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NBC News update Easter 1979 Tags: TV    news    television    update    break    brief    1970s    1979    Jessica    Savitch    network    Easter    Sunday    Pope    Vatican    earthquake    Yugoslavia    Dubrovnik    flood    Jackson    Mississippi    Erik    Estrada    game    show     
Added: 16th April 2009
Views: 2382
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Posted By: Cliffy
Famous Ski Jump Crash The name Vinko Bogataj probably doesn't mean much to you, but I bet you've seen him. Bogataj was the hapless Yugoslavian skier whose spectacular wipeout at a ski flying event in Oberstdorf, West Germany in 1970 was shown on the opening and closing montages on ABC's Wide World Of Sports for years. Ouch! The agony of defeat!
Tags: Vinko  Bogataj  ski  jumper 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 16353
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Posted By: Lava1964
1972 Fischer Spassky World Chess Championship Chess was front page news and on the cover of Time Magazine in the summer of 1972 when American Bobby Fischer challenged world champion Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union. Fischer, 29, had been prominent on the chess scene since 1958 when he won the U.S. championship just before he turned 15. The Soviet Union had dominated international chess for 25 years, but Spassky was bamboozled by Fischer's unpredictable openings. Fischer clinched the 24-game match, held in Reykjavik, Iceland, after 21 games with a record of seven wins, three losses, and eleven draws. Fischer's victory generated tremendous interest in the game in the United States. Known as the 'Fischer Boom,' membership numbers in the U.S. Chess Federation reached their peak in the following two years. The eccentric Fischer never defended his title. He opted to resign as world champion in 1974 when not all of his 64 conditions to defend against Anatoly Karpov were accepted by chess' governing body. Since then Fischer has been a recluse. He did make an appearance in 1992 to play his old rival Spassky in a specially arranged match in Yugoslavia. (This violated UN sanctions against Yugoslavia at the time.) Fischer won the match and proclaimed he was still the legitimate world champion. Despite having Jewish ancestry, Fischer is an anti-Semite and a passionate Holocaust denier. Fischer called a Manila talk-radio station to applaud the 9/11 terrorist attacks in a profanity-filled rant. Fischer now lives in Iceland where he was granted citizenship.
Tags: Bobby  Fischer  Boris  Spassky  chess 
Added: 12th December 2007
Views: 1730
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Posted By: Lava1964
Manchester United Plane Disaster - 1958 One of the great sports tragedies of the twentieth century was the Munich Air Disaster. It occurred on February 6, 1958, when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On board the plane was the glamorous Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes" (after manager Matt Busby), along with a few supporters and sports journalists. Twenty of the 44 people on board the aircraft died instantly in the crash. The injured, some of whom had been knocked unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in a total of 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, against Red Star Belgrade, but had to make a stop in Munich to refuel the aircraft. After refuelling, the pilots, Captains James Thain and Kenneth Rayment, attempted to take off twice, but had to abandon both attempts due to boost surging in the port engine. Fearing that they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off attempt. By the time of the third attempt, it had begun to snow, causing a layer of slush to build up at the end of the runway. When the aircraft hit the slush, it lost velocity, making take-off impossible. It plowed through a fence past the end of the runway, before the port wing hit a nearby house and was torn off. Fearing that the aircraft might explode, Captain Thain set about getting the surviving passengers as far away as possible. Despite this threat, Manchester United goalkeeper Harry Gregg remained behind to pull survivors from the wreckage. An investigation by West German airport authorities originally blamed Captain Thain for the crash, claiming that he had failed to deice the wings of the aircraft, despite statements to the contrary from eyewitnesses. It was later established that the crash had, in fact, been caused by the build-up of slush on the runway, which had resulted in the aircraft being unable to achieve take-off velocity. Accordingly Thain's name was eventually cleared in 1968--a decade after the incident. At the time of the disaster, Manchester United were trying to become only the third club to win three successive English league titles; they were six points behind League leaders Wolverhampton Wanderers with 14 games to go. They were also holders of the Charity Shield and had just advanced into their second successive European Cup semi-final. The team was also on an 11-match unbeaten run, and had advanced to the Fifth Round of the FA Cup tournament two weeks before the crash. Real Madrid won the European Cup in 1958, but team officials generously offered to have Manchester United declared the winners. This plan was not approved by UEFA, however. Manchester United did win the European Cup ten years later. Two of the survivors from 1958 were on that 1968 team.
Tags: soccer  Manchester  United  disaster  airplane 
Added: 7th June 2012
Views: 4139
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Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3568
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Posted By: Lava1964
1973 Wimbledon Boycott In May 1973 Nikola (Niki) Pilic, Yugoslavia's number-one-ranked male tennis player, was suspended by his national tennis association. The governing body claimed he had refused to play in a Davis Cup tie for Yugoslavia against New Zealand earlier that month. Today tennis players routinely turn down invitations to play for their countries in Davis Cup competition, but back in 1973 it was considered a big no-no--especially in an eastern European country. Pilic denied he had done so. Be that as it may, Pilic was initially suspended for nine months. Yugoslavia's suspension was supported by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF), but it was later reduced to just one month. Nevertheless, that month happened to be when the prestigious Wimbledon championships took place. Thus, Pilic would not be permitted to play at Wimbledon. The recently formed men's players union, the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), stated that if Pilic was not allowed to compete, none of its membership should compete. As a result, 81 of the top players, including reigning champion Stan Smith, boycotted Wimbledon in 1973 to protest Pilic's suspension. The initial seeding for the men's draw had already taken place. Thirteen of the 16 men's seeds withdrew. This resulted in an enormous number of qualifiers and lucky losers getting into the main draw. Three leading ATP players, Ilie Nastase, Roger Taylor and Ray Keldie, defied the boycott and were fined by the ATP's disciplinary committee. Also among those who chose to play were two rising stars: Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors, who each advanced to the quarterfinals. Despite the boycott, the attendance of 300,172 was the second highest in Wimbledon's history at that time. The eventual men's champion was Jan Kodes of Czechoslovakia. He defeated Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union 6-1, 9-8, 6-3 in the final. (Tiebreakers were played at 8-8 in those days.) Kodes is shown here planting a kiss on the championship trophy.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  boycott 
Added: 15th September 2012
Views: 3345
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 1897
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Posted By: Lava1964

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