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Willie and Joe Perhaps some of you may remember "Willie and Joe." The two World War II infantry grunts created by Bill Mauldin. His famous infantrymen cartoons were featured in "Stars and Stripes," the American soldier's newspaper. The cartoons would depict life as the average American soldier would live it during wartime. Some were comical, others brought home the ugliness and tragedies of war. He didn't get along very well with most officers because would poke fun at them in his cartoons. This would irritate the younger officers and some older ones alike. Gen. George Patton wanted him to stop drawing his cartoons but apparently the morale of the American soldier and the popularity of the cartoons and the good effect that "Willie and Joe" had on it won out even over the General's wishes. These two cartoons came from the first collection of his work compiled in a book alled, "Up Front," which was a best-seller. At age 23 he won the Pulitzer Prize. That was in 1945. He was assigned to the 45th infantry division, and was wounded by a shell fragment in Anzio for which he receive the Purple Heart. He also made the cover of Time Magazine in 1958. Bill passed away in 2003 at the age of 81. Bill Mauldin was a great American!
Tags: willie  joe  wwii  bill  mauldin  stars  strpes  cartoons 
Added: 17th September 2007
Views: 2952
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Peter Sellers followed by The Beatles   We Can Work It Out Peter Sellers performing A Hard Days Night followed by The Beatles - We Can Work It Out. This was from a Granada television special on Lennon & McCartney
Tags: peter  sellers  the  beatles  we  can  work  it  out 
Added: 9th October 2007
Views: 20742
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Posted By: Naomi
Your Hit Parade  Opening Opening Intro for the 50's Television show "Your Hit Parade". Your Hit Parade was a popular radio and television program, sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes and broadcast from 1935 to 1955 on radio and telecast from 1950 to 1959. During this 24-year run, the show had 19 orchestra leaders and 52 singers or groups. Each Saturday evening at 8pm, a hit parade of the more popular and bestselling songs of the week were presented. The original format involved a presentation of the top 15 tunes. Later, a countdown with fanfares led to the top three finalists, with the number one song for the finale. Occasional performances of standards and other favorite songs from the past were known as "Lucky Strike Extras." Listeners were informed that "Your Hit Parade survey checks the best sellers on sheet music and phonograph records, the songs most heard on the air and most played on the automatic coin machines, an accurate, authentic tabulation of America's taste in popular music." However, the exact procedure of this "authentic tabulation" remained a secret. Some believe song choices were often arbitrary due to various performance and production factors. The show's ad agencies never revealed the specific sources or the methods that were used to determine the top hits.
Tags: your  hit  parade  50s  television  music 
Added: 11th October 2007
Views: 2208
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Posted By: Naomi
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1118
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita What a great scene from Stanley Kubrick's 1962 film 'Lolita'. In this scene Humbert is checking out a room he's thinking about renting and stumbles upon his deciding factor. Shelley Winters, James Mason, Sue Lyon and Peter Sellers were perfectly cast! Trivia for this is in the Comments.
Tags: lolita  stanley  kubrick  shelly 
Added: 26th February 2008
Views: 1617
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Posted By: Naomi
Peter Sellers Pink Panther I laughed at these clips until I literally had tears streaming down my face. NO matter how many times I watch them, they're still the best comedies that have ever been on the big screen. And Peter Sellers was a natural, his type of comedy can't be learned, it's a gift! So enjoy!
Tags:     peter    sellers    pink    panther    classic    comedy    blake    edwards    inspector  clouseau    henry  mancini1975    1976    1978 
Added: 9th June 2008
Views: 1379
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Posted By: Naomi
Profumo Scandal 1963 The British love a good sex scandal or a good political scandal, so the combination of the two was irresistible in 1963. That year it was revealed that John Profumo, the British Secretary of State for War, who was married, had, in 1961, been having an affair with a much younger showgirl named Christine Keeler (pictured here). What made this especially troublesome for Profumo was that Keeler had also been liberally sharing her renowned horizontal pleasures with Yevgeny Ivanov, a naval attache to the Soviet Union's London embassy. During the height of the Cold War, the potential for dangerous pillow talk was a bigtime security breach. When the affair leaked out, Profumo at first denied the charges in parliament. Three months later he admitted they were true and was forced to resign. His prime minister, Harold MacMillan, himself resigned due to poor health a month later. It was undoubtedly exacerbated by the priapic shenanigans of Profumo. Keeler didn't come out of the scandal unscathed: She served nine months in the sneezer for perjury. The British government's report on the scandal became a national best-seller.
Tags: John  Profumo  Christine  Keeler  scandal 
Added: 22nd January 2009
Views: 1437
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Posted By: Lava1964
MECO - Close Encounters: Disco Theme (1977) Remember Meco? He was selling records by the truckload in the 1970s. This successful disco dance composer, American music producer Domenico Monardo made his mark in the business by creating highly popular strings of LP's and 45's; all in the middle of the 1970s with many film titles as his source of inspiration. Domenico had the opportunity working with Gloria Gaynor on an array of songs in the early 70s with a production company he had help create."Never Can Say Goodbye" was the 1st time a whole album would include non-stoppable dance beats set on a vinyl recording. Remember Donna Summer? She imitated this too. It wasn't Meco's recorded idea though. He was just a part of it at the time. He continued working with Gaynor in that time as well as briefly getting involved with Diana Ross. This time is was as a studio session musician. With the movies, turns out that he was just a fan of them like you. He was really impressed with the "Star Wars" movie soundtrack. He loved the film so much that he wanted to be a part of it. This version of John Williams "Close Encounters" theme was released in the later half of 1977 on an LP called by Meco called 'Encounters Of Every Kind,' from which the 45 single was played on AM radio for weeks after. Meco continued on with the "dance version" of movie compositions right through the early 1980s. He did among others, "Superman," "The Wizard of Oz," "Star Trek," and was especially known for getting his John Williams disco version of "Star Wars" played on radio waves worldwide. The album that sold bigger than the film soundtrack was entitled "Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk." *E*
Tags: 70s  Best  Seller  #1 
Added: 16th August 2009
Views: 983
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Posted By: Electricland
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 2763
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanessa Williams Penthouse Scandal The September 1984 issue of Penthouse magazine was responsible for two major scandals. First, the issue featured explicit, raunchy photographs of recently crowned Miss America Vanessa Williams, some of which showed her getting, ahem, friendly with another female. (They were actually test photos taken by a photographer friend of Williams and not meant for publication.) Nevertheless they were acquired by the magazine and prominently featured in its 15th anniversary edition. It was a huge seller, netting a profit of $14 million for Penthouse. The subsequent uproar caused Williams to voluntarily relinquish her Miss America title. The second controversy did not surface for nearly two full years: The Pet of the Month in that very same issue was rising adult film star Traci Lords. In 1986 it was revealed that Lords was only 16 years old at the time of the photo shoot.
Tags: Penthouse  magazine  Vanessa  Williams  Traci  Lords 
Added: 14th December 2011
Views: 10523
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Posted By: Lava1964

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