Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
The Blues Image  Ride Captain Ride Sending this one out to SWEETS50. "Ride Captain Ride" is a song recorded by the American rock band Blues Image. The song was co-written by the band's singer-guitarist Mike Pinera and keyboardist Frank "Skip" Konte. It was included on the group's 1970 album, Open. Released as a slightly shortened single in the spring of 1970, it shot up the charts, eventually reaching #4, making it Blues Image's first (and only) chart hit. The tasty clean guitar fills and main solo were performed by Kent Henry. Mike Pinera plays the rocking guitar solo at the end of the song.
Tags: blues  image  ride  captain  ride 
Added: 29th May 2008
Views: 1507
Rating:
Posted By: rickfmdj
Please Dont Go - Aerosmith-Marty Sending this one out to Marty!
Tags: Please  Don't  Go  -  Aerosmith-Marty 
Added: 10th June 2008
Views: 906
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
America Comes of Age The Korean War America Comes of Age - The Korean War Like Lambs to the Slaughter US defense spending had reached a modern day low. The military was ill-prepared and ill-equipped, those in authority embraced questionable doctrines. From a post World War II soft life in Japan, with servants to wash their clothes and shine their boots, these American youth were suddenly uprooted and flung into harm's way. There was no "Remember Pearl Harbor." The North Korean People's Army was on a roll. The North Korean People's Army had invaded the Republic of Korea in South Korea only 11 days earlier and overwhelmed the ill-equipped Republic of Korea armed forces. The North Korean People's Army steamrolled into Seoul, driving refugees and regrouping Republic of Korea Army units before it, clogging roads and throwing the countryside into a panic. The invasion caught General Douglas MacArthur and his Far East Command and Eighth Army by surprise, despite recent intelligence reports that North Korea was planning for an attack on the Republic of Korea. General MacArthur had disregarded the reports, saying he did not believe war with North Korea was imminent. The events that unfolded on the Korean peninsula some 45 years ago offer a telling reminder of what happens when a force goes to war unprepared. Disaster lurks around every bend. Facing a force of 130,000 NKP soldiers, 3,000 Soviet advisors, a full array of heavy weapons, aircraft and the formidable T-34/85, arguably the best tank to come out of World War II. American GIs fought bravely at times. At other times when confronted with overwhelming, numerically superior forces, they "bugged-out" to the rear, cursing their government for sending them to this stinking, God-forsaken place where human feces were used to fertilize the land. Photos The Library of Congress The Korean War National Museum U.S. Army Center of Military History Democratic People's Republic of Korea Audio Clips The Library of Congress - Veterans History Project Wessel's Living History Farm Music Perry Como Far Away Places Aaron Copeland Fanfare for the Common Man John Williams Saving Private Ryan Omaha beach Hymn to the Fallen conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso For more information about the Korean War http://www.army.mil/cmh/ http://www.korea50.mil/ http://americanradioworks.publicradio... http://www.paulnoll.com/Korea/index.html http://www.loc.gov/vets/ http://www.koreanwar.org/html/units/2...
Tags: Korean    War    1950 
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1494
Rating:
Posted By: dalecaruso
Friend Requests- YRT FAQ- Sending and Receiving Sending and Receiving Friend Requests. See comments.
Tags: Sending  and  Receiving  Friend  Requests  on  YouRememberThat.com  YRT  FAQ 
Added: 20th May 2009
Views: 1284
Rating:
Posted By: Admin
End of Western Union Telegrams 2006 On January 27, 2006, Western Union ended more than 150 years of telegram service. Beginning in 1854, the company began transmitting and transcribing telegraphed messages and delivering them to customers across the country. They heyday of the telegram was in the 1920s and 1930s when sending a message by telegraph was cheaper than making a long-distance telephone call. The word 'stop' was commonly used in the text of telegrams to end a sentence instead of a period because it was cheaper to send a four-letter word than a punctuation mark. Telegrams were often used for formal notifications and announcements, such as the one below to inform the recipient that he would share the 1958 Nobel Prize for Medicine/Physiology. During the Second World War, Western Union couriers were feared because they delivered official death notices to the families of servicemen. Eventually technology made telegrams obsolete and anachronistic. Only about 20,000 telegrams were sent in 2005, mostly by companies that were required to send legal notifications. On that final day of service, ten telegrams were delivered. They included a congratulatory message, a sympathy message, and, of course, a handful of messages from people who were trying to make history by sending the final Western Union telegram. Today Western Union exists only as a company that handles money transfers.
Tags: last  telegram  Western  Union  communications 
Added: 9th March 2010
Views: 3241
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Japanese Skull Controversy This odd photograph was published in the May 22, 1944 issue of Life magazine. It shows the girlfriend of an American soldier writing her beau a thank-you note for sending her part of the skull from a dead Japanese soldier. The photo inspired overwhelmingly negative reposnses from Life readers. Furthermore, it was a propaganda bonanza for the Japanese who used it to portray Allied servicemen as barbaric. Indeed, the mistreatment of enemy corpses was outlawed by the Geneva Convention in 1929. The soldier who mailed the partial skull stateside was reprimanded.
