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Edward R Murrow Stamp Controversy This commemorative postage stamp honoring the late great journalist Edward R. Murrow was somewhat controversial when it was released to the public in 1994. Why? It was based on a photograph of Murrow in which he was holding a cigarette. The cigarette was conveniently omitted from the image when the stamp was created, irking a few people who knew the chain-smoking Murrow was seldom seen without a cigarette in his hand. (Murrow routinely smoked 65 cigarettes a day, claimed he couldn't go without one for more than 30 minutes, had surgery in 1963 to remove a blackened lung, and died in 1965 of lung cancer.)
Tags: censored  postage  stamp  Edward  Murrow 
Added: 16th July 2014
Views: 143
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bradford City Grandstand Fire - 1985 Here is video of a terrible sports calamity: On May 11, 1985, English soccer club Bradford City were celebrating their promotion from the third division to the second division, having mathematically clinched the championship with a week to spare. The final game of the 1984-85 season at Valley Parade Stadium was against Lincoln City. More than 11,000 spectators were on hand--about twice the home average that season--to witness the festive pregame ceremonies featuring the championship trophy presentation. Yorkshire Television, with John Helm providing the commentary, was present to record the match for a tape-delayed broadcast the following day. Everyone was in a jovial mood until about 40 minutes after the match began. A fire broke out underneath Section G of the wooden grandstand--an antiquated structure that had not been modified since 1911 and was slated for demolition at the end of the season. The blaze likely started from a discarded match or cigarette that fell through the grandstand's floor boards. Beneath the grandstand was an enormous amount of flammable material; the team used the area for storage of old programs, among other things. Because of windy conditions, within four minutes a huge fire had engulfed the grandstand. There were no extinguishers nearby and no easy way to exit the grandstand in the event of an emergency. Initially it appeared that everyone was able to escape the danger by jumping onto the pitch, but 56 people died and 265 others were injured. Most of the fatalities were fans under 20 years old or over 70. One victim was Sam Firth, the club's 86-year-old former chairman. Many fans perished near locked gates or in the washrooms under the stands. Wooden grandstands were outlawed at stadiums in the UK following the tragedy. There were many heroic actions during the fire. Some 50 fans later received commendations for their rescue efforts.
Tags: soccer  Bradford  City  Fire 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 388
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirleys World - Failed TV Show Steve asked me to re-post this clip after it was lost when the website's server was changed. "Another example of an unsuccessful TV series featuring a major film star" is how Total Television described Shirley's World, a 30-minute dramedy that ran on ABC from September 15, 1971 to January 5, 1972. Shirley MacLaine played Shirley Logan, a globe-trotting photo-journalist employed by World Illustrated magazine. John Gregson played her editor. The show was extremely expensive to produce because it was actually filmed in exotic locales. Some critics have commented that the travel budget could have been more wisely spent on better scripts. It was produced in England by ITV and carried on ABC in the United States. Further complicating matters was MacLaine's dislike for producer Sheldon Leonard. Here's the opening montage.
Tags: Shirleys  World  ABC  dramedy 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 256
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 178
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Posted By: Lava1964
Private Snafu - WWII Mail Censorship During the Second World War the American War Department produced 26 animated movies featuring a goofy character named Private Snafu. Racy for their era, they were not released to the general public; they were only shown to military personnel. Each film was designed to illustrate something important about military life. This one from 1944, titled Censored, shows the pitfalls of trying to elude the US Army's mail censor. You'll recognize the voice of Private Snafu: It's Mel Blanc. Snafu sounds exactly like Bugs Bunny!
Tags: Private  Snafu  military  film  mail  censorship  WWII 
Added: 21st July 2014
Views: 558
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Posted By: Lava1964
Badfinger--Come and Get It Paul McCartney presented this song to Apple Recording Band Badfinger to play for the movie The Magic Christian since he was contracted to provide 3 songs for the movie. Badfinger had to play it exactly how he presented it which they did. See previous upload Come and Get It Paul McCartney.
Tags: Badfinger--Come  and  Get  It  Paul  McCartney  The  Beatles    The  Magic  Christian  Apple  Records 
Added: 2nd August 2014
Views: 412
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Posted By: Old Fart
Longest Running Lightbulb The world's longest lasting light bulb is the Centennial Light located at 4550 East Avenue, Livermore, California at the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department.
Tags: Longest  Running  Lightbulb  Livermore-Pleasanton  Fire  Department  Livermore,  California 
Added: 10th August 2014
Views: 267
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Posted By: Cathy

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