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Bat Girl Julie Newmar, Lee Meriwether and Eartha Kitt all played cat Woman in the television series Batman in the 60's
Tags: Who  is  this? 
Added: 9th February 2008
Views: 1420
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Posted By: Marty6697
Lionel Richie and Helium Gas Recorded on the German show Wetten Dass. Lionel sings his classic song Hello, after breathing in Helium. I prefer the original oxygen version! According to Wiki, Wetten Dass is the most popular TV show in Europe. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetten,_dass..%3F
Tags: lionel  richie  helium  gas  german  show 
Added: 21st February 2008
Views: 1294
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Posted By: Tony
Betsy Wetsy I know i had one. How about you Naomi?
Tags: Betsy  Wetsy 
Added: 1st June 2008
Views: 1240
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Posted By: roseanns1
Love Is All around The original of this song was recorded by the Troggs but I much prefer this version by Wet Wet Wet (Scots) which was used on the soundtrack to Four Weddings And A Funeral. It also reached #1 in the UK charts in 1994.
Tags: Wet  Wet  Wet  Love  Is  All  Around 
Added: 2nd September 2008
Views: 1241
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Posted By: donmac101
Pray We Meet Again ... this picture of you I carry in my hand Lets me hear you say You're never far away You'll see me in a dream across a mountain stream And you will hear me say You're never far away" -- Jack White (Never Far Away - Cold Mountain) Video Clips Miramax Films Academy Award Winning Film Cold Mountain Directed by: Anthony Minghella Photos Library of Congress - The Selected Civil War Collection Robert J. Szabo http://www.robertszabo.com/ Jeff Rinehart http://www.flickr.com/people/jeffrine... John L. Smith http://www.smithphotopro.com D. Langley http://www.flickr.com/photos/18367251... Alan Diaz http://flickr.com/people/sunsetsailor/ Cary Jones Crawford http://flickr.com/people/geaux/ Family Old Photos http://www.familyoldphotos.com/civil/ The Phillip Pitzer Collection Lucy Collyar Gordon Collection Bridgeville Veterans of Civil War Music the battle at devil's den Randy Edelman you will be my ain true love Sting performed by Alison Krause without the words Gabriel Yared men of honor Randy Edelman conceived and produced by Dale Caruso
Tags: Civil    War    Vintage    Photos    Wet    Plate    Photography     
Added: 27th September 2008
Views: 1866
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Catwomen- Julie Newmar  Lee Meriwether and Eartha Kitt Sad to see Eartha Kitt leave us, there were 3 Catwomen on Batman in that short series.
Tags: Catwomen-  Julie  Newmar    Lee  Meriwether  and  Eartha  Kitt    Batman 
Added: 26th December 2008
Views: 1140
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Posted By: Old Fart
Loch Ness Monster Photo 1934 Although reports of a strange aquatic creature inhabiting Scotland's Loch Ness have been around since the seventh century A.D., the first purported photo of 'Nessie' did not appear until this image was published in the Daily Mail on April 21, 1934. It became known as the 'surgeon's photo' because the picture was sent to the newspaper by Dr. Robert Kenneth Wilson, a gynecologist, who insisted on anonymity. Sixty years later the photo was revealed to be a hoax. The image was created with a submerged toy submarine and a head and neck sculpted of plastic wood (a material commonly used in model construction). Sculptor Christian Spurling made the creation at the request of Marmaduke Wetherell, a big-game hunter who had been mocked by the Daily Mail. Wetherell used Dr. Wilson as a go-between to get the hoax published in the newspaper.
Tags: Loch  Ness  Monster  photo  hoax 
Added: 7th November 2009
Views: 2498
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hal Block WML Outcast Hal Block was a regular panelist on What's My Line? from 1950 to 1953. He started his career as a joke writer in Chicago and once toured overseas with Bob Hope. He was not well liked by the other WML panelists because of his lack of dignity. Years later Bennett Cerf referred to Block as 'a clod.' WML producer Gil Fates recalled, 'Hal was a strange man. He was rumored to have come from a very wealthy family in Chicago, where he wrote material for some of the standout, stand-up comics in the business. He was stocky with curly black hair, heavy lips, and rather bulging eyes. He wore bow ties, stood around with his hands clasped behind his back, and smiled most of the time. He seemed completely uninhibited by either sensitivity or propriety. He referred to Ethel Barrymore as 'you doll' and planted big wet kisses on both Sister Kenny and Helen Hayes as they passed down the panel to say goodbye. For our deodorant sponsor he gratuitously coined the phrase, 'Make your armpit a charmpit.' Hal was totally oblivious to the panel's distaste for his jokes or to the icy correctness with which John Daly would greet one of his appalling observations. 'You're the prettiest nun I ever saw,' he once complimented a Dominican Sister in full habit. 'So what was so wrong?' he asked in defense. 'She was a real doll.' You couldn't teach the meaning of good taste to Hal any more than StarKist could teach it to Charlie the Tuna. Hal's relationship to the show was much like that of the small-town, stay-at-home wife to her rising young corporate executive husband. Hal had served his purpose when the program was young, but now that we were a class product his gaucheries were no longer tolerable.' In March 1953 Block was quietly replaced on the WML panel by the much more urbane Steve Allen. Block died, pretty much forgotten, from injuries he suffered in an apartment fire, in 1981 at age 67.
