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London Blitz Photo - 1940 Think we had it tough in North America during the Second World War? We could sleep in our beds at night reasonably certain we weren't going to be blown to smithereens. No so our British allies. This remarkable color photo from October 14, 1940 shows the effects of a typical nighttime air raid targetting London. (The Brits referred to it as "the Blitz.") A large German bomb blew a hole in a street near a bus stop, penetrated through to the Belham underground (subway) station below ground, and killed 68 people who thought they were out of harm's way. Later that same night, a bus travelling in blackout conditions--and thus unaware of the enormous hole in the street--drove into the gaping crater.
Tags: blitz  London  Second  World  War 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 4193
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Aberfan Disaster - 1966 At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21, 1966 a enormous mountain of excavated coal mining debris (known to coal miners as a waste tip) slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan, near Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales. The waste tips, which had been building up for 50 years, had become heavy and saturated due to a week of rainy weather. The debris slide first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been repeatedly stolen. (The Tribunal of Inquiry later established that the disaster happened so quickly that a telephone warning would not have saved any lives regardless.) Down in the village, nobody saw anything, but everybody heard the noise as about 40,000 cubic metres of debris crashed into the school at a depth of 39 feet. Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old student, remembered four years later, "It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes." The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Then there was total silence. George Williams, who was trapped in the wreckage, remembered that "In that silence you couldn't hear a bird or a child." All able-bodied persons in the village rushed to the scene with whatever implements they could find to begin digging through the mess to search for survivors. None were found after 11 a.m., but it took nearly a week to recover all the bodies. The death toll in the Aberfan disaster was 144--of which 116 were school children. That accounted for about half the school's enrolment. Five teachers were killed too. An inquiry later blamed the National Coal Board (NCB) for ignoring warnings from years earlier about the potential hazards of the growing waste tips. Families of the victims were eventually compensated 500 British pounds by the NCB for each loved one who had perished.
Tags: Aberfan  Wales  disaster  coal 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2527
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Whats My Line - Syndicated Years After a prime time run on CBS of more than 17 years (1950 to 1967), the popular panel show What's My Line? was resurrected by its creators as a syndicated program from 1968 to 1975. Beloved host John Daly was not interested in the hectic schedule of five shows per week (all done in one day), so Washington political reporter Wally Bruner was brought in as the new moderator. Classy Arlene Francis returned as a regular panelist. Bennett Cerf apppeared occasionally until his death in 1971. Soupy Sales became the regular male panelist. He proved to be an amusing and excellent game player who seemed to know every mystery guest no matter what field he/she happened to be in. The syndicated version was less refined than the CBS version. Games were deliberately shortened to allow the contestants to display their unusual occupations--something that almost never happened on the old version. Therefore if a contestant was a fire eater or a wine taster, there was invariably a demonstration of his/her talent. Bruner hosted WML for four years but admittedly was not fond of New York City nor the showbiz scene and was happy to bow out gracefully. Larry Blyden, best known as a Broadway actor, took over as moderator in 1972 for the show's last three seasons, and was much more comfortable hobnobbing with celebrities than Bruner was. Providing halfway decent mystery guests five shows per week proved to be a huge challenge. Executive producer Gil Fates charitably referred to some of the so-called celebrities as "owls" because often the studio audience and some of the panelists would quietly say "who?" when the mystery guest was not particularly famous. The final shows were taped just before Christmas in 1974 and aired throughout the spring of 1975. Towards the end, declining ratings and aging audience demographics made WML a tough sell to local TV stations. Blyden was slated to host Showoffs, another game show, when he was tragically killed in an auto accident while vacationing in Morocco in June 1975--which absolutely sealed the finish of WML. The syndicated WML simply faded away with none of the sentimental fanfare the CBS version had in its 1967 finale. In his book on the history of WML, Fates ruefully admits the last episode of the syndicated show was "a bomb." There have been no serious attempts to revive WML since 1975, although a retrospective program was made later that year--co-hosted by John Daly and Arlene Francis--to mark WML's 25 years on the air.
Tags: TV  syndicated  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th June 2012
Views: 1772
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
AfterMASH TV networks can't leave well enough alone. In February 1983, MASH exited the airwaves in a blaze of glory after 11 successful and brilliant seasons of quality television. Seven months later, CBS reunited a few of its characters in a sequel titled AfterMASH. (The title was intended to be a pun on "aftermath".) The show was set immediately following the end of the Korean War and chronicled the adventures of three characters from the original series: Colonel Potter (played by Harry Morgan), Klinger (Jamie Farr) and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher). By several quirks of fate, all three end up working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri. Rosalind Chao rounded out the starring cast as Soon-Lee Klinger, a Korean refugee whom Klinger met in the last two episodes of MASH and married at the end of the series. AfterMASH premiered on September 26, 1983 in the same Monday night 9:00 p.m. EST. time slot that MASH once had. Curious and faithful MASH fans provided vast audience numbers for that first broadcast. AfterMASH debuted at #1 in the weekly TV ratings--the first time a new show had done that since Laverne and Shirley. It finished 10th out of all network shows for the 1983-1984 season according to Nielsen Media Research television ratings. For its second season CBS disastrously moved the show to Tuesday nights at 8:00 p.m. EST., opposite NBC's top-ten hit The A-Team. CBS launched an optimistic marketing campaign featuring illustrations by Sanford Kossin of Max Klinger in a nurse's uniform, shaving off Mr. T's signature mohawk, theorizing AfterMASH would take a large portion of The A-Team's audience. The exact opposite occurred: AfterMASH's ratings plummeted to near the bottom of the television rankings and the show was canceled just nine episodes into its second season. Twenty-nine AfterMASH episodes had aired, one was shown as late as May 1985. A thirtieth episode was completed but was never broadcast. Comparisons to the original MASH were inevitable and largely unfavorable. In 2002, TV Guide listed AfterMASH, perhaps uncharitably, as the seventh-worst TV series ever.
