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Ara Parseghian Passes at age 94 Here's a very good tribute to one of college football's great coaches, Ara Parseghian, who died on August 2, 2017 at the age of 94. Parseghian was the head coach of the football programs at Miami of Ohio, Northwestern, and most famously, the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. In fact, Notre Dame, whose team was in the doldrums from 1956 to 1963, hired Parseghian, a non-Catholic of Armenian descent, in 1964 largely because his Northwestern team had beaten Notre Dame four times in a row. Parseghian coached Notre Dame from 1964 to 1974 and compiled a terrific record of 95-17-4. During Parseghian's tenure, Notre Dame was twice voted national champions in the post-season polls.
Tags: Ara  Parseghian  NCAA  football  Notre  Dame 
Added: 8th August 2017
Views: 741
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Posted By: Lava1964
1987 Little League World Series Blowout Entering the final of the 1987 Little League World Series, the American champions from Irvine, CA had won 18 games in a row. Two of the wins were in the quarterfinals and semifinals of the single-elimination tourney by scores of 13-0 over Dover, NH and 8-1 versus Chesterfield, IN. Their opponents in the final would be the team from Hualien, Taiwan--a country that had dominated the tournament for years, crushing all opposition. Jim Palmer, doing commentary for ABC, opined that the Irvine team might have what it takes to beat the seemingly invincible Taiwanese team. It didn't work out that way. Irvine lost 21-1 in the most lopsided LLWS championship game ever. The game was so one-sided and was taking so long to complete that ABC terminated the broadcast so its affiliates could go to their scheduled local news programming. The relentless rout also persuaded the LLWS poobahs to adopt a mercy rule to prevent similar beatdowns in the future. Therefore Taiwan's record 20-run margin of victory is likely to stand forever.
Tags: 1987  LLWS  baseball  Irvine  Taiwan 
Added: 9th September 2017
Views: 807
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Posted By: Lava1964
Maureen Connolly - Tragic Tennis Star You can watch tennis for the next hundred years and you'll never witness anyone match the dominance that Maureen (Little Mo) Connolly had at the majors between 1951 and 1954. She entered nine Grand Slam singles events--and won every one. Connolly first took up tennis at the age of 10 at San Diego's public courts. Although she was naturally left-handed, her first coach, Wilbur Folsom, converted Connolly to a right-hander. She became an excellent baseline player who, despite her small 5'5" frame, could strike powerful shots with either her backhand or her forehand. By the time Connolly was 14, she was the junior (under 18) female champion of the United States. She began competing in adult events shortly thereafter. Connolly won Forest Hills (the amateur-era forerunner of the US Open) just before her 17th birthday in 1951. In 1952 Connolly won both Wimbledon and Forest Hills. She didn't enter the French or Australian championships. In 1953, however, Connolly entered all four major championships and took them all, becoming the first female to achieve the calendar Grand Slam--a feat that's only been equaled twice in all the years since. In capturing the Grand Slam, Connolly lost just a single set in the four tourneys (to Susan Chatrier in a quarterfinal match in Paris). Entering the 1953 Wimbledon final, Connolly had only dropped eight games in five matches! At the Australian Championships, Connolly only lost 10 games in six matches before the final! Connolly began 1954 just as strongly. She successfully defended both her French and Wimbledon titles. Sadly, about two weeks after her third successive Wimbledon triumph, Connolly was badly injured in a horseback riding mishap when her horse was spooked by a passing cement truck. Her right leg was so badly fractured that it was nearly amputated. She was not quite 20 years old but her tennis career was over. In her nine Grand Slam singles finals, Connolly dropped just one set--and that was in her first one. Shortly after announcing her retirement from competitive tennis in 1955, Connolly married Norman Brinker, who had been a member of the American equestrian team at the 1952 Olympics. They had two daughters. Connolly was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1966. She battled the disease for three years before succumbing to it on June 21, 1969. She was just 34 years old.
Tags: tennis  Maureen  Connolly  grand  slam  champion 
Added: 17th September 2017
Views: 981
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Posted By: Lava1964
Forgotten Term - College Widow Here's a term that has virtually vanished from the English language: "college widow." Originally it had a very literal meaning. It referred to a youthful widow who sought the company of college men to satisfy her lusty ways. Eventually the term morphed into meaning any older female who 'preyed upon' the willing males at a campus with her irresistible feminine wiles. The term was so common in the 1920s and 1930s that it was the title of both a play and a movie. In the play, a college dean convinces his comely daughter to use her charms to distract a rival school's football team. (What a wonderful example of fatherhood!) Most people today are only familiar with the term from seeing the Marx brothers' 1932 movie Horse Feathers. Few people today realize Horse Feathers is actually a parody of the 1927 silent movie The College Widow. In it Thelma Todd uses her obvious charms to seduce all four Marx brothers as part of a silly plot to steal Huxley College's football plays.
Tags: college  widow  English  term 
Added: 28th October 2017
Views: 907
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Posted By: Lava1964
Incomplete 1919 Stanley Cup Final The NHL has not always had sole possession of the Stanley Cup as its championship trophy. It was originally donated by Lord Stanley of Preston, Canada's fifth governor-general, to be awarded to the championship amateur hockey team of Canada. By 1910, the rules were liberalized and professional teams were competing for it. Beginning in the 1910s, the professional champions of the west annually met the champions of the eastern-based National Hockey Association (and later the National Hockey League) for the Cup with the venue alternating between east and west each year. In 1919, the Seattle Metropolitan were pitted against the Montreal Canadiens in a best-of-five contest in Seattle. After five games, the series was tied with each team having won twice and one game ending in a tie. A sixth game was necessary to decide the Cup winner, but by the end of the fifth game, both teams were feeling the effects of illness as the Spanish Influenza pandemic hit Seattle. The Canadiens were especially hard hit by the flu bug. Several players were hospitalized. One, defenseman Joe Hall, died. The series was abandoned and never resumed. Thus there was no Stanley Cup winner in 1919.
Tags: hockey  Stanley  Cup  final  cancelled  1919  flu  epidemic 
Added: 11th November 2017
Views: 702
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stanford Indians From 1930 to 1972 Stanford University's varsity sports teams were known as the Indians. (At the 1971 Rose Bowl game, the cheerleaders were dressed in native costumes for the band's halftime show.) However, pressure by native American groups, who claimed the nickname was demeaning and insensitive to their heritage, caused the University to change it to Cardinals in 1975. (The new name had nothing to do with the bird, but rather the cardinal red color of the uniforms.) The move was quite controversial. For the first few years there was annual pressure to reinstate the Indians name and logo. However, in 1975 Stanford's board of governors declared the disavowal of the Indians nickname to be irrevocable. The singular Cardinal nickname was officially adopted in 1990. Still there are some old fans and alumni who pine for the return of the Indian logo and name.
Tags: Stanford  Indians  nickname 
Added: 2nd December 2017
Views: 708
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Posted By: Lava1964
Peggy Fleming - 1968 US Olympic Trials Nineteen-year-old Peggy Fleming officially earns her spot on the 1968 Olympic figure skating team with her free skate at the US championships at the Spectrum in Philadelphia. (The event doubled as the national Olympic trials.) Note the balletic quality of her performance. A short time later Fleming would win the Olympic gold medal in Grenoble and the world championship a few weeks after that in Geneva.
Tags: figure  skating  Peggy  Fleming 
Added: 18th September 2018
Views: 609
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Posted By: Lava1964

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