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Wilma Rudolph on to Tell The Truth Triple gold medallist Wilma Rudolph appears on To Tell The Truth a few months after her athletic triumphs at the 1960 Rome Olympics. It's amazing to consider how anonymous even the greatest Olympians were in the days before the Olympic Games were widely televised.
Tags: Wilma  Rudolph  atheltics  To  Tell  The  Truth 
Added: 21st March 2013
Views: 900
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Tony LaRussa on To Tell The Truth Tony LaRussa of the Chicago White Sox was the youngest manager in Major League Baseball when he appeared on the short-lived syndicated version of To Tell The Truth hosted by Robin Ward in 1979. Apparently he was unknown too as the impostors fooled the panel! LaRussa ended up accruing the third most wins by a manager in MLB history.
Tags: Tony  LaRussa  MLB  manager  To  Tell  The  Truth 
Added: 21st March 2013
Views: 1096
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1945 Anti-Japanese Propaganda Film This snippet from a 1945 propaganda film was designed to educate Americans about the dangerous powers of the Emperor of Japan and the ruthless army he commanded.
Tags: Second  World  War  propaganda  film  anti-Japanese 
Added: 28th March 2013
Views: 2588
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Frank Bank aka Lumpy Rutherford Dies Fans of the classic sitcom Leave it to Beaver will be saddened to hear of the passing of Frank Bank, one day after his 71st birthday, on April 13, 2013. Bank played the not-too-bright Clarence "Lumpy" Rutherford. In the show's first season Lumpy was an oversized bully who terrorized both Wally and Beaver. Later Lumpy became the inseparable friend of Wally and Eddie Haskell. After Leave it to Beaver went off the air in 1963, Bank went on to become a successful stockbroker. At one point he was a business partner of Jerry Mathers who played Beaver Cleaver.
Tags: Frank  Bank  Lumpy  Rutherford  obituary 
Added: 14th April 2013
Views: 1144
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Lumpy Rutherford - Teachers Daughter Climax We recently lost Frank Bank, the actor who played Clarence (Lumpy) Rutherford on Leave It To Beaver. Here is the climactic moment of an episode titled Teacher's Daughter that first aired on January 7, 1961. In this one, Wally is dating pretty Julie Foster, who happens to be the daughter of one of his teachers. Wally and Julie break up--so Wally assumes his grades from Mr. Foster will take a beating. Conversely, Lumpy starts dating Julie with the expectation of his grades moving higher. Will it happen? Let's see...
Tags: LITB  Lumpy  Wally  Teachers  Daughter 
Added: 19th April 2013
Views: 1820
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Latrell Sprewell - Outrageous Quote Former NBA player Latrell Sprewell had a special gift: He could alienate just about everyone with his astonishing lack of responsibility. In 1997, as a member of the Golden State Warriors, Sprewell was suspended for 68 games after he attempted to choke his own coach who, during a practice, had asked him to make sharper passes. As bad as that incident was, Sprewell is probably best known for rejecting a three-year, $21-million contract extension in 2004 offered by the Minnesota Timberwolves. The amount actually was a pay reduction compared to the $14.6 million he was making in 2004-05 as a 34-year-old. Insulted by the offer, Sprewell publicly expressed outrage, declaring, "I have a family to feed... If [Minnesota general manager] Glen Taylor wants to see my family fed, he better cough up some money. Otherwise, you're going to see these kids in one of those Sally Struthers commercials soon." Sports Illustrated's Rick Reilly had a field day with Sprewell's assertion that he could not feed his family on such a salary. Reilly pointed out, among other things, that Sprewell could buy 18 McDonald's franchises with his $8.3-million-after-taxes income. After declining the Timberwolves' extension, and, having once more drawn the ire of fans and sports media, Sprewell had the worst season of his career in the final year of his contract. In the summer of 2005, the Denver Nuggets, Cleveland Cavaliers, and Houston Rockets all expressed interest in signing Sprewell, but no agreements were reached. Sprewell later lost custody of his children, had his home and yacht reposessed, and declared personal bankruptcy.
