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What Is The Connection Between These Two Obects Tags: What  Is  The  Connection  Between  These  Two  Obects,  Cassette  Tape,  Bic  Pen 
Added: 23rd December 2011
Views: 1018
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Posted By: Music Maiden
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 3763
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 – February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 6800
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Posted By: Lava1964
Telegraph Road Dire Straits. Marty mentioned front to back albums. Here's one of my favourites. Love Over Gold. A set of headphones a coffee then sit back and disappear into the sounds. I know it's a long track, But.
Tags: Love  Over  Gold  Dire  Straits  Telegraph  Road 
Added: 13th April 2012
Views: 1001
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Posted By: donmac101
Death of Salvador Sanchez - 1982 Boixing lost a terrific champion way too early in the summer of 1982. Salvador Sánchez of Mexico was well on his way to becoming the greatest featherwight boxer of all time. Sánchez was 44-1-1 in 46 career fights. He had upset popular Danny (Little Red ) Lopez in February 1980 to win the WBC version of the 126-pound title. He went on to defend it numerous times in the next 30 months. Sánchez was a skilled boxer/puncher who could wear down an opponent with accurate, sharp, stinging blows. He was, not surprisingly, a national hero in Mexico. Sadly Sánchez was killed in a sngle-car crash in Mexico on August 12, 1982. He was just 23 years old. At the time he was training for a rematch with the tough Juan Laporte. Sánchez had beaten Laporte in December 1980. Sánchez's last fight was a skillful 15-round knockout of Azumah Nelson in New York City's Madison Square Garden about three weeks before the fatal car accident. Sánchez crashed on the early morning while driving his Porsche 928 sports car along the Mexican federal highway from Santiago de Querétaro to San Luis Potosí, dying instantly. Sánchez was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.
Tags: boxing  Salvador  Sanchez 
Added: 14th May 2012
Views: 5790
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 1837
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Posted By: Lava1964
1981 - St. Louis Skyline at the Gateway Arch The St. Louis Skyline at the Gateway Arch, 1981 at Sunset
Tags: St  Louis  Arch  1981  Missouri  Jefferson  National  Expansion  Memorial 
Added: 28th May 2012
Views: 1410
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
Manchester United Plane Disaster - 1958 One of the great sports tragedies of the twentieth century was the Munich Air Disaster. It occurred on February 6, 1958, when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On board the plane was the glamorous Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes" (after manager Matt Busby), along with a few supporters and sports journalists. Twenty of the 44 people on board the aircraft died instantly in the crash. The injured, some of whom had been knocked unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in a total of 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, against Red Star Belgrade, but had to make a stop in Munich to refuel the aircraft. After refuelling, the pilots, Captains James Thain and Kenneth Rayment, attempted to take off twice, but had to abandon both attempts due to boost surging in the port engine. Fearing that they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off attempt. By the time of the third attempt, it had begun to snow, causing a layer of slush to build up at the end of the runway. When the aircraft hit the slush, it lost velocity, making take-off impossible. It plowed through a fence past the end of the runway, before the port wing hit a nearby house and was torn off. Fearing that the aircraft might explode, Captain Thain set about getting the surviving passengers as far away as possible. Despite this threat, Manchester United goalkeeper Harry Gregg remained behind to pull survivors from the wreckage. An investigation by West German airport authorities originally blamed Captain Thain for the crash, claiming that he had failed to deice the wings of the aircraft, despite statements to the contrary from eyewitnesses. It was later established that the crash had, in fact, been caused by the build-up of slush on the runway, which had resulted in the aircraft being unable to achieve take-off velocity. Accordingly Thain's name was eventually cleared in 1968--a decade after the incident. At the time of the disaster, Manchester United were trying to become only the third club to win three successive English league titles; they were six points behind League leaders Wolverhampton Wanderers with 14 games to go. They were also holders of the Charity Shield and had just advanced into their second successive European Cup semi-final. The team was also on an 11-match unbeaten run, and had advanced to the Fifth Round of the FA Cup tournament two weeks before the crash. Real Madrid won the European Cup in 1958, but team officials generously offered to have Manchester United declared the winners. This plan was not approved by UEFA, however. Manchester United did win the European Cup ten years later. Two of the survivors from 1958 were on that 1968 team.
Tags: soccer  Manchester  United  disaster  airplane 
Added: 7th June 2012
Views: 3672
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Posted By: Lava1964
AfterMASH TV networks can't leave well enough alone. In February 1983, MASH exited the airwaves in a blaze of glory after 11 successful and brilliant seasons of quality television. Seven months later, CBS reunited a few of its characters in a sequel titled AfterMASH. (The title was intended to be a pun on "aftermath".) The show was set immediately following the end of the Korean War and chronicled the adventures of three characters from the original series: Colonel Potter (played by Harry Morgan), Klinger (Jamie Farr) and Father Mulcahy (William Christopher). By several quirks of fate, all three end up working at a veterans' hospital in Missouri. Rosalind Chao rounded out the starring cast as Soon-Lee Klinger, a Korean refugee whom Klinger met in the last two episodes of MASH and married at the end of the series. AfterMASH premiered on September 26, 1983 in the same Monday night 9:00 p.m. EST. time slot that MASH once had. Curious and faithful MASH fans provided vast audience numbers for that first broadcast. AfterMASH debuted at #1 in the weekly TV ratings--the first time a new show had done that since Laverne and Shirley. It finished 10th out of all network shows for the 1983-1984 season according to Nielsen Media Research television ratings. For its second season CBS disastrously moved the show to Tuesday nights at 8:00 p.m. EST., opposite NBC's top-ten hit The A-Team. CBS launched an optimistic marketing campaign featuring illustrations by Sanford Kossin of Max Klinger in a nurse's uniform, shaving off Mr. T's signature mohawk, theorizing AfterMASH would take a large portion of The A-Team's audience. The exact opposite occurred: AfterMASH's ratings plummeted to near the bottom of the television rankings and the show was canceled just nine episodes into its second season. Twenty-nine AfterMASH episodes had aired, one was shown as late as May 1985. A thirtieth episode was completed but was never broadcast. Comparisons to the original MASH were inevitable and largely unfavorable. In 2002, TV Guide listed AfterMASH, perhaps uncharitably, as the seventh-worst TV series ever.
Tags: TV  AfterMASH  sequel 
Added: 19th June 2012
Views: 1687
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Marshall SI Cover Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers (shown here on an SI cover) was the National League's Cy Young Award winner in 1974. He finished third in league MVP voting as well. A screwball pitcher, the indefatigable Marshall appeared in 106 games in 1974. Thirteen of those appearances were in consecutive games. Both marks are modern MLB records. Marshall was a bit of an eccentric for his day. He was a student of kinesiology and nearly quit baseball after 1974 to pursue his PhD. He believes that proper mechanics can totally eliminate pitchers' arm injuries. He was also dead set against signing autographs--especially for kids. Why the reluctance to sign? Marshall believed professional baseball players should not be revered as heroic figures by children. (The Cincinnati Reds, the "establishment team" of the 1970s, loathed Marshall because of his no-autograph policy--and because he made the difference in the Dodgers winnng the 1974 NL West title instead of the Reds.) The scarcity of Marshall's autograph makes it valuable and desirable to collectors. More often than not, the rare specimens of it are written as "Dr. Mike Marshall."
Tags: baseball  Mike  Marshall  SI  cover 
Added: 25th June 2012
Views: 1127
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Posted By: Lava1964

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