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Isner-Mahut Wimbledon Marathon A first-round men's singles match at the 2010 Wimbledon tourney between American John Isner and Frenchman Nicolas Mahut was, in many respects, the greatest tennis match ever contested. It is the longest match in tennis history, measured both by time and number of games. The extraordinary match, contested over three days, lasted 11 hours and 5 minutes with Isner eventually prevailing 6–4, 3–6, 6–7(7–9), 7–6(7–3), 70–68 for a total of 183 games. The match began at 6:13 pm on Tuesday, June 22. At 9:07 pm, due to fading light, play was suspended at two sets all. After resuming on Wednesday, at 2:05 pm, the record for longest match was broken at 5:45 pm. The light faded again, and so play was suspended at 9:10 pm, with the final set tied at 59 games all. Play resumed at 3:43 pm on Thursday. Isner won at 4:48 pm, the final set having lasted 8 hours, 11 minutes. Both players broke numerous Wimbledon and tennis records, including each serving over 100 aces, with the match being referred to as "the endless match." Twice the score of the final set exceeded the scoreboard's ability to record it. (A computer technician was called in to address the problem both times.) Of course such a lengthy match is only possible at events such as Wimbledon where no tiebreaker is played in the final set.
Tags: tennis  Isner  Mahut  Wimbledon 
Added: 31st August 2013
Views: 878
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Posted By: Lava1964
How times have changed Tags: smartphones  cellphones  music  mp3  video  email   
Added: 22nd June 2013
Views: 1418
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Posted By: pfc
1924 Olympics - Team Gymnastics How times have changed! Check out how men's team gymnastics were presented at the 1924 Paris Olympics. That's the Danish team in action.
Tags: 1924  Olympics  Paris  gymnastics 
Added: 5th July 2013
Views: 933
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Posted By: Lava1964
Luz Long Helps Jesse Owens At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Jesse Owens won four gold medals. His toughest struggle was in the long jump. Owens was the overwhelming favorite to win the event, but he fouled on his first two attempts. A third foul would eliminate him. Germany's Luz Long, the European long jump champion, went out of his way to assist the discouraged Owens. Long (who had set a new Olympic record with one of his qualifying jumps) informed Owens that he could easily qualify for the finals by leaping several inches behind the foul line. Owens followed Long's advice--leaping with at least four inches to spare--and qualified for the long jump finals. In the finals, the Olympic record was broken five times. Owens had the longest leap and won the gold medal. Long was the first to congratulate him. Owens and Long became friends. Long was killed serving with the German army in Sicily in 1943. Long was posthumously awarded the Coubertin Medal for Sportsmanship by the IOC. After the war, Long's widow and son continued to regularly correspond with Owens until his death in 1973.
Tags: 1936  Olympics  Luz  Long  Jesse  Owens  long  jump 
Added: 12th July 2013
Views: 1220
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Posted By: Lava1964
Our handheld games Weren't times simpler back then?
Tags: handheld  games  of  yesteryear  old  days   
Added: 8th August 2013
Views: 737
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Posted By: pfc
Short Life of Patrick Kennedy For two days in August 1963, the attention and concern of many Americans was focused on the newborn son of president John F. Kennedy, Patrick. Patrick Bouvier Kennedy was born by emergency caesarean section five-and-a-half weeks early at the Otis Air Force Base Hospital in Bourne, Massachusetts. His birth weight of 4 pounds 10-1/2 ounces medically classified him as premature. Immediately after Patrick's birth, he was transferred to Boston Children's Hospital where he died two days later of hyaline membrane disease, following treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. His obituary in The New York Times stated that, at that time, all that could be done for a victim of hyaline membrane disease "is to monitor the infant's blood chemistry and to try to keep it near normal levels." Hyaline membrane disease, now more commonly called respiratory distress syndrome, helped spark new public awareness of the disease and further research. In 2004, the disease had an overall mortality of less than 15%—lower among mildly to moderately premature infants, such as with the Kennedys' infant son. Had he been born 50 years later in August 2013, his odds of survival would have been 95%. Treatment modalities are now widely available in developed countries, such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), pulmonary surfactant replacement, and improved respirator technology, that either did not exist or were unavailable in 1963.
Tags: Kennedy  baby  death   
Added: 1st September 2013
Views: 1108
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bowling for Dollars Bowling for Dollars was a program that began in Baltimore in the 1960s and rapidly spread across the North American local TV landscape. Sports Illustrated once ran a story about the phenomenon. The show's concept was simple: Local bowlers tried to win a growing jackpot by rolling two consecutive strikes. If the jackpot wasn't won, it was increased for the next bowler. (If they didn't win the jackpot, contestants usually got paid a dollar per pin they knocked down.) Five-pin bowling is popular in Canada. In the version of Bowling for Dollars that aired on CKCO-TV in Kitchener, Ontario, three strikes were needed to win the jackpot--which was split with a lucky "pin pal" whose name was drawn from a Plexiglass drum of postcards sent in by viewers. The jackpot once reached a lofty $9,000. As many as nine different bowlers sometimes appeared on a 30-minute episode. Despite being low-budget and corny, Bowling for Dollars ran for a remarkable 24 years on CKCO-TV from 1971 to 1995. For most of its run, the show aired weeknights at 6:30 p.m.--right after the six o'clock news ended. This clip is likely from the early 1980s. Bill Inkol (who had the longest tenure as host) is the man holding the microphone.
