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Memories of Danny Kaye Danny was born David Daniel Kaminsky in Brooklyn in 1913, the son of an immigrant Russian tailor. After dropping out of high school he worked for a radio station and later as a comedian in the Catskills. After his solo success in the Catskills, he joined the dancing act of Harvey and Young in 1933. On opening night he lost his balance and the audience broke into a roar of laughter. He would later incorporate this into his act. Enjoying growing popularity in 1939, Danny won over the Broadway crowd that same year with his show-stopping comic singing in "Lady in the Dark," in which he rattled off the names of more than fifty polysyllabic Russian composers in 39 seconds in a song called "Tchaikovsky." Throughout the early 1940's he performed night club acts, on Broadway, and to support the troops overseas during WWII. Though he appeared in his first film in 1937, it wasn’t until almost 10 years later that his film career hit its stride. Throughout his career he starred in seventeen movies, including THE KID FROM BROADWAY (1946), THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947), THE INSPECTOR GENERAL (1949), HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1952), and the incomparable THE COURT JESTER (1956). In one of his final performances, he proved the versatility of his talent and earned rave reviews for his impassioned portrayal of a Holocaust survivor in the 1981 television movie SKOKIE. In 1987 Danny died of a heart attack in Los Angeles. An amazing actor, singer, dancer, comic, and all-around entertainer, he was a Renaissance man off the stage as well as on, where he was a celebrated chef, a baseball team owner, and an airplane pilot, flying everything from Piper Cubs to Boeing 747’s. His deep and continued commitment to the betterment of the people of the world was an inspiration, and his intelligent humor created a style all his own that made him one of the most beloved entertainers of his time. In a clip from the 1952 film "Hans Christian Andersen", Danny shows off his incredible style with "Inchworm.
Tags: danny  kaye  actors  singers  comedians 
Added: 7th November 2007
Views: 2542
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Posted By: Sophia
Lee Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra SOME VELVET MORNING "Some Velvet Morning" is a psychedelic pop song written by Lee Hazlewood and originally recorded by Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra in late 1967. It first appeared on Sinatra's album Movin' with Nancy. The song has been covered many times since, almost always as a duet. Although "Some Velvet Morning" is one of the more famous duets Hazlewood and Sinatra recorded together, it is considered a departure from their usual fare, as it is decidedly less influenced by country & western music. The single peaked at number 26 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1968.
Tags: lee  hazlewood  nancy  sinatra  some  velvet  morning  60s  music 
Added: 8th November 2007
Views: 1715
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Posted By: Naomi
Remembering  Tracy  and  Hepburn Song "I Finally Found Someone" by Barbra Streisand and Bryan Adams. Nowadays, Hollywood fans have regarded Hepburn's lifelong romance with Spencer Tracy as an example of true love even though they never married. Although there must have been true love between them, their romance was far from being a Cinderella story. For most of the years that she spent with him, he was also an alcoholic, at times launching abusive rants before blacking out. For years at a time, Hepburn would help him dry out, arranging her professional life around his needs……..Near the end of Tracy's life Hepburn all but quit working to nurse him through repeated illnesses." Hepburn defended her affair saying, "We just passed 27 years together, in what was to me absolute bliss." And how did Tracy feel about their romance? Believe it or not, it seems he never talked about it because he refused to admit it actually existed. Even when Hepburn rushed to his side when he was hospitalized before he passed on, Tracy referred to her as a wonderful friend. Tracy never allowed the two of them to be photographed together except for a movie they both starred in. We are told that the reason for this is that Tracy was a devout Catholic and was married to another woman, had children and did not want to offend his children, or wife. The love relationship of Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy was an example of both heartbreak and true love.
Tags: katherine  hepburn  spencer  tracy  hollywood  actors   
Added: 8th November 2007
Views: 1899
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Posted By: Guido
Mashed Potatoes 1965 Wow, this makes me feel like a teen again! DeeDee Sharp started her career recording back-up vocals in 1961. In 1962 she began a string of very successful Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hits: "Slow Twistin'" with Chubby Checker, "Mashed Potato Time", "Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes)", "Ride!" and "Do the Bird". Here's DeeDee Sharp doing Mashed Potato Time.
Tags: deedee  sharp  mashed  potato  time  60s  dance  music 
Added: 9th November 2007
Views: 2471
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Posted By: Sophia
Bennett Cerf Interview Part 2 This is the second part of the interview given by longtime What's My Line panelist Bennett Cerf to journalist Robin Hawkins on January 23, 1968. It was part of an oral history project focusing on famous New Yorkers. (The sound occasionally fades in and out.) Again, Bennett provides some interesting anecdotes about his WML colleagues.
Tags: Bennet  Cerf  interview  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 14th March 2009
Views: 1729
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Posted By: Lava1964
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2946
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Posted By: Lava1964
Valerie Bertinelli My choice for the prettiest sitcom star ever--Valerie Bertinelli in her heyday as Barbara Cooper on One Day at a Time. Frankly, she was the only reason I watched the show.
Tags: Valerie  Bertinelli 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1985
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Posted By: Lava1964
Britney timeline. .
Tags: britney  spears 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1283
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Posted By: Teresa
Diffrent Strokes cast photo This is a cast photo from Diff'rent Strokes, a popular NBC sitcom that ran from 1978 through 1985. The show was about a Park Avenue millionaire widower who decides to adopt two black kids. (I'm sure that happens all the time!) The cst members were Todd Bridges as Willis, Conrad Bain as Mr. Drummond, Dana Plato as Kimberley, and Gary Coleman as Arnold. Today the show is cynically remembered for the legal and social troubles that befell its youthful stars. A Johnny Carson Carnac routine summed it up best: The answer is coffee, donuts, and a Diff'rent Strokes cast member. The question is name three things you find in the back seat of a police car!
Tags: Diffrent  Strokes  cast 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1836
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Posted By: Lava1964
Connie Mack 1927 Baseball scholars will recognize the man on the cover of Time Magazine as Connie Mack, baseball's grand patriarch and most enduring manager. Born Cornelius McGillicuddy, Mack, a former catcher, managed the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons (1894 thorugh 1896) and the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 seasons (1901 through 1950) for the astonishing total of 7,755 games managed! The fact that he owned the Athletics ensured he never got fired. His teams fluctuated from greatness to ineptitude largely because he was reluctant to pay big salaries to keep his star players. (His 1931 Athletics won 107 of 154 games. In contrast, Mack's 1916 Athletics won just 36 games.) Mack never wore a uniform on the bench, always a business suit. Much beloved by the baseball establishment, Mack was once quoted as saying he preferred his teams to start well but finish in fourth place. That way he would make a profit for the season but his players couldn't demand raises!
Tags: Connie  Mack  baseball 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2339
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Posted By: Lava1964

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