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For Old Fart  Michael Richards on Fridays A younger Michael Richards as 'Combat Kid' on ABC's 'Fridays'. This was what SNL used to be, high energy, edgy and hip. SNL had become tedious and chances are that if you thought the same about Friday's you were just too young to understand the comedic references. SNL had become a media institution at that point, like Rolling Stone, which used to be considered part of The Underground Press, and if you had a media product to peddle it was simply a base that had to be touched by the star or written into the sketches. Friday's didn't care about any of that. From the announcer's screaming greeting 'Liiiiiiiiiive, from the Los Angeles basin!' to music by that day's hippest bands, Friday's showcased some of the most outrageous comedy to be found on TV. Most people remember Darrow Igus's Rasta Gourmet 'Do we bake it?' 'No no no no!' 'Do we fry it?' 'No no no no!' 'til finally 'We SMOKE it!' 'ya ya ya ya', exclaimed Igus' gourmet, whose only spice was Ganja. Michael Richard's Battle Boy got sicker and sicker as he developed the character, finally taking his little Sister hostage, burying her in the ground and threatening to torture her Barbie. Then there were the times he set his Army men on fire, complete with simulated screams. Very bizarre, but funny!
Tags: fridays  michael  richards  abc  late  night  comedy 
Added: 10th January 2008
Views: 4018
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Posted By: Naomi
The Weather Underground- Warning Strong Language In 1969, a small group of college students announced their intentions to overthrow the U.S. government in opposition to the Vietnam War. This documentary explores the rise and fall of this radical movement as former members speak candidly about the passion that drove them at the time. The film also explores the group in the context of other social movements of the time, featuring interviews with former members of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and the Black Panther Party. The documentary also examines the U.S. government's suppression of dissent during this turbulent era. Using archival footage from the 1960s and 1970s, the film also intersperses recent interviews with high profile ex-Weathermen like Bernardine Dohrn, David Gilbert, Bill Ayers, Mark Rudd and Brian Flanagan, who talk about their involvement in the organization, their experiences, and the trajectory that led them to be placed on the FBI's Most Wanted list.
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Added: 8th October 2008
Views: 1627
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Posted By: Cathy
French Girlfriends of German Soldiers When France was liberated in 1944, members of the French partisans and underground exacted their revenge on local women who'd had German soldiers as lovers. The women would publicly have their heads shaved as a mark of shame and betrayal.
Tags: French  girlfriends  partisans  Second  World  War 
Added: 19th November 2008
Views: 2428
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Blitz Photo - 1940 Think we had it tough in North America during the Second World War? We could sleep in our beds at night reasonably certain we weren't going to be blown to smithereens. No so our British allies. This remarkable color photo from October 14, 1940 shows the effects of a typical nighttime air raid targetting London. (The Brits referred to it as "the Blitz.") A large German bomb blew a hole in a street near a bus stop, penetrated through to the Belham underground (subway) station below ground, and killed 68 people who thought they were out of harm's way. Later that same night, a bus travelling in blackout conditions--and thus unaware of the enormous hole in the street--drove into the gaping crater.
Tags: blitz  London  Second  World  War 
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 4277
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1094
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lawn Jockeys Signified An Underground Railroad Home A lot of people don't know the real meaning behind these statues, so they vandalize them, bitch about them being racist, etc. When the image of a black 'footman' with a lantern signified the home was a stop on the Underground Railroad. These are largely a northern thing, and weren't commonly found in the South until after WWII when northerners moved there and brought this custom with them. The clothing of the statue was also coded. A striped jockey's shirt meant that this was a place to swap horses, while a footman in a tailed coat meant overnight lodgings/food, and a blue sailor's waistcoat meant the homeowner could take you to a port and get you on a ship to Canada. I always laugh when I hear black folks talk about how racist these are, because honestly, the cats who had them were likely the LEAST racist. Later, these came back into popularity after WWII, and they were again coded to show the white homeowners supported early civil rights efforts, weren't Klan, etc.
Tags: Lawn  Jockeys  Signified  An  Underground  Railroad  Home  black  African  American  slavery    Civil  Rights  KKK  Klan  civil  rights 
Added: 28th January 2016
Views: 2671
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Posted By: Cathy

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