Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Holiday Inn 1967 check out the yellow Caddie in the far left . . my Dad had one of those when i was growing up . . it was indestructible . . i HATED the color of the car then . . referred to it as bird-#!$& yellow . . Dad didn't think much of that either!! LOL
Tags: holiday  inn 
Added: 27th December 2008
Views: 1167
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Yellow River Christie
Tags: Christie  Yellow  River 
Added: 22nd February 2009
Views: 824
Rating:
Posted By: donmac101
Donovan  Mellow Yellow On 24 October 1966, Epic released the rollicking, brass-laden single "Mellow Yellow", arranged by John Paul Jones and purportedly featuring Paul McCartney on uncredited backing vocals. It was rumoured that the phrase "electrical banana" referred to smoking banana peels to get high. Look for the guy lighting up!
Tags: Donovan    Mellow  Yellow 
Added: 14th April 2009
Views: 1448
Rating:
Posted By: rickfmdj
Loving Vs Virginia 1967 In June 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia. Shortly after their marriage, the Lovings returned to Virginia and established their marital abode in Caroline County. That October a grand jury issued an indictment charging the Lovings with violating Virginia's 1924 ban on interracial marriages. On January 6, 1959, the Lovings pleaded guilty to the charge and were sentenced to one year in jail; however, the trial judge suspended the sentence for a period of 25 years on the condition that the Lovings leave the state and not return to Virginia together for 25 years. He stated in an opinion that: 'Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. And but for the interference with his arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix.' After their convictions, the Lovings took up residence in the District of Columbia. On November 6, 1963, they filed a motion in the state trial court to vacate the judgment and set aside the sentence on the ground that the statutes which they had violated were repugnant to the Fourteenth Amendment. No decison was rendered for four years. Finally, in 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled (in a 9-0 verdict) that race could not be used as grounds to deny marriage. At the time, 17 U.S. states had laws on the books prohibiting interracial marriages. Richard Loving was killed in a car crash in 1975. Mildred Loving died in 2008.
Tags: civil  law  interracial  marriage 
Added: 17th December 2010
Views: 901
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bananadine Hoax 1967 Bananadine is a fictional psychoactive substance which is supposedly extracted from banana peels. A hoax recipe for its extraction from banana peels was originally published in the Berkeley Barb in March 1967. It became more widely known when William Powell, believing it to be true, reproduced the method in The Anarchist Cookbook in 1970. The original hoax was designed to raise questions about the ethics of making psychoactive drugs illegal and prosecuting those who took them: 'What if the common banana contained psychoactive properties, how would the government react?" One book of one-liner joke comics, published in 1971, contained a comic in which a teen is secretly handing bunches of bananas to a zoo gorilla at night, uttering the line, 'Just throw the skins back, man!' Researchers at New York University have found that banana peel contains no intoxicating chemicals, and that smoking it produces only a placebo effect. Over the years, there has been considerable speculation regarding the psychoactive properties of banana skins. Donovan's hit single Mellow Yellow was released a few months prior to the Berkeley Barb article, and in the popular culture of the era, the song was assumed to be about smoking banana peels. Shortly after the 'Berkeley Barb' and the song, bananadine was featured in the New York Times.
Tags: hoax  bananadine  narcotics  bananas 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 1623
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1968 VW Funky Flowers Includes Mellow Yellow and Out of Sight White colors!
Tags: 1968  VW  Flower  Stickers  Sixties  Advertisement  SeventeenMagazine 
Added: 8th October 2011
Views: 1352
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
NY Giants 1st Home Game The Giants first home game was at the Polo Grounds on October 18, 1925, against the Frankford Yellow Jackets. When the Giants played their first game at the Meadowlands in New Jersey on October 10, 1976 the opponent was the Dallas Cowboys and a souvenir gift pack included a bumper sticker saying “Giants Stadium I Was There Opening Day,” a stadium picture, a small New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority flag, and a reprint of the October 18, 1925 program.
