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Rick Martin 1951-2011 Hockey fans were saddened to hear of the passing of Rick Martin, 59, one of the National Hockey League's most lethal snipers during the 1970s. The popular and fun-loving Martin combined with Gilbert Perreault and Rene Robert to form the high-scoring French Connection line that led the Buffalo Sabres to the Stanley Cup finals in 1975. According to media reports, Martin was felled by a heart attack while driving alone in the Buffalo suburb of Clarence, NY on Sunday, March 13, 2011. Witnesses say they saw the car's driver, later identified as Martin, keel over at the wheel. His car crossed the center line, crashed into a utility pole, and slid into a tree. Bystanders and police attempted to revive Martin to no avail. In an NHL career that totalled 685 regular-season games from 1971 to 1981, Martin scored 384 goals and added 317 assists. In 63 playoff games, Martin tallied 24 goals and collected 29 assists.
Tags: hockey  Rick  Martin  Buffalo  Sabres  death 
Added: 13th March 2011
Views: 414
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Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 1988
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Posted By: Lava1964
Florence Sally Horner Abduction Case Florence Horner was the victim of a little-known case of child abduction from the 1940s. Had it happened today, it would surely be a media sensation. In 1948, as part of a club initiation, 11-year-old Florence Sally Horner stole a five-cent notebook from a dime store in Camden, NJ. Frank La Salle, a 50-year-old mechanic, witnessed the theft and saw a perverted opportunity: He told Horner he was an FBI agent, and threatened to send her to 'a place for girls like you' if she didn't co-operate with him. La Salle abducted Horner and spent 21 months travelling with her through different American states all the while using Horner as his sex slave. LaSalle posed as Horner's father on their travels, even going as far as enrolling Horner in local schools. While attending school in Dallas, she confided her situation to a classmate. Later she escaped from La Salle and phoned her sister at home, asking her to 'send the FBI.' La Salle was arrested at a California motor court but claimed he was Florence's father. However, an FBI investigation found that Horner's true father had died seven years previously. La Salle was sentenced under the Mann Act to 30 to 35 years in prison. Literary scholars believe the Horner case at least partially inspired Vladimir Nabokov's famous novel Lolita. In fact, there is a reference to the Horner case in Part II, Chapter 33 of the novel. Nabokov also uses the adjective 'Florentine' to describe Lolita--likely an allusion to Florence Horner. Like the fictional Lolita, Florence Horner died young: She was killed in a car accident near Woodbine, New York, on August 18, 1952. Two days later the Associated Press reported, 'Florence Sally Horner, a 15-year-old Camden, N.J., girl who spent 21 months as the captive of a middle-aged morals offender a few years ago, was killed in a highway accident when the car in which she was riding plowed into the rear of a parked truck.'
Tags: kidnapping  Lolita  Florence  Sally  Horner 
Added: 11th May 2011
Views: 1755
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Posted By: Lava1964
Disturbing Saw Ad With this odd ad for Atkins Saws I guess we're supposed to make the connection between saws and beef.
Tags: ad  saws  beef 
Added: 30th May 2011
Views: 1477
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Posted By: Lava1964
Billy West - Chaplin Impersonator Billy West (September 22, 1892 - July 21, 1975) was an actor, producer, and director of the silent film era. He is best known as a terrific Charlie Chaplin impersonator. Born Roy B. Weissburg in Russia, West adopted his professional name some time after emigrating to America. He appeared in many short films, first in Apartment No. 13 in 1912. In 1917 movie theaters couldn't get enough Charlie Chaplin comedies, and an enterprising producer hired West, who had been doing comic pantomimes on the vaudeville stage, to make imitation-Chaplin subjects to meet the demand. West, wearing the identical tramp costume and makeup, copied Chaplin's movements and gestures so accurately that modern audiences often mistake West for the genuine performer. Chaplin himself saw the Billy West company filming on a Hollywood street, and allegedly told West, 'You're a damned good imitator.' Some West comedies were later deceitfully re-released on the home-movie market as 'Charlie Chaplin' pictures. Most of the West comedies of 1917-18 resembled the Chaplin comedies of 1916-17, with Oliver Hardy approximating the villainy of Eric Campbell, and Leatrice Joy in the Edna Purviance ingenue role.
Tags: silent  films  Billy  west  Chaplin  impersonator 
Added: 7th July 2011
Views: 849
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Posted By: Lava1964
Streaker at Academy Awards 1974 Streaking was starting to become all the rage in 1974. It came to the forefront on Oscar night that year when 35-year-old Robert Opel streaked the Academy Awards. Opel, a photographer and art gallery owner, sneaked backstage posing as a journalist. (He had worked as a photographer for The Advocate, a gay/lesbian publication.) Opel ran naked past David Niven, flashing a peace sign while Niven was in the midst of introducing Elizabeth Taylor. Reactions from the audience members ranged from shrieks to gasps to laughter. Television audiences briefly saw only Opel's face and bare torso. Unfazed by the unprecedented disturbance, Niven turned to the audience and quipped, "Well, ladies and gentlemen, that was almost bound to happen... But isn't it fascinating to think that probably the only laugh that man will ever get in his life is by stripping off and showing his shortcomings?" The episode made Opel something of a celebrity. Producer Allan Carr even asked him to streak at a party for Rudolph Nureyev. Opel was murdered on the night of July 7, 1979 during a robbery at his art studio.
