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Thats the way the priceless artifact crumbles I just hope this never happens to Dezurtdude!
Tags: Edison  cylinder  accidently  gets  smashed  on  live  tv 
Added: 4th February 2008
Views: 1460
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Posted By: Old Fart
Y2K Doomsday Hysteria As the year 2000 approached, dire predictions of 'Y2K' major computer malfunctions were predicted for Monday, January 1, 2000. Why? It was feared that the majority of the world's computers--which operated with only a two-digit date to account for the year--would crash because of the double zero. The doomsday crowd predicted the infrastructures of cities would cease to function, transportation systems would come to a screeching halt, financial institutions would be rendered helpless, and chaos would generally be widespread. Businesses small and large were frantically urged to upgrade their computers by the end of 1999 to four-digit years. Companies that sold survival gear reported increased sales as some overly concerned people prepared for civilization around them to crumble. It didn't happen. Only a few minor incidents were reported on January 1, 2000 and the days that followed--which were all quickly rectified. Among the problems: The clock at the U.S. Naval Observatory claimed the date was 'January 1, 19100.' The same peculiar date was reported on computers at some Japanese government offices. About 150 slot machines would not work at a Delaware casino. A Buffalo, NY man who returned a video rental a day late was given a bill that said he owed more than $36,500. (Presumably the video store's computer calculated a 100-year late fee.) Italy and South Korea, two countries regarded as not being especially well prepared for Y2K, had as few problems as zealously prepared countries, leading many people to conclude the Y2K hand-wringing and hysteria was largely unwarranted.
Tags: Y2K  hysteria  computers 
Added: 17th December 2009
Views: 8943
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Posted By: Lava1964
Funeral of King Edward VII This is a still photo of the funeral of Great Britain's King Edward VII in London on May 20, 1910. It brought together a remarkable collection of European royalty never before or afterward assembled. Mourning the 'uncle of Europe' was the new British king, Edward's son, George V. In addition, there were eight crowned heads in the procession: the German Emperor, plus the kings of Norway, Greece, Spain, Bulgaria, Denmark, Portugal, and Belgium. There were about 30 European princes among the mourners too--including Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. His assassination in 1914 was the powder keg that triggered the First World War. Most of the royalty present at Edward's funeral met inglorious ends as many European monarchies crumbled during the war or shortly afterward.
Tags: royalty  funeral  Great  Britain  Edward 
Added: 11th December 2010
Views: 2456
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Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3458
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Posted By: Lava1964
Link Wray Rumble 1958 When Link Wray released the thrilling, ominous "Rumble" in 1958, it became one of the only instrumentals ever to be banned from radio play – for fear that it might incite gang violence. By stabbing his amplifier's speaker cone with a pencil, Wray created the distorted, overdriven sound that would reverberate through metal, punk and grunge. Wray, who proudly claimed Shawnee Indian ancestry and lost a lung to tuberculosis, was the archetypal leather-clad badass, and his song titles alone – "Slinky," "The Black Widow" – convey the force and menace of his playing. "He was fucking insane," said the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach. "I would listen to 'Some Kinda Nut,' over and over. It sounded like he was strangling the guitar – like it was screaming for help." When Wray died in 2005, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen both performed "Rumble" onstage in tribute. "If it hadn't been for Link Wray and 'Rumble,'" said Pete Townshend, "I would have never picked up a guitar."
Tags: Link  Wray  Rumble 
Added: 22nd February 2013
Views: 2948
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Posted By: kinkman

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