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The Jokers Wild Hals Suit. This guy rubs his suit for luck!
Tags: How  Lucky  can  ya  get! 
Added: 6th May 2008
Views: 1145
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
The Frisco Kid  Gene Wilder The greatest cowboy ever to ride into the Wild West... from Poland!! One of my all time favorites! Gene Wilder and Harrison Ford.
Tags: the  firsco  kid  gene  wilder  harrison  ford 
Added: 31st May 2008
Views: 1332
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Wild Wild West Unused Pilot Open This is the opening sequence for the unused pilot of The Wild Wild West. At the time, it was simply known as The Wild West.
Tags: Wild  Wild  West  Robert  Conrad  James  Gregory  1960s  CBS  Opening  Credits  Sequence  Title 
Added: 11th June 2008
Views: 1384
Rating:
Posted By: BadWX
Notre Dame Four Horsemen 1924 Notre Dame defeated Army 13-7 in a college football game on October 18, 1924. Grantland Rice of the New York Herald-Tribune began his eloquent report this way: 'Outlined against a blue-grey October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.' Rice's article was terrific, but what really made Notre Dame's Four Horsemen famous was this photograph. Once the victorious Irish arrived back on campus, team publicity man George Strickler posed Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden atop horses borrowed from a local livery stable. The photograph was widely circulated and Notre Dame's 1924 backfield became legendary.
Tags: Notre  Dame  Four  Horsemen 
Added: 16th June 2008
Views: 2186
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lassie and Timmy in the Matrix Tags: Lassie  &  Timmy  in  the  Matrix  security    ge    bullet    time    wildcat    matrix   
Added: 18th June 2008
Views: 1233
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Cardiff Giant Hoax 1869 The first great hoax in American history was the Cardiff Giant. In 1868, a wealthy American tobacconist and atheist named George Hull got into an argument with a minister about a passage in the book of Genesis that claimed that giant men once walked the earth. Inspired, Hull decided to create a fake petrified giant and foist it on the gullible public. He hired men in Fort Dodge, Iowa to carve him a 10-foot long block of gypsum. (Hull told them it was for a monument to Abraham Lincoln.) Hull sent the gypsum block to a stonecutter in Chicago to have it secretly carved into the likeness of a man. Once the work was completed, Hull had the carving sent to his cousin's farm in Cardiff, New York. There Hull artificially aged his giant with acid and buried it in the ground for 11 months. On October 16, 1869, two men hired to dig a well 'found' the giant. (This photo shows it being 'exhumed' from Hull's hiding place.) The story of the giant's discovery spread like wildfire. Hull initially charged the curious public 25 cents apiece to view the giant. He later upped the price to 50 cents. Despite scientists universally claiming the Cardiff Giant to be a hoax, Hull sold it for $37,500 to a five-man syndicate headed by David Hannon and laughed all the way to the bank. (The hoax had cost Hull about $2,600, so the sale netted him more than 14 times what he had spent!) P.T. Barnum tried to buy or rent the giant from Hannon for $60,000, but his offer was refused. Not to be outdone, Barnum had his own giant made, displayed it at his museum, and declared Hannon's giant was a fake! On December 10, Hull publicly confessed to his hoax. Meanwhile Hannon and Barnum were busily suing and countersuing each other over who possessed the real Cardiff Giant. Only in America...
Tags: Cardiff  Giant  hoax 
Added: 10th July 2008
Views: 13718
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Match Game Richard Dawson Wont Smile A lot of the fun and frivolity on Match Game vanished in 1978 when Richard Dawson began to act surly. He had been hosting the wildly successful Family Feud since 1976 and had grown tired of his panelist role on Match Game. By 1978 Dawson's cold demeanor was adversely affecting Match Game. Watch what happens when some audience members ask him to smile.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson 
Added: 15th September 2008
Views: 2210
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bar Stool Makers on Whats My Line Two contestants who manufacture bar stools have the What's My Line panel bewildered on the June 2, 1957 episode.
Tags: Whats  My  Line  bar  stools 
Added: 4th May 2009
Views: 1339
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Last Public Guillotine Execution 1939 Beginning in 1793, death by guillotine was the official method of capital punishment in France. Public executions were the norm and attracted large, enthusiastic crowds. The last criminal to be publicly executed in France was multiple murderer Eugen Weidmann who lost his head on June 17, 1939. His execution was clandestinely filmed by a spectator from his apartment window. (This photo is a frame of that film.) The wild exuberance of the crowd prompted the French government to cease all further public executions. Still, the death penalty remained on the books in France until 1981. The last guillotine customer was torture-murderer Hamida Djandoubi who assumed room temperature, away from the eyes of the public, on September 10, 1977.
Tags: capital  punishment  guillotine  France 
Added: 12th May 2009
Views: 4308
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dempsey-Firpo Fight 1923 Quite simply this was the wildest world heavyweight tile fight of all time: Jack Dempsey defends his title versus Argentina's Luis Firpo at New York City's Polo Grounds on September 14, 1923. This edited version of the events doesn't tell the whole story. There were actually nine knockdowns in the first round and two more in the second! In an Associated Press poll in 1950, sports writers declared this bout to be the most exciting sports contest in the first half of the twentieth century.
Tags: boxing  Jack  Dempsey  Luis  Firpo 
Added: 11th February 2009
Views: 2117
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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