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Things We Wish We Hadnt Seen Sec of State Colin Powell and 6 US officials do a take off of the Village People at Asia's Security Meeting in Jakarta. Scary isn't it?
Tags: colin  powell    senators  asia  security  meeting 
Added: 13th November 2007
Views: 1370
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Posted By: Guido
Ty Cobb Day 1924 Detroit Tigers' great Ty Cobb was honored by local dignitaries before a home game at Navin Field versus the Washington Senators on Saturday, May 10, 1924. Cobb, 37, who was in his 20th season with the Tigers, was given a set of books as a token of appreciation for his many exploits on the baseball field. (Detroit's ballpark was called Navin Field in 1924. It was later renamed Briggs Stadium and then finally renamed Tiger Stadium.)
Tags: Ty  Cobb  baseball 
Added: 13th July 2008
Views: 2563
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Posted By: Lava1964
Walter Johnson One of my all-time favorite baseball players: Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators. The scouting report on Johnson's blazing fastball noted, 'You can't hit what you can't see.' Once Johnson pitched three complete-game shutouts in a single weekend. For years his lifetime total of 3,508 strikeouts seemed insurmountable. Johnson retired in 1927. It took nearly 50 years for another pitcher to reach 3,000 strikeouts. Johnson became a beloved baseball figure--largely because he had the misfortune to spend his entire career with the lowly Senators. In 1924, when Johnson finally got to pitch in a World Series at age 36, the public rejoiced when he won the seventh and decisive game to give Washington its only World Series triumph.
Tags: Walter  Johnson  baseball 
Added: 17th July 2008
Views: 987
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Posted By: Lava1964
1933 World Series Scorecard The 1933 World Series pitted the National League champion New York Giants versus the American League champion Washington Senators. (The team was officially the Nationals, but they were commonly called the Senators by baseball writers and fans.) Both managers were player/managers. Bill Terry, New York's first baseman, was in his first full season as Giants' manager. Likewise, Joe Cronin was in his first full season as the Senators' pilot. Cronin played shortstop for Washington. This is what a souvenir scorecard from Washington's Griffith Stadium looked like. The Giants won the first two games at the Polo Grounds, lost the third game at Griffith Stadium, but won the next two--both in extra innings--to capture the World Series in five games. To date, Game Five, on October 7, was the last World Series game played in Washington.
Tags: 1933  World  Series  scorecard 
Added: 9th December 2009
Views: 1783
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Posted By: Lava1964
Banana-Blade Hockey Sticks The blades on hockey sticks used to be completely straight. In 1927, Cy Denneny of the Ottawa Senators briefly experimented with a blade he had curved using hot water. Nothing came of it. Four decades later, Stan Mikita of the Chicago Blackhawks partially broke the blade of one of his sticks during a practice. He took a shot with it for kicks. Voila! The puck did some fancy dancing through the air much like a knuckleball does. Mikita and teammate Bobby Hull began experimenting with different versions--some with ridiculous curves they dubbed 'banana blades.' Although they had some obvious drawbacks--accurate passing and backhand shots were much more difficult--the warped pieces of wood immediately became formidable weapons. Of course, the banana blades were universally despised by goalies because the netminders had no idea where the puck was headed. (In all honesty, neither did the shooters!) In an era when some goalies didn't wear masks, there was a serious risk of injury, so the extreme blades were outlawed. Today a curve of only 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch is permitted in organized hockey. A hockey ref once told me that if you put a dime on its edge and it fits under the blade of a stick, the curve is illegal.
Tags: hockey  banana  blades 
Added: 29th November 2010
Views: 2464
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ted Williams SI Cover 1969 It's difficult to picture Ted Williams in anything but a Boston Red Sox uniform, but he was the manager of the lowly Washington Senators for a time. (In fact, Williams was the last manager the Senators ever had. He held that job from 1969 through 1971. When the team became the Texas Rangers in 1972, Williams managed the club in their first season.) Here he is on the cover of Sports Illustrated at age 50 in 1969.
Tags: baseball  Ted  Williams  manager 
Added: 7th December 2011
Views: 1405
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Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 3132
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Posted By: Lava1964
Senator Dirksen - Gallant Men Now for something a little bit different: One of the most recognizable senators of the 1950s and 1960s was Everett Dirksen of Illinois. His disheveled appearance belied a quick mind and masterful debating skills. Dirksen was so well known that he was a mystery guest on What's My Line? in 1967 and a special guest on Red Skelton's variety show. Although he was staunchly conservative, Dirksen was one of the senators most responsible for drafting civil rights legislation. In 1966 Dirksen recorded Gallant Men which cracked the Billboard top 40.
Tags: Senator  Everett  Dirksen  Gallant  Men  record 
Added: 2nd April 2015
Views: 598
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Posted By: Lava1964

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