Tags:  
Added: 5th February 2012
Views: 1177
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1746
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Tie A Yellow Ribbon - 1973 In 1972 songwriter Irwin Levine read a newspaper story about a prisoner who was overcome with angst as his pending release from jail drew nearer. He was deeply concerned that his wife would not want to remain married after his long absence from her. The prisoner, in advance of his release, asked his wife to provide a symbol of acceptance before he arrived home. Levine and co-writer L. Russell Brown took the story and turned it into one of the truly great songs from the 1970s: Tie A Yellow Ribbon (Round The Ole Oak Tree). It was recorded by Tony Orlando and Dawn, a group which hadn't had a major hit song in nearly three years. It sold three million copies in two weeks. The song revived the group and led to their getting a CBS variety show that began as a summer replacement program in 1974 and lasted for two seasons. Tie A Yellow Ribbon reached the top of the charts in April 1973 and remained there for a month. It had equal success in the UK where it sold more than one million copies and hit the top of the charts there too. According to one source, it was the second most covered song of the 1970s, trailing only Yesterday by the Beatles. It's a classic upbeat singalong tune that is a favorite at karaoke parties. Tie A Yellow Ribbon has frequently been used to welcome home troops from overseas since the 1980s. This clip shows Tony Orlando and Dawn performing it. I bet you can't listen to it without singing along!
Tags: Tie  A  Yellow  Ribbon  Tony  Orlando  Dawn 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 872
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1901 Exhumation of Abraham Lincoln Here's a weird factoid: Since his assassination in 1865, Abraham Lincoln's remains have been exhumed or disinterred 17 times--and his coffin has been opened five times. Some of the exhumations have been totally understandable. His body was moved in and out of several temporary vaults while awaiting "permanent" burial. One unplanned exhumation happened in 1876. Lincoln's coffin was removed from its marble sarcophagus by a group of grave robbers who were caught almost immediately. Other times the Lincoln Tomb fell into a state of disrepair because the ground in was built upon was too soft. Thus Lincoln's body was removed and shabbily stored in the structure's basement pending the reconstruction work. Each time the coffin itself was actually disturbed, the guardians insisted on opening the casket to ensure Lincoln's remains were actually still inside. The last time this occurred was in 1901 when more renovations were done on Lincoln's deteriorating tomb to make the location more visitor friendly. Lincoln's coffin--which had been encased in a steel cage and buried beneath 10 feet of concrete as a means of discouraging grave robbers--was once more exhumed during the renovations. About 23 workers were on hand to see Lincoln re-interred one last time on September 26, 1901. Out of curiosity they checked the coffin once more to see if Abe was still there. He was. Although his face had turned a chalky white color, the corpse was remarkably well preserved after more than 36 years. Witnesses said that Lincoln's eyebrows were missing and the gloves upon his hands had rotted. Otherwise the face was instantly recognizable to anyone who had ever seen a photo of the famous president. It still bore the famous whiskers, mole, and a full head of wiry hair. The suit Lincoln was buried in--the same one he had worn to his 1865 inauguration--was still intact although it was covered in a fine yellow mold. There were also shreds of a disintegrated American flag upon the corpse. The last living person to have seen Lincoln's corpse was a 14-year-old boy named Fleetwood Lindley. Lindley's father had been one of the construction workers and had urged him to leave school early that day and go to Lincoln's Tomb to see something he would never forget. The boy was also permitted to hold one of the straps that lowered Lincoln's coffin back into its concrete cocoon. Interviewed by the Chicago Tribune about the experience in 1962, Lindley said seeing Lincoln's corpse did not bother him at first, but he said he had trouble sleeping for months afterward. Lindley died in February 1963 at the age of 75 just a few days after giving a final interview on the subject.
Tags: Abraham  Lincoln  exhumation  1901 
Added: 21st July 2015
Views: 2228
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 [2] 3 of 3 | Random