Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Timex Sinclair 1000 Computer Back in 1982 the Timex Corp. and Sinclair research (of Britain,) teamed up and produced the Timex Sinclair 1000. It was a low-priced introduction to home computers. It sported 2K of onboard RAM, (yes, 2K! 2 kilobytes of memory!) You could also purchase a 16K add-on memory module called a RAM Pack, (lower right in the picture,) which increased the memory to 18K. I believe there was also a 64K RAM Pack available later. The ones sold in Britain were known as the ZX 81. It had no display but you could hook it up to the VHF antenna connections on the back of your television set. It also didn't have any sound. The operating system was a modified version of the BASIC computer language and it gave a lot of people, including me, their first taste of computer programming. There were a number of programs that you could buy for it. They were all on cassette tapes. What you would do is connect the unit to your TV set, plug your cassette tape player into it and put whatever program you might have into the tape player. You had to turn the volume off on your cassette player because the programming code was just one continual screeching sound. I had a cassette tape that had a few different programs on it. All of the characters in the programs were block-headed type graphics, but they actually would walk across the screen and even jump up and down. Cool stuff back then. I remember this costing me $29, as the store I bought it at was getting rid of them. I believe the original selling price was $99. I also bought the 16K RAM Pack for $25. I've kept it all these years in good condition thinking that someday it would be worth something, and I was right. They're selling for about 10 bucks on eBay! Win a few, lose a few. Ironically, these things have somewhat of a cult following, and I've even heard of clubs dedicated to the TS-1000!
Tags: timex  sinclair  ts1000  computer 
Added: 4th September 2007
Views: 1941
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2049
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Umpire Bill Klem 'I never called one wrong!' Bill Klem once immodestly told a reporter. Klem is still widely regarded as baseball's greatest umpire nearly 70 years after he last worked a game. He was a National League arbiter from 1906 through 1941. The innovative Klem (pictured here in 1914) was the first umpire to wear an inside chest protector and the first to use hand signals to keep fans and players informed about his calls. (Klem said, 'The fan in the 25-cent bleacher seat has just as much right to know what I called as the fan in the box seat near home plate.') Klem was so skilled at calling balls and strikes that he only worked behind the plate for a number of years. He worked 18 World Series--a record that will never be broken because MLB now uses a rotation system rather than a merit system to assign umpires to post-season games. Klem was affectionately called 'The Old Arbitrator'--a nickname he adored. The jowly and thick-lipped Klem hated the nickname 'Catfish.' Any player who addressed him that way was quickly ejected. He had a strange relationship with New York Giants' manager John McGraw. Off the field the two were good friends; on the field they feuded bitterly. My favorite Bill Klem story: In 1941, while working the bases, he called a runner out on a tag play at second base. The runner angrily insisted the tag had missed him. Klem informed the irate player, 'I thought you were out.' Then the realization hit him: For the first time in his long career Klem only thought a player was out--he wasn't certain. Klem resigned the next day.
Tags: baseball  umpire  Bill  Klem 
Added: 1st September 2009
Views: 1382
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ramblin Gamblin Man Bob Seger
Tags: The  Bob  Seger  System 
Added: 9th October 2007
Views: 1873
Rating:
Posted By: Marty6697
Del Shannon Runaway Del Shannon was born Charles Weedon Westover in Grand Rapids, Michigan on December 30, 1934. The son of Bert and Leone, Westover grew up in nearby Coopersville, a small farming town. Taught to play the ukulele by his mother as a child, young Charles soon flowered into guitar picking at 14 years of age. The song Runaway, was a number one hit in 1961 in both the US and the UK. Runaway was featured in the following television shows: Beverly Hills 90210: Episodes: Mexican Stand Off, Sweating It Out, Laverne & Shirley (Episode: Diner) CHiPs (The old 70s TV show with Erik Estrada) WKRP In Cincinnati (starring Howard Hessman): Filthy Pictures Episode, Benny Hill Show (Episode 28), South Of Sunset: Dream Girl Runaway is featured in the following movies: Good Will Hunting (Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, Robin Williams), Christine (Bonnie Raitt's version), Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, Kids Of Degrassi Street, Running Scared (Gregory Hines, Billy Crystal), That ll Be The Day, Catch Me If You Can, Buddy System, Children Of The Corn, Born On The Fourth of July (Tom Cruise), Roseaux Sauvages (French Film) Runaway was also used as the theme to Crime Story, the hit U.S. television series from '86 to '88.
