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Subeam Bread They still make it but I haven't seen it in the stores in a long time.
Tags: Little  Miss  Sunbeam  Subeam  Bread   
Added: 28th September 2015
Views: 786
Rating:
Posted By: Freckles
Revere Ware They still make it. Haven't seen it since I was a child.
Tags: Revere  Ware  pots  and  pans  copper  clad  stainless  cookware 
Added: 3rd October 2015
Views: 712
Rating:
Posted By: Cathy
Thats My Mama - Failed Sitcom ABC had high hopes for the sitcom That's My Mama when it debuted in the fall of 1974. This clip shows the bland opening credits from the first season. The sitcom was set in a middle-class black section of Washington, D.C. It featured Clifton Davis as Clifton Curtis, a youthful barber who was the proprietor of a shop he inherited from his late father. Theresa Merritt played his widowed mother, Eloise. Slotted on Wednesday nights directly against against NBC's Little House on the Prairie, the sitcom failed to crack the Nielsen top 30 at any time during its first season and was nearly axed. Still thinking it had potential, ABC kept it on for part of a second season. When ratings did not improve, That's My Mama was terminated after its 39th episode aired on December 17, 1975--although a rerun was shown the following week. The sitcom did, however, launch the career of Ted Lange, who played the roll of Clifton's flamboyant friend, Junior. Lange went on to bigger and better things as bartender Isaac Washington on The Love Boat.
Tags: Thats  My  Mama  Clifton  Davis  Theresa  Merritt  Ted  Lange  ABC  sitcom 
Added: 3rd November 2015
Views: 962
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1161
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
 Funeral for Confederate Submariners On February 17, 1864, the small navy of the Confederate States of America could claim a military first: A submarine sank an enemy ship. The crew of the H.L. Hunley, under the command of George Dixon, achieved the feat of sinking the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor, only to mysteriously sink later that same day with the loss of its entire crew of eight sailors. The H.L. Hunley had a short, checkered history. Twice it sank during training operations, killing a total of 13 men--including its namesake inventor who was aboard for the second catastrophe. Both times the hull was raised, repaired and put back into service. The hull of the Hunley was first located in 1995 and was raised in 2000. The remains of the brave sailors were finally laid to rest on April 17, 2004. Thousands of curious but respectful onlookers, dressed in both blue and gray, turned out for the ceremony at Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, SC. Scientists and military historians are still trying to discover exactly why the submarine sank.
Tags: Confederate  submariners  funeral 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1241
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Hans Schmidt - Murdering Priest Father Hans Schmidt, a handsome Catholic priest originally from Germany, is the only person from his profession ever to be executed in American history. Born in Bavaria in 1881, Schmidt immigrated to the United States in 1909. He was first assigned to a church in Louisville, KY, but a dispute with a fellow priest prompted his relocation to St. Boniface Church in New York City. He quickly gained a reputation of being a fiery orator whose sermons often warned about the temptations of the flesh. Anna Aumuller, an attractive Austrian housekeeper employed by the rectory, caught his eye. The feeling was mutual. Contrary his vows of celibacy, Schmidt became sexually involved with Anna. It was later discovered the two were secretly married in a service of dubious legal standing performed by Schmidt himself! Anna became pregnant shortly thereafter. Schmidt realized this development would be the end of his priesthood, so he slit Anna's throat on September 2, 1913, dismembered her body, and dumped the pieces into the Hudson River. Nevertheless, the victim was identified because parts of the body had been wrapped in monogrammed linen that Anna had specially ordered. Confronted with this evidence, Schmidt confessed to the murder but attempted an insanity defense. It resulted in one hung jury but he was convicted in a second trial. Schmidt went to his death at Sing Sing Prison's electric chair on February 18, 1916. Police later found that Schmidt had another criminal enterprise: a secret apartment well stocked with counterfeiting equipment. Worse still, it was discovered that a nine-year-old girl had been murdered at Schmidt's former church in Louisville and the body--which the killer had tried to dismember--was buried in the church's basement. The church's janitor had been convicted of the crime, however.
