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Hot Dog-Eating Champ Takeru Kobayashi At the prestigious annual Nathan's Hot Dog eating championship in 2001, a skinny, unheralded 23-year-old Japanese contestant named Takeru Kobayashi blew away the field by consuming 50 hot dogs (and buns!) in 12 minutes to double the previous world record. Organizers were so unprepared for Kobayashi's spectacular display of gluttony that they had to resort to hand-written signage to keep track of his astonishing total of devoured dogs. To prove it was no fluke, Kobayashi won the next five Fourth of July Coney Island classics too--with totals of 50, 50.5, 44.5, 53.5 and 53.75 hot dogs respectively. In 2007, despite downing a personal best 63 hot dogs, Kobayashi was upset by American upstart Joey Chestnut. Chestnut also get the better of Kobayashi in 2008 and 2009. In 2010, Kobayashi ran afoul of event organizers when he refused to sign an exclusive contract with Major League Eating, the organization that runs the Coney Island event. Kobayashi was actually arrested as an intruder at the 2010 event when he climbed onstage to congratulate Chestnut on another victory. Kobayashi, nicknamed "The Tsunami" has set several world records in other eating disciplines, such as bratwurst, hamburgers, lobster rolls, and rice balls.
Tags: hot  dog  eating  Takeru  Kobayashi 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 581
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1095
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ted Bessell 1935-1996 Remember actor Ted Bessell? He had hoped to be a pianist; as a youth he performed at Carnegie Hall. However, he drifted towards an acting career. He was best known for portraying Donald Hollinger, the steady romantic interest of Marlo Thomas' character Ann Marie on That Girl. The two became engaged in the 1970 season. That Girl ran from 1966 to 1971. Following that series, Bessell starred in the truly awful sitcom Me and the Chimp, which ran for 13 dreadful episodes in 1972. In 1976, he played Joe, Mary Richard's love interest, in two episodes of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. It appeared that Bessell was going to be added as a permanent MTM cast member (and perhaps become Mary's husband), but it never panned out. Bessell was about to direct the big screen version of Bewitched when he died suddenly of an aneurysm in 1996. He was just 61.
Tags: Ted  Bessell  actor 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 958
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ramon Santiago - Reverse Triple Crown Any baseball fan worth his salt knows that the rare triple crown is attained when a player leads his league in home runs, runs batted in, and batting average in the same season. No one has accomplished the feat in either major league since 1967 when Carl Yastrzemski did it for the Boston Red Sox. However, Ramon Santiago of the pitiful 2003 Detroit Tigers captured the "reverse triple crown." Huh? A reverse triple crown is when a player finishes last in all three categories (and has enough at-bats to qualify for the batting title). Santiago, the Tigers' shortstop in 2003, had two home runs, 29 runs batted in and batted just .225. Those 2003 Tigers finished with a horrendous 43-119 record to set an AL record for most losses in a season. On the brighter side, Santiago led the major leagues that same season with 18 sacrifice bunts.
Tags: baseball  Ramon  Santiago 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1324
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Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 2315
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Posted By: Lava1964
Snap Crackle Pop Tags: Snap  Crackle  Pop  comics  on  aging  aging  gettin  old 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 3023
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Posted By: Cathy
Cliff Richard-- Theme from A Summer Place Tags: Cliff  Richard  Theme  from  A  Summer  Place            Cliff          Richard          Theme          From          Summer          place          Movie          Mack          Discant          Max          Steiner          1959          Sandra          Dee          Troy          Donahue          Grammy          Love          Forever 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 6319
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Posted By: Cathy
Don Grady 1944-2012 I'm surprised that no one had posted anything about the passing of Don Grady. Grady was born Don Louis Agrati on June 8, 1944. He was one of the original Mousketeers from the Mickey Mouse Club. However, Grady was most famous for playing middle son Robbie Douglas on the long-running sitcom My Three Sons from 1960 to 1972. Eldest son Mike, played by Tim Considine, left the cast in 1965. (The storyline had him getting married and moving away.) Thus Robbie assumed the new dynamic of being the oldest brother to Chip and Ernie (who was newly adopted). Grady was a musician whose band, The Greefs, made a handful of appearances on the show. Grady later composed musical arrangements, including the theme for The Phil Donahue Show. He died of bone cancer at age 68 on Wednesday, June 27, 2012.
Tags: Don  Grady  obituary 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 1330
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ernest Borgnine 1917-2012 It has been reported that Oscar-winning actor Ernest Borgnine has died at the age of 95. Renal failure was the cause of death. Borgnine usually played tough characters, but he won his Oscar in 1955 for the title role of Marty, a gentle-hearted butcher who fears he will never find true love because he is unattractive. The movie was made on a small $350,000 budget but became something of a beloved classic. While Borgnine admitted the Oscar did wonders for his acting career, it may have also indirectly led him into disastrous marriages, including one to Ethel Merman which lasted only a month.
Tags: obituary  Ernest  Borgnine 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 608
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Posted By: Lava1964
Silly putty and the comics About Original Silly Putty, has been the standard of excellent fun since 1950. Silly Putty is a very unique substance that kids love and It stretches without breaking, yet it can be snapped off cleanly. It bounces higher than a rubber ball. It floats if you shape.
Tags: SILLY  PUTTY  SUNDAY  MORNING  COMICS 
Added: 8th July 2012
Views: 3061
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Posted By: mia_bambina