Tags: Bowling  for  Dollars  Kitchener  CKCO-TV 
Added: 30th November 2013
Views: 1654
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Grant Memorial Resurfaces Eddie Grant was a Harvard-educated ballplayer who played for four MLB teams between 1906 and 1915. After his baseball career ended, Grant enlisted in the army during the First World War at age 34. He rose to the rank of captain. On October 5, 1918, a few weeks before the war ended, Grant was killed by enemy shell fire in the Argonne Forest. On Memorial Day 1921, the New York Giants, Grant's final MLB team, unveiled an enormous brass plaque that was handsomely mounted on a five-foot granite marker that sat in the deepest part of the Polo Grounds underneath the home team's clubhouse. From the memorial's dedication until the Giants abandoned New York and the Polo Grounds in 1957, a solemn wreath-laying ceremony was held at the Grant monument every year, usually between games of a Memorial Day doubleheader. At the conclusion of the final game played at the Polo Grounds on September 29, 1957, souvenir hunters mobbed the field. The New York Times reported that three teenagers were seen prying the bronze plaque off the monument. Rumors that the police ultimately recovered the plaque were never verified, and its whereabouts remained a mystery for nearly 42 years. In late July 1999, the Eddie Grant Memorial plaque was discovered in the attic of a home in Ho-Ho-Kus Township, NJ. It had been formerly owned by Lena and Gaetano Bucca. The new home owners, Brian and Deborah Lamb, came across the plaque carefully wrapped in a blanket and hidden under a trap door in the attic. Brian Lamb contacted Baseball Reliquary Board member, Wendy Brougalman, a former business associate, with news of the discovery. How did the 100-pound plaque end up in a New Jersey attic? The Lambs purchased the home from the Bucca family after the death of Lena Bucca in 1998. Gaetano Bucca, a former New York City police officer, died in 1974. Gaetano, who retired from the force in January 1958 and subsequently moved with his family to New Jersey, served in the city's 32nd precinct, an area of jurisdiction encompassing the Polo Grounds. It is assumed that that Officer Bucca and a few allies had arranged to take the plaque with the intention of delivering it to the Eddie Grant American Legion Post 1225 in the Bronx. The plaque never made it there. Benjamin Bucca, Gaetano's only surviving son and a respected probate attorney, had no knowledge at all of the 100-pound plaque situated just above his head in his former bedroom. "You know, I never felt comfortable in that bedroom," he said. "Now I know why! That thing could have fallen on my head in the middle of the night and flattened me. My Pop was always a bit of a mystery, but this . . . This is . . . What the hell was he thinking about?'"
Tags: Baseball  Eddie  Grant  Memorial  recovered 
Added: 8th October 2014
Views: 2228
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stump the Schwab Here's a clip from a game show that sports fans ought to recall: Stump the Schwab. ESPN featured their in-house stats guru, Howie Schwab, in a sports quiz face-off against an array of challengers. In the 80 total shows made from 2004 to 2006, "The Schwab" as Howie liked to call himself, won 64 times--an impressive 80 percent success rate. Stuart Scott, who served as the show's quizmaster, died on January 4, 2015 from cancer at the young age of 49. ESPN callously fired Schwab from his behind-the-scenes position at the network in 2013 after 26 years of service as part of its broad cost-cutting measures.
Tags: Stump  the  Schwab  ESPN  game  show  sports  quiz 
Added: 5th January 2015
Views: 890
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Ginny Wroblicki One Day at a Time was a CBS sitcom that garnered decent ratings during its nine-year run from 1975 through 1984. The show's premise was that a new divorcee, Ann Romano (played by Bonnie Franklin), had relocated to Indianapolis with her two daughters to begin life anew. A brash character named Ginny Wroblicki joined the cast in the show's second season as the family's apartment-building neighbor. Wroblicki (played by Mary Louise Wilson) was described by Total Television as a "brassy cocktail waitress." In her first appearance on the show, Wroblicki initially quarrels with Ann without much provocation, but in the end Wroblicki helps Ann thwart a dishonest, fly-by-night upholstering business that was trying to overcharge her. In a couple of episodes Wroblicki was the romantic interest of Dwayne Schneider, the macho apartment superintendent (played by Pat Harrington). Wroblicki's character got mixed reviews. Some fans liked her in-your-face persona while others found it too overbearing and unappealing. (One critic said Wroblicki was "mannish." Another said she "looked like she had been around the block about 10 times.") She vanished after the 1976-77 season never to be heard from again. According to some scuttlebutt, Bonnie Franklin convinced CBS to dump the Ginny Wroblicki character from the show because she feared Wilson was upstaging her.
Tags: Ginny  Wroblicki  One  Day  at  a  Time  sitcom 
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 3738
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Posted By: Lava1964

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