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Battle of Santiago - 1962 World Cup One of the dirtiest sports events ever to take place was a 1962 World Cup match between Chile and Italy. This BBC clip shows how out-of-control the situation became. On May 22, 1960 Chile was rocked with a devastating earthquake that measured 9.5 on the Richter scale. At the same time the earthquake struck, Chile had been lobbying FIFA to host the 1962 World Cup. Despite the enormous tragedy--and perhaps because of it--FIFA was persuaded by an emotional appeal by the Chilean organizers and won the right to host the tournament. Several Italian journalists criticized Chile's ability to host such an important event. They went too far by insulting everything to do with the South American country, including the virtue of its women. All Italians became hated in Chile. The journalists were forced to flee the country. An Argentinian reporter, mistaken for an Italian, was severely beaten by a mob. Of course Italy and Chile were drawn into the same group so they had to play one another in Santiago on June 2. In presenting recorded match highlights for the UK, BBC reporter David Coleman minces no words about the brutal spectacle that occurred that day.
Tags: soccer  World  Cup  1962  Italy  Chile  Battle  of  Santiago 
Added: 16th April 2015
Views: 1037
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Posted By: Lava1964
Polio Ward Photo This photo from the 1930s shows a hospital's polio ward where children were placed in iron lungs to assist their breathing. Polio epidemics were a frequent occurrence in the first half of the 20th century in industrialized countries. They were actually a strange bi-product of affluence. By the beginning of the 20th century, a significant amount of babies were being born in the antiseptic conditions of hospitals rather than at home. This meant that many infants were not exposed to the polio virus and thus did not build up an immunity to it. Therefore when they were exposed to it later in life, they were vulnerable. Although the disease mostly afflicted children, adults were not necessarily immune. (President Franklin Roosevelt was crippled by polio at age 39.) The polio virus moved from one person to the next via human bodily fluids. Children who sneezed and coughed were the main culprits. The first symptoms varied. Sometime people had runny noses, sore throats, or aches. However, the minor discomforts could quickly change to partial paralysis if it struck one's central nervous system. Whenever a major polio outbreak hit, many public facilities such as swimming pools and parks would shut down. The last major outbreak occurred in 1952. By the mid-1950s the Salk and Saban vaccines had done much to eradicate the virus from North America.
Tags: polio  ward  photo 
Added: 16th June 2015
Views: 1059
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 1523
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ball Night Causes MLB Forfeit - 1995 I bet you didn't know there have been 139 forfeits in Major League Baseball history. The most recent occurred on August 10, 1995 when the Los Angeles Dodgers forfeited a game to the St. Louis Cardinals in the ninth inning. It happened to be "Ball Night" at Dodger Stadium--so the crowd was conveniently armed with free autographed baseballs that had been given out to them when they passed through the turnstiles. Three times the crowd reacted hostilely when calls went against the home team, littering the field with baseballs. With the Dodgers trailing 2-1 in the ninth inning, another barrage of baseballs descended from the seats when Raul Mondesi struck out. (Plate umpire Jim Quick's strike call on the 3-1 pitch was, admittedly, horrible.) Crew chief Bob Davidson had enough of the missiles and terminated the game. Here's ESPN's brief report on what happened.
Tags: forfeit  MLB  Dodgers  Ball  Night 
Added: 1st June 2017
Views: 998
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 1081
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Posted By: Lava1964
Helen Wills - Tennis Champion Tennis player Helen Wills (later Helen Wills Moody), a California girl, captured the U.S. National Championship at Forest Hills at age 17 in 1923--the second-youngest female to manage the feat at that time. In an era when male sportswriters believed that being a female sports champion and being a beauty were incompatible, Wills proved them wrong. Wills' natural good looks turned heads wherever she played and won. She won often. The fact that Wills captured 19 Grand Slam singles tiles between 1923 and 1938 also enhanced her popularity. One writer said of Wills that "every male between the age of six and 60 was a little bit in love with her." In a six-year period from 1927 to 1933, Wills won every singles match she played without dropping a set! Standing about 5'7" with a muscular frame, Wills rarely showed emotion on the court and was dubbed Miss Poker Face. The nickname was coined by a New York sports journalist named Ed Sullivan. (Yes--that Ed Sullivan!) Charlie Chaplin, an avid tennis fan and a fan of attractive women, said the most beautiful thing on Earth was watching Helen Wills play tennis. Wills struck the ball with great power from an irregular stance: Her body faced forward rather than to the side when she made contact with the ball. Late in her life, Wills was asked if the modern, larger-faced racquets would have improved her game, she said, "No, I always struck the ball in the middle of my racquet, so I don't think a larger size racquet would have made any difference." Wills lived to be 92 years old, passing away on New Year's Day 1998.
Tags: tennis  Helen  Willis 
Added: 19th April 2018
Views: 780
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Posted By: Lava1964

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