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Bananadine Hoax 1967 Bananadine is a fictional psychoactive substance which is supposedly extracted from banana peels. A hoax recipe for its extraction from banana peels was originally published in the Berkeley Barb in March 1967. It became more widely known when William Powell, believing it to be true, reproduced the method in The Anarchist Cookbook in 1970. The original hoax was designed to raise questions about the ethics of making psychoactive drugs illegal and prosecuting those who took them: 'What if the common banana contained psychoactive properties, how would the government react?" One book of one-liner joke comics, published in 1971, contained a comic in which a teen is secretly handing bunches of bananas to a zoo gorilla at night, uttering the line, 'Just throw the skins back, man!' Researchers at New York University have found that banana peel contains no intoxicating chemicals, and that smoking it produces only a placebo effect. Over the years, there has been considerable speculation regarding the psychoactive properties of banana skins. Donovan's hit single Mellow Yellow was released a few months prior to the Berkeley Barb article, and in the popular culture of the era, the song was assumed to be about smoking banana peels. Shortly after the 'Berkeley Barb' and the song, bananadine was featured in the New York Times.
Tags: hoax  bananadine  narcotics  bananas 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 1931
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Posted By: Lava1964
You Bet Your Life - Bill Cosby Remake One of the most enduring game shows of all time was the original You Bet Your Life. It was hosted by Groucho Marx first on radio in 1947 and continued well into the television era until 1961. The quiz game was clearly secondary to the superbly ad-libbed interviews Marx had with the contestants. A new version of You Bet Your Life, hosted by Bill Cosby, aired from September 7, 1992 to June 4, 1993 in syndication. Cosby was joined on this show by a female announcer and sidekick, Robbi Chong; she was referred to as "Renfield." Organist Shirley Scott contributed the jazzy theme music. The program was taped in Philadelphia. Three couples competed, each couple playing the game individually. After the couple was introduced, they spent time chatting with Cosby. When the interview was done, the game began. Each couple was staked with $750 and were then asked three questions within a category presented at the start of the game. Before each question, the couple made a wager, which would be added to their winnings if they were correct or subtracted if they were incorrect. The secret word in this version, worth $500, was represented by a blackbird wearing a sweatshirt from Temple University, Cosby's alma mater. The couple with the most money played for an additional $10,000. Although Cosby was renowned for ad-libbing funny exchanges with audience members as part of his stand-up comedy routines, he was no Groucho Marx. (Who, besides Groucho, was?) Low ratings prompted the cancellation of the series after just one season.
Tags: remake  You  Bet  Your  Life  Bill  Cosby  syndicated 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 1595
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cliff Robertson passes today at age 88 Cliff Robertson, who starred as John F. Kennedy in a 1963 World War II drama and later won an Academy Award for his portrayal of a mentally disabled bakery janitor in the movie "Charly," died Saturday, one day after his 88th birthday. Robertson, who also played a real-life role as the whistle-blower in the check-forging scandal of then-Columbia Pictures President David Begelman that rocked Hollywood in the late 1970s, died at Stony Brook University Medical Center on Long Island, according to Evelyn Christel, his longtime personal secretary. His family said he died of natural causes.
Tags: Cliff  Robertson  passes  today  at  age  88          1960s          Warner          Bros          Cliff          Robertson          Jack          John          Kennedy          JFK          David          Buttolph          William          Lava          president          war          warfare          WW2          crew          boat          pacific          attack 
Added: 10th September 2011
Views: 1400
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Posted By: Old Fart
Bob Atcher and Churn Fresh Meadow Gold Remember Bob Atcher? Bob Atcher was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, and learned violin and guitar from his father, who was skillful at playing the fiddle. Bob attended Kentucky State University when he was only 14. He studied medicine and combined that with guitar playing and yodeling. He started out on radio in Louisville on WHAS. In 1939 he was offered a regular gig on Chicago station WBBM which was broadcast nationally by CBS. The show made him a national star, and he signed with ARC just before CBS bought the company. After the purchase Atcher was transferred to Okeh Records and then to Columbia Records, both CBS subsidiaries. Between 1939 and 1942, he recorded many duets with Loretta Applegate, who went by the stage name Bonnie Blue Eyes. Atcher fought in the Army in World War II and returned to performing in 1946. In 1948 Atcher signed on with WLS and became a performer on their National Barn Dance. As one of their biggest stars, he continued to chart national hits. In 1950, he signed with Capitol Records, and later in the 1950s moved to Kapp Records. He continued with the Barn Dance well into the 1960s, and re-signed to Columbia that decade, re-recording many of his songs in stereo. Atcher, like Gene Autry, was a shrewd businessman, and bought several businesses and invested in banking with the proceeds from his career. He was also the mayor of Schaumburg, Illinois from 1959 to 1979. He died in 1993.