Tags: skull  Second  World  War  Japanese 
Added: 1st April 2010
Views: 4551
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1957 MLB All-Star Voting Scandal The 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game took place on July 9 of that year in St. Louis. Fans determined which players qualified for the game by sending in their votes to the Commissioner's office. However, a major stink arose when seven Cincinnati Reds garnered the most votes. (First baseman Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals was the only non-Red to win his position's voting in the National League.) The Reds who finished atop the polls were Ed Bailey, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Frank Robinson, Gus Bell and Wally Post. The Reds were a good team, but they hardly deserved to dominate the NL All-Star balloting. (They would finish fourth in the eight-team NL in 1957.) An investigation showed that more than half the ballots cast came from Cincinnati. The Cincinnati Enquirer had printed up pre-marked ballots and distributed them with the Sunday newspaper to make it easy for Reds fans to vote often. There were even stories of bars in Cincinnati refusing to serve customers until they filled out ballots. Commissioner Ford Frick partially nullified the election results by appointing Willie Mays of the New York Giants and Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves in place of Gus Bell and Wally Post. In addition, Frick decided to strip the fans of their voting rights. Beginning in 1958, managers, players, and coaches picked the entire team until 1970, when the vote again returned to the fans. The American League won the 1957 MLB All-Star Game 6-5.
Tags: baseball  Cincinnati  Reds  All-Star  Game  election  scandal   
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 3803
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1958 New Jersey Commuter Train Disaster On Sept. 15, 1958, a horrible accident befell a commuter train shuttling passengers from New Jersey to New York City. It was a Tuesday morning after rush hour so the train had only 100 passengers--about a quarter of its capacity. Shortly following 10 a.m., Central Railroad train No. 3314 out of Bayhead stopped at Elizabethport on the western shore of Newark Bay. The train plunged off the end of an open bridge, killing 48 passengers, including a high executive from one of the larger corporations in the country and retired New York Yankees second baseman George (Snuffy) Stirnweiss. Other passengers included an investment banker carrying a brief case that contained $250,000 in negotiable bonds, a federal agent carrying a top secret device for communicating with satellites, and the mayor of a town in southern New Jersey. The accident occurred when the train plunged off the end of a bridge that had opened to allow a boat to pass on Newark Bay. Questions still remain about the accident, and why the crew ignored at least three warnings to stop and arrived at the edge of the bridge at exactly the wrong moment - sending three cars into the turbulent waters below. Although some reports suggest that the train engineer, Lloyd Wilburn, 63, suffered a heart attack before drowning as a result of the crash, the investigation later showed his train moved well above the 22-mile-per-hour speed limit for the bridge and passed through three signals notifying him and other crew members that the bridge was open ahead.
Tags: bridge  train  disaster  New  Jersey 
Added: 30th January 2011
Views: 4582
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gene Stephens 3-Hit Inning On June 18, 1953, 20-year-old Gene Stephens collected three hits in one inning for the Boston Red Sox during a 23-3 victory over the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park. The Bosox exploded for 17 runs in the seventh inning - sending 23 batters to the plate during their 47-minute half of the frame. Stephens had a double and two singles off three different Detroit pitchers. The 17 runs scored by Boston in that inning were two more than the previous modern MLB record, set by the Brooklyn Dodgers in a May 21, 1952, contest against the Cincinnati Reds. The Red Sox had 14 hits in their memorable inning to set a new modern MLB mark in that category. Gene Stephens was mostly a reserve player in his 12 MLB seasons. His batting average was only .204 in 1953, making his three-hit inning on June 18 even more surprising. The Red Sox led 5-3 going into their half of the seventh inning. Detroit pitcher Steve Gromek allowed nine of the 17 runs while Dick Weik and Earl Harrist each allowed four. Boston had 27 total hits in the game. The day before, they had 20 hits when they walloped Detroit 17-1. “I was the youngest ballplayer in the major leagues at the time,” Stephens recalled years later, whose three-hit performance was witnessed by only 3,108 Fenway fans that afternoon. “I probably shouldn’t have even been in the major leagues at that time. Ted Williams had gone to the Korean War and, therefore, that gave me the opportunity to play. As soon as [Williams] came back, the Red Sox optioned me down to their AAA team in Louisville." The all-time record for most runs scored in an inning is 18, set by the Chicago White Stockings against the Detroit Wolverines on Sept. 6, 1883, in a National League affair. During that onslaught (also in the seventh inning), three different Chicago players had three hits in the frame: Tommy Burns (two doubles, one home run), Fred Pfeffer (two singles, one double), and Ned Williamson (two singles, one double). The only other hitter in modern MLB history (since 1900) with three hits in one inning was Johnny Damon, who was also a member of the Boston Red Sox. Damon achieved his feat when Boston whipped the Florida Marlins 25-8 on June 27, 2003. Damon collected three hits (a single, double, and triple) in the first inning as the Bosox scored a record 10 runs before any Boston batter was put out.
Tags: baseball  Gene  Stephens  hits  Red  Sox 
Added: 27th May 2012
Views: 2091
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random