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TV Disaster - My Three Sons Final Season My Three Sons ran for 12 seasons (1960 through 1972), first on ABC then on CBS. It is the second-longest running live-action sitcom in American TV history, behind only The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Despite plentiful cast changes, the departure of three major characters, and implausible plot twists, it remained a reliable ratings-grabber year after year. For most of its time on CBS, MTS enjoyed a favorable Saturday 8 p.m. time slot. Prior to what would be its final season, CBS decided to give its hugely popular new series All in the Family the time slot MTS was accustomed to having. MTS was moved to Monday at 10 p.m.--a horrible time for most kids to watch it. In addition to the time change for the twelfth season, a bizarre storyline was introduced: Fred MacMurray, who played family patriarch Steven Douglas, took on a second role--that of his cousin the Laird (Lord) Ferguson McBain Douglas of Sithian Bridge. English actor Alan Caillou's voice was dubbed for MacMurray's whenever Lord Douglas spoke. The plot centered around Lord Douglas' arrival in Los Angeles from Scotland. He came in search of a First Lady to marry and return with him to Scotland. He found Terri Dowling (Anne Francis), a waitress at the Blue Berry Bowling Alley. While initially reluctant to give up her life in America and return to Scotland as royalty, she finally accepted. This odd storyline was a continuation of a plot idea that originally began in the fourth season, when the Douglases visited Scotland on the pretense of having been told they had inherited a castle. With a later time slot--well after many younger MTS fans had gone to bed--the show finished the season outside the Top 30 for only the second time. In an attempt to save the series, CBS moved MTS in midseason to Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Nevertheless, MTS ended its prime-time run in the spring of 1972. Fred MacMurray, bitterly disappointed, protested the show's cancellation to CBS head honcho Fred Silverman, but to no avail. Although MTS was a staple on the rerun circuit for many years, the awful twelfth season was generally not included in the episodes made available for rebroadcast.
Tags: My  Three  Sons  sitcom  plot  twist 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 2315
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Posted By: Lava1964
THE Rotary Phone The rotary dial with holes was first introduced in 1904 but did not enter service in the Bell System until 1919 Have you ever watched an old television show and seen a rotary style telephone sitting on the table? Ever wonder how to use that phone? Well today is your lucky day! You are about to find out how to do just that. 1Remove the handset from the cradle.(The cradle is where the phone rests when not in use) 2Place the handset to your ear and listen for a dial tone. 3Use the index finger from your other hand to dial the first number. Do so by placing the finger in the dial's hole that is above the number you wish to dial. The dial, is also called the finger wheel, is circular. 4Rotate the dial clockwise until your finger touches the metal stop. Remove your finger from the opening to allow the dial to rotate to its original position. 5Find your second number and repeat step three and four. Do this for the remaining numbers. When you are finished with your conversation, simply place the phone back on the cradle. NOTE, If you have long or decorated fingernails, and are concerned that dialing might damage them, you may use the eraser end of a pencil to dial.
Tags: Rotary  Phone  finger  wheel  circular 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 1384
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Posted By: mia_bambina
Good Humor 1940s Tags: Good  Humor  1940s  ice  cream 
Added: 15th July 2012
Views: 5671
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Posted By: Old Fart
Nabisco Saltine Tin Seems like only yesterday.
Tags: Nabisco,  saltine  crackers,  tin 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 1803
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Posted By: Old Fart
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 3044
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Posted By: Lava1964
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Tags: asdf 
Added: 17th July 2001
Views: 295
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Posted By: Cliffy
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 1462
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tootsie Trailer Tags: Home  Video  Videocassette  Trailer  Tootsie  Charles  Evans  Sydney  Pollack  Dick  Richards  Ronald  L.  Schwary  Dustin  Hoffman  Jessica  Lange  Teri  Garr  Dabney  Coleman  Charles  Durning 
Added: 23rd February 2015
Views: 84
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Posted By: Freckles
The Maltese Bippy This is Rowan and Martins attempt at a movie career. This picture was filmed during the height of their Laugh-In success. It is bad but fascinating.
Tags: dan  rowan  dick  martin  laugh-in  comedy 
Added: 20th July 2012
Views: 454
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Posted By: bartguy
Sears Christmas Catalog 1966 Tags: Sears  Christmas  Catalog  1966  Sears,  Roebuck  &  Company  mail  order 
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 520
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Posted By: Cathy