Tags: Atcher  Schaumburg 
Added: 18th January 2012
Views: 2178
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Posted By: KrazyKasper
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 – February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 7195
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Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3766
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Posted By: Lava1964
RollerGames - 1989 When pro wrestling experienced a resurgence in the 1980s could roller derby be very far behind? In 1989, RollerGames debuted in syndication in 96 percent of American TV markets. This clip is a preview of a match. It usually aired in the wee hours of the morning or on Saturday afternoons. It was roller derby with a twist. The track was a figure eight that featured a "wall of death". A live alligator pit in the track's "infield" was featured in the opening show. (Honest!) Teams in the six-team league included Hot Flash, Maniacs, and Bad Attitude. Despite halfway decent TV ratings--especially among the high school and university demographic--the show lasted just one season because its producer went bankrupt.
Tags: RollerGames  roller  derby  TV 
Added: 3rd April 2013
Views: 1616
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Olympic Rugby Final You may have to watch this clip through the appropriate link. Nevertheless, here are a few minutes of the gold-medal rugby match from the 1924 Paris Olympics. It was the fourth time rugby had been part of the Summer Olympics. In 1924 only three countries entered teams: the United States, Romania, and France. In the round-robin event, France crushed Romania 61-3. The Americans blasted the Romanians 37-0 to set up a championship encounter against the French. The host French showed great animosity against the American team (that was mostly made up of students from Stanford University). The French refused to allow the Americans to have anything resembling a practice field, so they ended up working out in a local park. The Americans were kicked out of their hotel and also lost about $4,000 in valuables when their supposedly secure locker room was broken into by thieves. Undeterred, the Americans, despite being 5:1 underdogs in wagering, thumped the French 17-3 to take the gold medals. They needed a police escort to leave the stadium safely. One American substitute was knocked cold when he was struck over the head with a spectator's walking stick! Rugby has not been in any Olympics since that time, but it will return to the Games in 2016.
Tags: Olympics  rugby  1924  Paris  USA  France 
Added: 17th March 2013
Views: 1391
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Jones passes at age 81 Country superstar George Jones, known for "He Stopped Loving Her Today" and a long string of other hits, has died. He was 81. According to Webster & Associates, the Nashville public relations firm that represented Jones, he died Friday at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He was hospitalized there on April 18 for treatment of a fever and irregular blood pressure, the p.r. firm adds.
Tags: George  Jones  He  Stopped  Loving  Her  Today    fever  and  irregular  blood  pressure  country  wester  music  honky  tonk 
Added: 26th April 2013
Views: 986
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Posted By: Cliffy
Morrie Schwartz Nightline Interview If you've read Tuesdays With Morrie, you'll know what this is. If you haven't, you ought to! Here's a brief explanation: Morrie Schwartz was a beloved sociology professor at Brandeis University. When he was diagnosed with ALS in the early 1990s, his remarkable way of openly and candidly dealing with his impending death inspired a local newspaper article--which then prompted an interview with Ted Koppel on Nightline. By chance, one of Morrie's former students, sportswriter Mitch Albom, happened to see the broadcast. Albom was inspired to reconnect with his favorite professor every Tuesday until his death where Morrie "taught" one last course to Mitch about life, death, philosophy, and other topics. Albom took these sessions and turned them into Tuesdays With Morrie, one of the finest books of the 20th century. This clip is a segment from Morrie's original Nightline interview.
Tags: Morrie  Schwartz  Tuesdays  With  morrie  Ted  Koppel  Nightline 
Added: 3rd May 2013
Views: 2335
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Posted By: Lava1964

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