Tags: TV  AfterMASH  sequel 
Added: 19th June 2012
Views: 1843
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bob Richards 1956-1994 Bob Richards was born as Robert L. Schwartz, He was the Chief Meteorologist at KSDK in 1983 to 1994, He grew up in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Before KSDK he was a Meteorologist at The Weather Channel through 1982 to 1983, also earned the Seal Of Apporval from the American Meteorological Society, But his tormented and embarrassment of his affair becoming public. On March 23rd, 1994, Richards took off his private plane from Spirit of St. Louis Airport and crash his plane to the ground, and he was killed, He committed suicide.
Tags: 1994  Bob  Richards  Meteorologist  KSDK  St  Louis  Missouri  1983  American  Meteorological  Society  Chief 
Added: 20th June 2012
Views: 4448
Rating:
Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Condo -  1983 Sitcom Disaster McLean Stevenson's sixth and final sitcom in the space of 15 years was the short-lived ABC show Condo, which aired for four months in 1983. The premise of the show was that James Kirkridge (Stevenson), a middle-aged insurance salesman, was experiencing a gradual reversal in finances. Accordingly, his family had to downgrade their lifestyle so much that he and his wife Kiki (Brooke Alderson) had to sell their rambling, palatial house in the suburbs and downsize. Jesse Rodriguez (Luis Avalos), an upwardly mobile native of the Los Angeles barrio, had recently become a successful owner of a landscaping business, enabling he and his wife Maria (Yvonne Wilder) to trade up to a more upscale neighborhood. Both couples ended up purchasing condominium units right outside a quaint Los Angeles-area fairway, and became each other's not-so-neighborly next-door neighbors. The Kirkridges initially mistook the Rodriguezes as the condo's groundskeepers. When Jesse informed them that he and his clan were in fact owners of the condo next door, weariness and bigotry ensued, mostly from staunch traditionalist James. Kiki, slightly daffy but strong enough to keep James from stepping too much out of line, was a little more accepting of her Hispanic neighbors, but often experienced culture shock causing occasional friction between her and feisty Maria. There was a Romeo-and-Juliet aspect to the show: The older Kirkridge son fell in love with and married the Rodriguez daughter. Condo was rare for its time as it had an animated opening sequence. Disliked by TV critics and viewers alike, Condo was yanked by ABC after just 13 episodes. Marc Price, who played the younger Kirkridge son, moved on to play Skippy Handelman, the Keatons' awkward yet lovable next-door-neighbor in Family Ties.
Tags: Condo  TV  sitcom 
Added: 21st June 2012
Views: 2393
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dawn - Portrait of a Teenage Runaway In 1976, Eve Plumb, two years removed from The Brady Bunch, played the lead role in the made-for-TV movie Dawn: Portrait of a Teeange Runaway. It aired on Monday, September 27, 1976. The previous year NBC had been successful with Sarah: Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic. Accordingly, another movie about bad teen lifestyle choices was made. In this one, Eve Plumb (who was 18 at the time) played Dawn Wetherby, a naive 15-year-old girl who leaves her single-parent, alcoholic, domineering mother for the bright lights of LA. Not long afterwards, she is forced to fend for herself as a street prostitute. The movie was successful enough to merit a sequel called Alexander: The Other Side of Dawn. Because Plumb was committed to her made-for-TV movies, she could not participate in the much-maligned Brady Bunch Variety Hour and avoided that catastrophe.
Tags: Eve  Plumb  teenage  runaway  hooker 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 4293
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dondi - Comic Strip 1955-1986 Dondi was a daily comic strip that ran for more than 30 years. It was about a large-eyed war orphan. Created by Gus Edson and Irwin Hasen, at its peak of popularity it ran in more than 100 newspapers. The first installment ran on September 25, 1955. The final Dondi comic strip appeared on June 8, 1986. Dondi's original backstory describes him as a five-year-old World War II orphan of Italian descent. The boy had no memory of his parents or his name, so when a pretty Red Cross worker said he was "a dandy boy," he thought she was naming him Dondi. Two American soldiers who spoke no Italian, Ted Wills and Whitey McGowan, found the child wandering through a war-torn village. The soldiers brought the child back to the United States and Ted eventually became his adoptive father.
Tags: Dondi  comic  strip  newspapers  serial 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 11702
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 1257
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1972
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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