Tags: Hal  Block  Whats  My  Line  panelist 
Added: 17th November 2009
Views: 3275
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Posted By: Lava1964
Declaration of Independence Copy Found in Picture Frame Fans of flea markets and garage sales were heartened by this improbable story from the spring of 1991: A collector who spent $4 at a Pennsylvania flea market two years ago for a dismal painting because he liked the frame is the possessor of a rare first printing of the Declaration of Independence. It is valued somewhere between $800,000 and $1 million. David N. Redden, head of the book and manuscript department at Sotheby's in Manhattan, described the document, found behind the painting when the collector took the frame apart, as an 'unspeakably fresh copy' of the declaration. 'The fact that it has been in the backing of the frame preserved it,' he said. Of the 24 copies known to survive, only three are in private hands. Mr. Redden said the unidentified owner bought the painting, 'a dismal dark country scene with a signature he could not make out,' only for its gilded and ornately carved frame. He told Mr. Redden that he discarded the painting, which he disliked. When he realized the frame was crudely made and unsalvageable he got rid of it too. 'But he kept the declaration, which he had found behind the painting,' Mr. Redden said. 'It was folded up, about the size of a business envelope. He thought it might be an early 19th-century printing and worth keeping as a curiosity.' Recently the owner showed it to a friend 'who urged him to look into it further,' said Selby Kiffer, an Americana printing specialist at Sotheby's 'At that point he called us.' Said Kiffer, 'The discovery of any first-printing copy of the declaration, even a fragmentary one or a poor copy, would be exciting, but on this one, the condition is beyond reproach. It was folded up when we first saw it--the way the owner said it was in the painting, less than one-tenth of an inch thick. I had to agree with him it was just as well that he kept it that way. There has been absolutely no restoration, no repair. It was unframed and unbacked.' Only seven of the 24 copies are unbacked, he said, which increases their value. 'The ink was still wet on this copy when it was folded,' Mr. Kiffer said. The very first line -- 'In Congress, July 4, 1776' -- shows up in the bottom margin in reverse, as a faint offsetting or shadow printing, one more proof of the urgency John Dunlap, the printer, and others felt in dispersing this document.
Tags: Declaration  of  Independence  copy  found 
Added: 10th February 2011
Views: 5947
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Posted By: Lava1964
Offensive Words Expunged From Scrabble Dictionary In 1993, Judith Grad, a kitchen-table Scrabble enthusiast was horrified to discover that the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary (OSPD) contained racial, religious, and ethnic slurs along with common vulgarities and obscenities. She wrote letters of complaint to Hasbro (the company that owns Scrabble) and Merriam-Webster, the publisher of OSPD. The general response was that although some words were certainly offensive, they were still words that could be found in any collegiate-level dictionary. Moreover, their meanings were irrelevant to the game. Unsatisfied, Grad contacted the Anti-Defamation League of B'Nai Brith, the NAACP, and the Zionist Organization of America. That, combined with a letter-writing campaign organized by the National Council of Jewish Women, brought the 'offensive word issue' some mainstream publicity. Without consulting Merriam-Webster or the National Scrabble Association (NSA), Hasbro chairman Alan Hassenfeld, in a knee-jerk reaction, announced that '50 to 100 words' would be expunged when the next edition of OSPD was published. Predictably, serious tournament Scrabble players went nuts, accusing Hasbro of caving into censorship, political correctness and the 'language police.' A petition bearing the signatures of more than 800 tournament players was presented to Hasbro demanding Hassenfeld's decision be reversed. At the 1994 U.S. National Scrabble Championship in Los Angeles, an angry mob of more than 200 players vociferously declared their opposition to any expurgation and vowed to quit the game or even sue the NSA if any words were removed from the lists because of political correctness. An acceptable compromise was reached: Starting in 1996 a separate Official Word List (OWL)--without definitions--would be made available to tournament players through the NSA, while a sanitized OSPD would be sold to the general public. OSPD would contain no offensive words and a not-too-prominent disclaimer that it was only 'official' for school and recreational play. Since offensiveness is highly subjective, determining the words that were eventually expunged from OSPD was itself controversial. Brace yourself: Among the 303 'naughty' words you'll no longer see in OSPD are FATSO, LIBBERS, REDSKIN, GRINGO, BAZOOMS, COMSYMP, POONTANG, WETBACK, PAPIST, BADASS, REDNECK, BULLDYKE and STIFFIE.
Tags: Scrabble  words  censorship  political  correctness 
Added: 8th March 2011
Views: 3373
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Posted By: Lava1964

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