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Old School Music Downloads Tags: Old  School  Music  Downloads  radio  cassette  recording  audio  tap 
Added: 18th September 2014
Views: 1816
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Posted By: pfc
Columbia House Music Tags: Columbia  House  Music  Record  Collection  8-Track  Cassettes  music 
Added: 31st December 2014
Views: 761
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Sad Decline of Benny Hill In 1990 The Benny Hill Show was airing in reruns in 97 countries around the world--but not in Great Britain where it had originated. The scourge of political correctness had forced Thames Television to end its association with Hill in 1989 after 20 successful years. Thames defended the move by saying Hill's periodic specials were becoming too costly, viewership was down, and the 65-year-old Hill was looking tired. However, by the late 1980s it was becoming unfashionable for Hill's sexually charged farcical comedy skits to be shown on British TV. (One anti-Hill crusader wildly blamed The Benny Hill Show for all the sexual assaults in the UK!) Hill did not need the money, but he did miss being on TV. He had open offers to appear in Las Vegas and name his price, but Hill did not want to make the journey overseas. Hill was a true loner who never married and was not known to have had a long-term relationship with anyone. The few friends he had said his dismissal by Thames was akin to handing Hill a death sentence. With assets worth more than 7.5 million British pounds, Hill was a bit of a miser. He never owned a car, he did his own shopping, and he lived in a very modest flat. He was also a slob. His flat was usually filled with dirty dishes, papers strewn everywhere, and dirty clothes on the floor. A friend once asked him why he threw his clothes on the floor. "Because they won't stick to the ceiling!" was his pithy answer. In February 1992, the 68-year-old Hill suffered mild heart attack. He was ordered to go on a diet. Two months later he died of another heart attack while sitting in a favorite chair in front of his television. His body was not discovered for three days. Hill's will had not been updated since 1961. The will's beneficiaries (his parents and his sister) had already died. The comedian's vast fortune was eventually split among nieces and nephews whom Hill had barely known. Among those who considered Benny Hill a comic genius were people as diverse as Charlie Chaplin, Michael Jackson and Walter Cronkite!
Tags: Benny  Hill  death  decline  comedy  UK 
Added: 29th October 2014
Views: 1515
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Kate Bradley Petticoat Junction was one of CBS' rural-themed hit shows of the 1960s. Set in a quaint hotel outside of Hooterville, it fared best in the ratings during its first two seasons (1963 to 1965) when it was filmed in black and white. Although there were numerous cast changes during the show's run--for example, three different actresses played oldest daughter Billie Jo Bradley--the linchpin of Petticoat Junction was family matriarch Kate Bradley, a kindly widow played by veteran TV and radio actress Bea Benaderet. Kate was the voice of reason in most episodes who kept order in both the Shady Rest Hotel and among her family members. In early 1968 Benaderet was stricken with cancer and took a leave of absence. At one point she appeared in just three of 11 episodes. Kate's absence was explained as her being away on a long trip. After initially good medical reports, Benaderet was kept in the Petticoat Junction cast. However, when the 1968-69 season was to begin, Benaderet's cancer returned and she was too ill to continue her role as Kate Bradley. In a few episodes only her voice was heard. In some cases a double was used in scene in which Kate was only seen from the rear. Benaderet died on October 13, 1968, but her character never really died on the show. On a few episodes, she was seen in flashbacks. Although June Lockhart joined the cast as its new older female character, Kate Bradley was never mentioned as being deceased, but she was seldom mentioned after 1969. Only once in the final season was Kate even alluded to: Youngest daughter Betty Jo explained that she and her sisters were taught to swim in the train's water tank by Kate. Petticoat Junction was cancelled after the 1969-70 season. The Mary Tyler Moore Show replaced it in the CBS lineup on Saturday nights.
Tags: TV  Petticoat  Junction  Kate  Bradley  Bea  Benederet 
Added: 4th November 2014
Views: 1020
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Posted By: Lava1964
Great Blizzard of 1888 Snowstorms have paralyzed major cites for as long as North America has had major cities. The most devastating storm was likely the Great Blizzard of 1888 that crippled most of America's major eastern seaboard cities north of Washington, DC and into Canada. What made this blizzard so bad was that it came as a total surprise. In the days leading up to March 12, 1888, there had been unseasonably mild weather. People on the streets of New York City were walking around without overcoats. The "Great White Hurricane," as some folks dubbed it, struck with a fury. Torrential rains began falling, and on March 12 the rain changed to heavy snow, temperatures plunged, and a ferocious wind began. The storm continued unabated for the next 36 hours. Sources vary, but the National Weather Service estimated that 50 inches of snow fell in Connecticut and Massachusetts and 40 inches covered New York and New Jersey. Winds blew up to 48 miles an hour, creating snowdrifts 40 to 50 feet high. The resulting transportation crisis led to the creation of the New York subway, approved in 1894 and begun in 1900. Telegraph and telephone wires snapped, isolating New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington for days. Two hundred ships were grounded, and at least 100 sailors died. Fire stations were immobilized, and property loss from fire alone was estimated at $25 million. Overall, more than 400 storm-related deaths were reported.
Tags: Blizzard  1888 
Added: 24th November 2014
Views: 897
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Posted By: Lava1964
Watchmen Debuts In 1986, Watchmen, written by Alan Moore and illustrated by David Gibbons, made its debut. Set in an alternate reality where superheroes actually exist, Watchmen was one of the first major graphic novels. The main plot revolved around the violent vigilante Rorshach as he investigated the death of The Comedian, an amoral war hero. along the way, he uncovers a conspiracy that changes the course of history.
Tags: Comics 
Added: 5th December 2014
Views: 528
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 1379
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Posted By: Cathy
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1279
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Posted By: Lava1964
Have It Your Way at Burger King Tags: Have    It    Your    Way    at    Burger    King    hold    the    pickles    hold    the    lettuce    special    orders    don't    upset    us   
Added: 4th March 2015
Views: 826
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Patent Shows Proper Way To Hang Toilet Paper Tags: Patent  Shows  Proper  Way  To  Hang  Toilet  Paper  US  Patent  office  great  debate  Seth  Wheeler  perforated  paper   
Added: 19th March 2015
Views: 775
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Posted By: Steve

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