Tags: Hans  Schmidt  murderer  priest 
Added: 14th January 2016
Views: 1056
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Wall Street Bombing - 1920 One of the least remembered terrorist attacks in American history occurred just past noon on Thursday, September 16, 1920 in the hub of America's financial center--New York City's Wall Street. An unattended horse-drawn wagon loaded with a bomb containing dynamite and 500 pounds of small iron weights was parked in front of 23 Wall Street. The corner building was then the headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co., the nation's most powerful bank. At 12:01 p.m., the timer on the bomb reached zero and a terrific explosion rocked the street. The concussion from the blast was so severe that it derailed a trolley car two blocks away. Several hundred people were injured by flying shrapnel and broken glass falling from the surrounding buildings. There were 38 fatalities--most of whom were not major financial magnates, but average Wall Street employees: clerical staff and messengers on their lunch breaks. Anarchist literature was found nearby threatening violence unless unnamed political prisoners were released. No arrests were ever made in the case, but historians and crime buffs strongly believe the bombing was carried out by an anti-capitalist/anarchist named Mario Buda who fled to Italy shortly after the bombing and stayed there until his death in 1963. Buda apparently was motivated by the arrests of fellow anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti earlier that year for the April 15, 1920 robbery of a Massachusetts shoe factory's payroll in which a security guard was killed. The only two deadlier terrorists attacks on American soil in the 20th century were the Bath School bombing of 1927 and the massive explosion at the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Despite the passage of nearly a century, deep shrapnel marks from the 1920 explosion are still visible on the limestone facade of 23 Wall Street.
Tags: Wall  Street  Bombing  terrorism 
Added: 15th February 2016
Views: 1397
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1909 World Series Scorecard Before electric scoreboards came along, fans who wanted to follow a baseball game closely kept personal scorecards. (Some still do, God bless them!) This skill, of course, required an attention span which is something of a dying trait these days. This scorecard is from the 1909 World Series between the Detroit Tigers and Pittsburgh Pirates. Notice how Pittsburgh is spelled without the "h." This is not a misprint. At the time the U.S. Post Office wanted to standardize the spellings all American cities that ended with "burgh" to make them "burg." Everyone complied for a while, but after a couple of decades many cities slowly reverted back to the spelling as it appeared on their charters. Oh, yeah: Pittsburgh won the 1909 World Series in seven games.
Tags: baseball  scorecard  1909  World  Series 
Added: 14th June 2016
Views: 1087
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bannister-Landy Miracle Mile 1954 One of the most famous track-and-field events of all time occurred on August 7, 1954. In May 1954 England's 25-year-old Roger Bannister became the first runner to record a sub-four-minute mile when he ran a 3:59.4 race at Oxford. About six weeks later, Australia's John Landy, age 24, claimed the world record by running the mile in an unheard of 3:58 flat in Finland. The two men would meet head-to-head in the British Empire Games in Vancouver in August 1954 in a race as eagerly anticipated as any in history. Landy had a reputation for establishing an insurmountable early lead in races and coasting to wins. Bannister, however, was known for possessing a strong finishing kick. This rare clip is from the CBC archives in Canada; it shows the entire race. Two things to watch: Look at how the front-running Landy constantly looks behind him to see where Bannister is. Also notice that every activity on the infield came to a standstill as all eyes were glued to the "Miracle Mile" race unfolding on the track.
Tags: Miracle  Mile  Roger  Bannister  John  Landy  Vancouver  British  Empire  Games 
Added: 12th October 2016
Views: 1478
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Hal Roach Interviewed at Age 100 Here's something fun: In January 1992, seven days after his 100th birthday, famous film producer Hal Roach was interviewed on The Tonight Show by Jay Leno. Roach began making a name for himself with silent comedies in the 1920s. Among other achievements, Roach was responsible for creating the Our Gang series of short comedies and for brilliantly pairing Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy together. Roach's mind was still very sharp for a centenarian and his stories were amusing. He died ten months later.
Tags: Hal  Roach  centenarian  movie  producer  Jay  Leno  Tonight  Show 
Added: 9th December 2016
Views: 1381
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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