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Cincinnati Reds Comeback - 1972 NLCS The ballgame isn't over until the last man is out! That adage proved to be very true in the fifth and deciding game of the 1972 National League Championship Series. The Pittsburgh Pirates, the defending World Series champs from 1971, led the hometown Cincinnati Reds 3-2 going into the bottom of the ninth inning. Reliever Dave Giusti entered the game to shut down the Reds. As this brief clip shows, the Reds would not be denied. Johnny Bench tied the game with a leadoff home run. Tony Perez singled and was replaced by pinch-runner George Foster. Another single by Denis Menke advanced Foster to second base and drove Giusti from the mound. He was replaced by Bob Moose. Cesar Geronimo flied out to Roberto Clemente in right field, which advanced Foster to third base. Darrel Chaney popped out. Hal McRae, pinch-hitting for Reds' pitcher Clay Carroll, stepped into the batter's box. Moose uncorked a wild pitch. Foster scored and the Reds were on their way to the World Series. Nobody knew it at the time, but Roberto Clemente had played his last game. He died in a plane crash on New Year's Eve. Bob Moose met an untimely end too: He died in a car crash on his 29th birthday in 1976. By the way, do you recognize the radio announcer? It is Al Michaels.
Tags: MLB  1972  NLCS  Cincinnati  Pittsburgh 
Added: 11th July 2013
Views: 1613
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Frazier vs Zyglewicz  1969 On April 22, 1969, world heavyweight champion Joe Frazier put his title on the line in Houston against hometown favorite Dave (Ziggy) Zyglewicz. Ziggy, a huge underdog, gamely decided to take the fight to Frazier. Ninety-six seconds after the opening bell the contest was over. The vanquished Zyglewicz's wife later told reporters it was akin to "entering a Volkswagen in the Indianapolis 500."
Tags: boxing  Joe  Frazier  Dave  Zyglewicz 
Added: 14th December 2013
Views: 1580
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1814
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 2196
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Posted By: Lava1964
Andy Griffith- Car Phone A businessman's car breaks down two miles from Mayberry on a Sunday. He has a business appointment in Charlotte the next morning. He walks to town and finds it deserted until church lets out. The garage is also closed on Sunday. Gomer is working but can only pump gas and Wally refuses to repair the car until Monday. The stranger can't believe the pace of life in Mayberry and everyone's lack of urgency. Andy tries to talk him into spending the night and getting the car fixed on Monday.
Tags: Andy  Griffith-  Car  Phone  Mayberry  Radio  Cell  Phone  Man  in  a  Hurry  14  Jan.  1963 
Added: 14th November 2014
Views: 1524
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
CBS Radio Tags: CBS  Radio  news  team  anchoman  Uncle  Walter    And  thats  the  way  it  is  Douglas  Edwards  Dallas  Townsend  Mike  Wallace  Mars  life  discovered 
Added: 10th January 2015
Views: 788
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Posted By: Freckles
Town Changes Its Name to Joe Montana Joe Montana, who had quarterbacked the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl titles, was acquired by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1993. A happy Kansas City radio announcer dreamed up a unique publicity stunt to celebrate. He persuaded the small town of Ismay, MT to change its name for the duration of the 1993 NFL season to Joe, Montana. The 22 residents of Ismay voted unanimously in favor of the oddball idea. As a reward, they were all treated to a trip to see the a Chiefs play a home game versus the Cincinnati Bengals.
Tags: Joe  Montana  Ismay  publicity  stunt 
Added: 6th February 2015
Views: 777
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Alice Pearce - The First Gladys Kravitz The ABC sitcom Bewitched is certainly famous for having two different actors play Darrin Stephens. Many fans, however, forget there were two actresses who played Gladys Kravitz, the Stephens' nosy neighbor who often caught glimpses of Samantha's acts of witchcraft, but could not get her uninterested husband Abner to believe what she had seen. Alice Pearce played Gladys in the first two seasons starting in 1964. Known for her comical facial expressions, Pearce was well known to her Bewitched colleagues for being extremely funny and entertaining off camera. Pearce had achieved success on Broadway in Our Town and had a few appearances in movies and other TV shows before landing the role of Gladys Kravitz. Unbeknownst to any cast members, Pearce had a terrible secret: She had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer even before the first episode was shot. Only her husband new of her condition. Pearce continued to work on the series even after it was obvious that she was quite ill. In some of the second season's episodes, Pearce is dressed in a long coat or a heavy sweater to hide the emaciating effects of her disease. At the end of her life she weighed a mere 70 pounds. Pearce worked almost until the day she died (March 3, 1966 at the age of 48) and was replaced in the cast by Sandra Gould who was reluctant to assume the role because Pearce had played Gladys Kravitz so well. Pearce posthumously won an Emmy for best supporting actress in a comedy series. Her husband accepted it for her.
Tags: Alice  Pearce  first  Gladys  Kravitz  Bewitched  sitcom 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1121
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Posted By: Lava1964
Awful Lucille Ball Statue has Fans in Uproar In 2012 a bronze statue of beloved comedienne Lucille Ball was unveiled in her hometown of Celeron, NY. The reaction to 'Scary Lucy' (as the locals call it) has been overwhelmingly negative. Most Lucy fans think the statue bears little resemblance to the late, great TV icon. One person described it as "looking like a drunken zombie." There has been renewed interest in Scary Lucy because recently a Facebook page was created by upset fans who want the statue taken down. In a 2015 interview, artist Dave Poulin said he too was disappointed with the final product and hopes to get a chance to create a better replacement. The statue was funded by private donations.
Tags: statue  Lucille  Ball   
Added: 8th April 2015
Views: 903
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Posted By: Lava1964
1985 NBA Draft Lottery Conspiracy Many NBA fans steadfastly claim that the league's first draft lottery, held in 1985, was rigged. Prior to 1985, the two teams that finished in last place in the NBA's two conferences used a coin toss to determine which of the bottom-feeders would pick first overall in the collegiate draft that summer. This practice led to the accusation that some teams that had little hope of being competitive were deliberately tanking games to get in on the coin toss. To make tanking a less attractive proposition, the NBA instituted a 'draft lottery' in 1985 in which the seven teams that did not qualify for the playoffs had an equal chance of getting the first overall pick. In 1985 that selection would obviously be used to choose Patrick Ewing of Georgetown University who had led the Hoyas to three berths in the NCAA final in four years. Even before the draft was held there was scuttlebutt that the NBA would rig the draw so that the New York Knicks, the team with the biggest TV market, would get the #1 pick. The lottery was held at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. CBS televised the lottery between halves of a playoff game. As this clip shows, it was a very simplistic lottery. Seven sealed envelopes, each containing a team's logo, were put into a transparent sphere drum. The drum was spun. Commissioner David Stern selected the seven envelopes one at a time for the one to seven draft slots in that order. Almost immediately conspiracy theorists argued the draw had been rigged in favor of the Knicks. The fourth envelope tossed into the drum contained the Knicks' logo. It ended up with a bent corner because it was tossed into the drum more strongly than the other envelopes. Some cynics even claim the Knicks' envelope was frozen so Commissioner Stern would select the coldest envelope first! Others point out that the law firm responsible for overseeing the fairness of the lottery had a financial interest in the Knicks. Interestingly, the team that ended up with the seventh pick, Golden State, had the worst record in the NBA in 1984-85. In previous years they would have gotten no worse than the second pick. David Stern has always scoffed at the idea that the 1985 lottery was rigged. Watch for yourself and decide if anything was amiss.
Tags: 1985  NBA  draft  lottery  conspiracy 
Added: 21st May 2015
Views: 1027
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Posted By: Lava1964

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