuel was being used was the odor of the exhaust.
Tags: Chrysler  Turbine  1963  turbo  engine  jet  engine 
Added: 1st January 2011
Views: 2218
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Posted By: Old Fart
Jackie Wright Jackie Wright is famous to fans of the ribald Benny Hill Show. The diminutive Jackie (all 4-foot-11-inches of him) frequently played the foil in comedy sketches in which Benny rapidly patted his bald head--enhanced with special-effects smacking sounds. Wright, an Irishman, was originally an auto worker and didn't begin acting until he was nearly 60. He was an extra in the screen adaptation of My Fair Lady. (Look for him in the scene where Eliza Doolittle sings Wouldn't It Be Loverly.) Hill thought Wright's stature and face were perfect for comedy. Wright was a regular on the Benny Hill Show for 15 years. Ill health forced him to leave the program in 1983. Wright died five years later in Belfast at age 84.
Tags: Jackie  Wright  Benny  Hill  comedian 
Added: 20th January 2011
Views: 2733
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Posted By: Lava1964

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