Tags: NBA  Latrell  Sprewell  greed  quote 
Added: 6th May 2013
Views: 1870
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bewitched - Final Scene Today we are used to favorite sitcoms ending their runs with big finishes. That seldom used to be the case. Here is the last scene of the 252nd and final episode of Bewitched. It was produced in December 1971 and aired in March 1972. The episode's title is "The Truth, and Nothing But the Truth, So Help Me Sam." It's ordinary plot revolves around a unicorn pin which, because of a spell that Endora has placed on it, compels any mortal close to it to always tell the truth. There is no farewell scene--just Samantha and Darrin fittingly expressing their love for each other as the episode ends. By 1972, Bewitched had been moved by ABC to a deadly Saturday time slot directly against All in the Family. Neverthless, it still attracted decent enough ratings. There were initial plans for a ninth season. However, Elizabeth Montgomery and her husband Bill Asher (who produced the show) were divorcing, so the continuation of Bewitched would have been awkward.
Tags: Bewitched  sitcom  final  scene  1972 
Added: 28th June 2013
Views: 2351
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1927 Snyder-Judd Murder Case It is barely known today, but in 1927 the public was fascinated with the Snyder-Judd murder case. It was unsurpassed in media coverage until the 1936 trial of Bruno Hauptmann for the Lindbergh baby's kidnapping and murder. In 1925, Ruth Snyder, an unhappy housewife from Queens Village in New York City, began an affair with Henry Judd Gray, a married corset salesman. Stuck in a loveless marriage, Snyder began to plan the murder of her husband, Albert, enlisting the help of her new lover, though he appeared to be very reluctant. (Ruth's distaste for her husband apparently began two days after their marriage when he insisted on hanging a picture of his late fiancée, Jessie Guishard, on the wall of their first home. He also named his boat after her!) Ruth Snyder persuaded her husband to purchase an insurance policy that paid double indemnity if an unexpected act of violence killed him. According to Judd Gray, Ruth had earlier made at least seven attempts to kill her husband, all of which he survived. The culprits were not exactly criminal masterminds. On March 20, 1927, the couple garrotted Albert Snyder in his bed and stuffed his nose full of chloroform-soaked rags, then clumsily staged his death as part of a burglary. Detectives at the scene noted that the burglar left little evidence of breaking into the house. The behavior of Mrs. Snyder was wholly inconsistent with her story of a terrorized wife witnessing her husband being killed. Police quickly found the property Ruth claimed had been stolen hidden under the mattress of her own bed. A breakthrough came when a detective found a paper with the letters "J.G." on it. (It was a memento Albert Snyder had kept from former love Jessie Guishard.) They asked Ruth about it. Flustered, Ruth's mind immediately turned to her own lover, whose initials were also "J.G.," and asked the detective what "Judd Gray had to do with this." It was the first time Gray had been mentioned, and the police were instantly suspicious. Gray was located in Syracuse, NY. He claimed he had been there all night, but eventually it turned out a friend of his had created an alibi, setting up Gray's room at a hotel. Gray proved far more forthcoming than Ruth about his actions. He was arrested because his railroad ticket stub was found in his hotel wastebasket! Furthermore, Gray had escaped the murder scene by taking a taxi from Manhattan to Long Island. The cabbie easily remembered Gray because he had only tipped the driver a nickel on a $3.50 fare. He was charged with first-degree murder along with Ruth Snyder. Snyder and Gray blamed each other for plotting the murder. Both were convicted and died in Sing Sing prison's electric chair on January 12, 1928. Snyder was the first woman executed in New York state since 1899. This photo, illegally snapped by a New York Daily News photographer with a hidden camera, was taken at the moment when Snyder was jolted by the electric charge. The Snyder-Judd murder case inspired at least one play and two Hollywood movies: The Postman Always Rings Twice and Double Indemnity.
Tags: murder  Snyder-Judd  case 
Added: 26th November 2013
Views: 1962
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Babe Ruths 60th Home Run Tags: Babe  Ruth's  60th  Home  Run 
Added: 30th September 2014
Views: 1054
Rating:
Posted By: pfc
Babe Ruth - Just Pals This 1931 film, titled Just Pals, was one of a series of short baseball instructional films that Babe Ruth made in the early 1930s. The plot is a little bit on the corny side, but it is a fun peek back in time. Ruth was still in pretty good shape in 1931.
Tags: Babe  Ruth  baseball  instructional  film  Just  Pals 
Added: 9th October 2014
Views: 993
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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