Tags: streaker  Oscars  David  Niven 
Added: 15th August 2011
Views: 1425
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Posted By: Lava1964
1992 Little League World Series Scandal In 1992 the Little League baseball team representing Zamboanga City, Philippines won its way through national trials and the Far East series. After brushing aside the competition at Williamsport, PA, the team was crowned the champion of the 46th Little League World Series. Not long afterward, though, the team was stripped of its title after Filipino journalists revealed the team had used ineligible players who did not meet either age or residency requirements. In 1992 the LLWS introduced a new format--round-robins within both the American and International pools. Zamboanga City thumped Kaiserslauten, Germany, then Valleyfield, Quebec to clinch a berth in the International final. They lost a meaningless game to Epyguerrerro, Dominican Republic, but beat them 5-1 when it counted in the International final. The LLWS championship game, on August 29, against Long Beach, California, was a blowout, with Zamboanga City scoring seven runs in the first inning and cruising to an easy 15-4 win. The team was hailed as heroes in the Philippines. Filipino president Fidel V. Ramos awarded the players' families a million pesos. Long Beach head coach Jeff Burroughs remarked that one Filipino pitcher, Roberto Placious, had the poise of a high school or college pitcher. He may have been right! A few days after Zamboanga City's victory, journalist Al Mendoza of the Philippine Daily Inquirer began a series of stories suggesting that some players were ineligible for the LLWS. In response to this allegation, Little League headquarters faxed administrator Armando Andaya questions regarding the players' ages, birth certificates, residence--and a specific question regarding pitcher Ian Tolentino's participation in a tournament in 1990 (suggesting this would have made him overage in 1992). Andaya admitted to violating rules on district representation. Eight players were from outside the Zamboanga City area--some came from as far away as Luzon and were unable to speak Chabacano, the language most commonly spoken in Zamboanga. Little League Baseball promptly stripped Zamboanga City of its title. Under Little League rules at the time, when a team was found to have used an ineligible player, it forfeited only its most recent game. Since the revelation was made after the championship game, that game was declared a 6-0 forfeit victory for Long Beach--which was awarded the LLWS title. The exposed players and parents remained defiant, and accused Little League Baseball of denying them due process. Many Filipinos were outraged at what they saw as a betrayal by Mendoza. (He was given the key to the city of Long Beach!) Nevertheless, fellow Inquirer journalist Armand N. Nocum conducted a further investigation and found that even the six true Zamboangueños were overage--one was at least 15--and thus ineligible. It was further discovered the fraud was based upon the ineligible players assuming the identities of eligible players who had represented the city at the national championships. In some cases, even the parents of the ineligible players assumed false identities to maintain the appearance of propriety. Apparently no lesson was learned by the Zamboanga City Little League. The very next year its team was disqualified from the Filipino national championship tournament in another overage-player scandal.
Tags: cheating  Little  League  Baseball  scandal  Philippines 
Added: 28th August 2011
Views: 1942
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Posted By: Lava1964
Worst Sports Mascot - San Francisco Crab The 1970s saw the beginning of the mascot craze in professional baseball. Before the 1984 season, the San Francisco Giants polled their fans about having a team mascot. The survey indicated that 65% of their fans preferred having no mascot whatsoever. Undeterred, the lowly Giants decided introduced a mascot--but with their own special twist: They created an 'anti-mascot.' The creature they unleashed was the infamous Crazy Crab (see photo below). The idea was to poke fun at traditional mascots. Local television commercials depicted manager Frank Robinson having to be restrained from attacking the crustacean. One critic said the mascot looked like "a wart with distemper." Giant fans were encouraged to boo and hiss the phony mascot, who was portrayed by actor Wayne Doba. The prodding worked all too well. With an awful 96-loss season soothing no souls, Crazy Crab became the object of hatred and abuse--an easy target for disgruntled fans. The crowd would hurl all sorts of things at the beast, both verbally and literally. Even the players got into the act, dumping drinks and other things into the suit. Broadcasters Mike Krukow and Duane Kuiper, both Giant players during the year of Crazy Crab, were asked if they ever had trouble with him. Their response: 'No, we used to drill him with the rosin bag daily, so he was scared of us.' The nightmare for the bug-eyed object of derision ended after just one season. The Giants would not attempt another mascot, 'anti' or real, until 1997. Nevertheless, as late as 2010 there was an unsuccessful Internet campaign to resurrect Crazy Crab.
Tags: baseball  San  Franciso  Giants  crab  mascot 
Added: 22nd September 2011
Views: 879
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Posted By: Lava1964
WE MISS YOU OLD FRIEND I JUST FOUND A POST ON JACK'S PROFILE AND THOUGHT YOU ALL WOULD WANT TO SHARE IN IT. Posted By Judgrn on 17th May 2011: Hello everyone. This is Jack's son. Jack passed away last month (april 2011) Saw his activity here and wanted to let you know. Thanks for all the fun you shared with him. Take care J
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Added: 16th November 2011
Views: 467
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Posted By: Naomi
Get Smart TV Guide Cover 1967 Barbara Feldon and Don Adams of Get Smart grace this TV Guide cover from 1967. Get Smart was an extremely popular spy spoof that ran on NBC from 1965 to 1970 that pitted the counter-espionage activities of CONTROL versus the nefarious deeds of KAOS. The show introduced the phrase "would you believe..." into popular culture. The youthful looking Adams was ten years Feldon's senior. Adams won three consecutive Emmys playing Maxwell Smart (CONTROL agent 86). Feldon was nominated for two Emmys for her role as CONTROL agent 99. Adams was a WWII veteran who was the only survivor from a platoon that saw action on Guadalcanal. Feldon first gained fame by winning the jackpot on The $64,000 Question. Her subject was Shakespeare.
Tags: Get  Smart  Don  Adams  Barbara  Feldon 
Added: 22nd November 2011
Views: 819
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Posted By: Lava1964

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