Tags: del  shannon  runaway  pop  music   
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 2776
Rating:
Posted By: Tony
Another Blast From The Past  PJ  PROBY PJ Proby was born James Marcus Smith in Houston TX, 11/06/38. I don't know what show this was from, but "Hold Me" was a big hit for Proby in 1964. There's a story about him that goes something like this: PJ was known for his exhausting visional stage performances. It was one of these performances on January 29, 1965, at Fairfield Hall, Croydon in London that Proby, who was the first male ever to wear his hair in a pony tail in the last century at least, burst out of his skin tight velvet bell-bottoms doing his act, based on the black shows he had been used to attending in the rougher areas of Downtown LA. He explained to the frantic press that the ripped clothing was an accident due to the weak velvet material, but when two days later the same thing again happened, the audiences were wild with excitement, as they had never witnessed such body movement onstage or such provocative mood and they loved him. However, the British system that governs the music scene was less enthusiastic. PJ was banned from all theaters in Great Britain and not allowed to perform his recordings on the B.B.C. or A.T.V. television stations. By February 24th, Proby was unable to perform almost anywhere although he was headline news in every newspaper.
Tags: pj  proby  hold  me  60's  rock  and  roll 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 1968
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Mothers Little Helper Miles Laboratories was founded as the DR. MILES MEDICAL COMPANY in Elkhart, Indiana, in 1884 by Franklin Miles, a specialist in the treatment of eye and ear disorders, with an interest in the connection of the nervous system to overall health. By 1890, the sales success of his patent medicine tonic, DR. MILES' NERVINE, in treating "nervous" ailments (including "nervousness or nervous exhaustion, sleeplessness, hysteria, headache, neuralgia, backache, pain, epilepsy, spasms, fits, and St. Vitus' dance") led him to develop a mail order medicine business. Miles also published Medical News, a thinly disguised marketing vehicle for Nervine. Nervine remained on the market as a "calmative" until the late 1960s...
Tags: vintage  ad  dr.  miles  nervine  nerve  pills 
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1703
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Family Affair 1966 Uncle Bill meets Jody for the first time and Sissy for the first time in many years. This wonderful family oriented series which ran from 1966-1971 explored the trials of well-to-do civil engineer and bachelor Bill Davis (Brian Keith), as he attempted to raise his brother's orphaned children in his luxury New York City apartment. Davis's stuffy English butler Mr. Giles French (Sebastian Cabot), also had adjustments to make as he was usually saddled with the responsibility of caring for 15-year-old Cissy (Kathy Garver) and the 6-year-old twins, Jody (Johnny Whitaker) and Buffy (Anissa Jones). Brian Keith was nominated for an Emmy three times for his role as Uncle Bill. On August 28, 1976, after partying all night at the beach town of Oceanside, California, Anissa Jones was found dead in the bedroom of a friend's house, she was only 18. The coroner's report listed her death as accidental drug overdose. Found in her system were cocaine, PCP, methaqualone and Seconal. The coroner who examined Jones reported that she had died from one of the most severe drug overdoses he had ever seen. In 1984, her brother, Paul Jones, also died of a drug overdose.
Tags: family  affair  brian  keith  sabastian  cabot  kathy  garver  johnny  whitaker  anissa  jones     
Added: 1st December 2007
Views: 2541
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Branch Rickey on Whats My Line Branch Rickey, one of baseball's greatest minds, was a mystery challenger on What's My Line on September 13, 1959. Rickey had twice revolutionized the game: He introduced the farm system in the 1920s. He also signed Jackie Robinson to a contract, effectively racially integrating the major leagues. Rickey's proposed Continental Baseball League never got off the ground, but it did prompt the exisitng major leagues to grant expansion franchises.
Tags: Branch  Rickey  Whats  My  Line 
Added: 8th March 2009
Views: 1213
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Silent Film Night Before Christmas TOM EDISON This is for the real old timers.I went to his museum in West Orange N.J. in the early 60's and one of his actual former employees gave the tour!It's one thing I want to revisit. I actually heard Mary Had A Little Lamb.The 1st recording played back; with Edisons voice which led to the 1st phonograph.The museum is now run by the U.S.National Park System.
Tags: entertainment  silent  film  night  before 
Added: 3rd January 2008
Views: 1215
Rating:
Posted By: tommy7

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 of 7 | Random