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McDonalds Arch Deluxe flop McDonalds has had a few flops on their menu over the years. None was more costly than the Arch Deluxe fiasco of 1996. McDonald's marketed the sandwich as an adults-only burger. A very odd $100-million advertising campaign was launched to emphasize the point. Commercials featured kids who didn't want anything to do with the burger. (Some even said it was yucky.) Surveys showed the bizarre ad campaign was turning off potential customers from all demographic groups. Moreover, the Arch Deluxe was the highest priced burger on the menu, which did not help sales either. McDonald's then tried to salvage the burger with a more traditional advertising approach: This time the commercials showed McDonald's icon Ronald McDonald enoying the burger while doing adult activities, such as playing golf. It was too late, though. Even coupons allowing people to buy the burger for just a dollar failed to save the Arch Deluxe from extinction. McDonalds discontinued the sandwich in 1997.
Tags: Arch  Deluxe  McDonalds 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 15326
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Posted By: Lava1964
Can You Hear the Bitter Cry of Children They were called Drivers, Greasers, Oilers, Pushers, Breakers, and Trappers. They salvaged coal from the slag heap, for10 cents for each hundred-pound sack or two dollars a ton. Boys as young as 8, working ten-hour days.. The Photography of Ben Shahn and Louis Wickes Hine Library of Congress shorpy.com http://shorpy.com/ Music: Pete Seeger and The Civil War Soundtrack, Ken Burns producer conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso
Tags: Coal    Mining    Childern     
Added: 26th September 2008
Views: 1580
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Declaration of Independence Copy Found in Picture Frame Fans of flea markets and garage sales were heartened by this improbable story from the spring of 1991: A collector who spent $4 at a Pennsylvania flea market two years ago for a dismal painting because he liked the frame is the possessor of a rare first printing of the Declaration of Independence. It is valued somewhere between $800,000 and $1 million. David N. Redden, head of the book and manuscript department at Sotheby's in Manhattan, described the document, found behind the painting when the collector took the frame apart, as an 'unspeakably fresh copy' of the declaration. 'The fact that it has been in the backing of the frame preserved it,' he said. Of the 24 copies known to survive, only three are in private hands. Mr. Redden said the unidentified owner bought the painting, 'a dismal dark country scene with a signature he could not make out,' only for its gilded and ornately carved frame. He told Mr. Redden that he discarded the painting, which he disliked. When he realized the frame was crudely made and unsalvageable he got rid of it too. 'But he kept the declaration, which he had found behind the painting,' Mr. Redden said. 'It was folded up, about the size of a business envelope. He thought it might be an early 19th-century printing and worth keeping as a curiosity.' Recently the owner showed it to a friend 'who urged him to look into it further,' said Selby Kiffer, an Americana printing specialist at Sotheby's 'At that point he called us.' Said Kiffer, 'The discovery of any first-printing copy of the declaration, even a fragmentary one or a poor copy, would be exciting, but on this one, the condition is beyond reproach. It was folded up when we first saw it--the way the owner said it was in the painting, less than one-tenth of an inch thick. I had to agree with him it was just as well that he kept it that way. There has been absolutely no restoration, no repair. It was unframed and unbacked.' Only seven of the 24 copies are unbacked, he said, which increases their value. 'The ink was still wet on this copy when it was folded,' Mr. Kiffer said. The very first line -- 'In Congress, July 4, 1776' -- shows up in the bottom margin in reverse, as a faint offsetting or shadow printing, one more proof of the urgency John Dunlap, the printer, and others felt in dispersing this document.
Tags: Declaration  of  Independence  copy  found 
Added: 10th February 2011
Views: 5361
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Posted By: Lava1964
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3029
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Posted By: Lava1964
Salvage 1 - Forgotten TV Show Andy Griffith starred in two memorable TV series--but he also was involved in a few stinkers too. In 1979 he played the central character in a far-fetched ABC adventure/sci-fi series titled Salvage 1. Griffith played Harry Broderick, an eccentric junk dealer with high aspirations. In the series' pilot episode, he and his crew built a rocket to fly to the moon to retrieve the space junk abandoned by the NASA astronauts! Later episodes were a little bit more plausible. (For example, one centered on Broderick's crew trying to find a cache of Confederate gold from the Civil War.) Salvage 1 premiered on January 29, 1979. Not surprisingly, the show never really caught on with viewers, and it was not renewed for the fall season. Nevertheless, ABC tried to resurrect it in November 1979 as a replacement for two other short-lived series. Seven new episodes were made but only three aired before ABC pulled the plug for good.
Tags: Salvage  1  ABC  Andy  Griffith 
Added: 21st October 2016
Views: 575
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Posted By: Lava1964

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