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Balloon Land 1935 Ub Iwerks the man behind Mickey Mouse. Left Disney and started his own company in the early 30's. His cartoons show a style and sense of humor and technical innovation that set him apart as one of the founding fathers of animation.
Tags: cartoons  ub  iwerks 
Added: 7th February 2009
Views: 1846
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Posted By: brotherbox
Timex Sinclair 1000 Computer Back in 1982 the Timex Corp. and Sinclair research (of Britain,) teamed up and produced the Timex Sinclair 1000. It was a low-priced introduction to home computers. It sported 2K of onboard RAM, (yes, 2K! 2 kilobytes of memory!) You could also purchase a 16K add-on memory module called a RAM Pack, (lower right in the picture,) which increased the memory to 18K. I believe there was also a 64K RAM Pack available later. The ones sold in Britain were known as the ZX 81. It had no display but you could hook it up to the VHF antenna connections on the back of your television set. It also didn't have any sound. The operating system was a modified version of the BASIC computer language and it gave a lot of people, including me, their first taste of computer programming. There were a number of programs that you could buy for it. They were all on cassette tapes. What you would do is connect the unit to your TV set, plug your cassette tape player into it and put whatever program you might have into the tape player. You had to turn the volume off on your cassette player because the programming code was just one continual screeching sound. I had a cassette tape that had a few different programs on it. All of the characters in the programs were block-headed type graphics, but they actually would walk across the screen and even jump up and down. Cool stuff back then. I remember this costing me $29, as the store I bought it at was getting rid of them. I believe the original selling price was $99. I also bought the 16K RAM Pack for $25. I've kept it all these years in good condition thinking that someday it would be worth something, and I was right. They're selling for about 10 bucks on eBay! Win a few, lose a few. Ironically, these things have somewhat of a cult following, and I've even heard of clubs dedicated to the TS-1000!
Tags: timex  sinclair  ts1000  computer 
Added: 4th September 2007
Views: 2447
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Co-Ed Fever - Forgotten Sitcom There have been a handful of sitcoms that lasted just one episode. This is one of them: the college-based Co-Ed Fever. This CBS show aired just once, on Sunday, February 4, 1979. It followed CBS' screening of the movie Rocky which drew very good ratings. When the overnight ratings for Co-Ed Fever were disappointing, CBS panicked and cancelled its commitment for at least five other episodes which were to have a Monday evening time slot. The show was set in Brewster House at Baxter College, an eastern women's school that had just recently allowed male students to enroll. Total Television calls Co-Ed Fever a "hapless sitcom." Cast member Heather Thomas, who would later have a substantial roll on The Fall Guy, once joked that Co-Ed Fever "was cancelled after the third commercial." Jane Rose, who played Mrs. Selby (the matron at Brewster House), died a few months after Co-Ed Fever was axed. Alexa Kenin (who played Mousie and later had film roles in Little Darlings and Pretty in Pink), died at age 23 in 1985. Her cause of death has never been made public. Here is the show's opening montage.
Tags: Co-Ed  Fever  CBS  sitcom 
Added: 6th February 2014
Views: 1746
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Posted By: Lava1964
Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2705
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Posted By: Teresa
Pavoratti Dead at 71  Last Public Performance Another legend passes today. Although I'm not a fan of opera, I had a great respect for this man and his art!
Tags: Pavoratti  Dead  at  71    Last  Public  Performance 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 1524
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Posted By: Old Fart
NBC News update Easter 1979 Tags: TV    news    television    update    break    brief    1970s    1979    Jessica    Savitch    network    Easter    Sunday    Pope    Vatican    earthquake    Yugoslavia    Dubrovnik    flood    Jackson    Mississippi    Erik    Estrada    game    show     
Added: 16th April 2009
Views: 2382
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Posted By: Cliffy
Bubble Fashion Simone D'Aillencourt . . 1963
Tags: Simone  D'Aillencourt        fashion      bubble 
Added: 4th February 2009
Views: 1143
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Posted By: Teresa
       THE GIANT BEHEMOTH Teresa,you should love this gem. Of course, the A bomb was to blame, was there any doubt?
Tags: the  giant  behemoth  science  fiction 
Added: 8th September 2007
Views: 1515
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Posted By: Sophia
Shirley Eaton  Shes Alive Undoubtedly Eaton's most famous role was that of Jill Masterson in the 1964 James Bond film GOLDFINGER. Her character's death, being painted head to toe in gold paint and suffering "skin suffocation", became an iconic image of the film and inadvertently led to the creation of a popular belief concerning both the method of death and the actress' own fate. Eaton, very much alive, later appeared in a 2003 episode of the TV documentary series MythBusters to help debunk the belief. . .
Tags: shirley  eaton  jill  masterson  Goldfinger  james  bond 
Added: 10th September 2007
Views: 2085
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Posted By: Teresa
1957 Frances Farmer Update when i posted the photo of a glamorous and radiant Frances Farmer, i became interested in her life and career. As Sophia stated, reports of her 'institutional life' are conflicting (i.e. whether or not she had indeed had a lobotomy). What was evident, however, was that she was repeatedly subjected to insulin shock therapy and “hydrotherapy.” Now illegal, this barbaric practice consisted of her being stripped naked and thrown into a tub of icy water for six to eight hours at a time. . .i didn't intend to blog on this, but was so horrified at the treatment of the mentally ill.. that i couldn't stand it!
Tags: frances  farmer  sheraton 
Added: 13th September 2007
Views: 2128
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Posted By: Teresa

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