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Alex Rodriguez Purse Photo During the sixth game of the 2004 American League Championship Series, Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees slapped the ball out of the glove of Boston Red Sox pitcher Bronson Arroyo who was appplying a tag. (Rodriguez was properly called out.) Some enterprising Red Sox fan doctored the photo of the 'girlie' play to show A-Rod carrying a purse. The comical photo was widely circulated on the Internet.
Tags: baseball  photo  Alex  Rodriguez  purse 
Added: 4th September 2008
Views: 18954
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1969 Baseball Card Prank This 1969 Topps baseball card, despite what it says, is not a picture of Aurelio Rodriguez of the California Angels. It is actually Leonard Garcia, the team's 16-year-old batboy. The prank was orchestrated by Rodriguez himself.
Tags: baseball  card  Aurelio  Rodriguez  Leonard  Garcia   
Added: 11th February 2009
Views: 1273
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gabriel Melgar - Replacement Chico Chico and the Man was a hit sitcom for NBC in the mid-1970s. Starring Freddie Prinze and Jack Albertson, the show debuted in 1974 and centered on the relationship between crusty, aging widower Ed Brown (a "seventh-generation WASP" whose garage was the last white-owned business in his Los Angeles neighborhood) and his Mexican-American employee Francisco (Chico) Rodriguez. Chico and The Man was a regular fixture in the top 10 until Prinze's shocking suicide at age 22 in January 1977. Enough shows with Prinze had been made in advance to last several weeks. The remaining episodes of the 1976-77 season focused on minor cast members. Common sense dictated that NBC should cancel the show, but instead a revamped Chico and the Man debuted in the fall of 1977. Twelve-year-old Gabriel Melgar was cast as illegal-immigrant orphan Raul Garcia who had stowed away in Ed Brown's car when he was returning from a fishing trip to Mexico. Brown referred to Raul as "Chico," explaining to the boy, "You're all Chicos to me!" Prinze's character was said to be visiting relatives in Mexico. However, in one episode Raul finds Chico's belongings in a closet and starts to play his guitar. Ed has an emotional meltdown, smashes the guitar, and eventually explains to Raul that Chico had died. Ratings for the revised version of Chico and the Man were terrible, so the show was axed at the end of the 1977-78 season. Melgar didn't do much in showbiz after the cancellation of Chico and the Man. He appeared in one episode of CHiPs, one episode of Love Boat, and he had a role in a forgettable 1979 action flick titled Jaguar Lives--and that was it. According to one fansite, Melgar is now employed in the biomedical field.
Tags: Chico  and  the  Man  Gabriel  Melgar 
Added: 4th March 2014
Views: 3890
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Speedy Gonzales Deemed Politically Incorrect Speedy Gonzales, the cunning cartoon Mexican mouse that could run at blazing speeds, was first introduced by Warner Bros. in 1953. (Mel Blanc provided Speedy's voice.) By 1999, however, the Cartoon Network ceased to air Speedy Gonzales. In an interview with Fox News on March 28, 2002, Cartoon Network spokeswoman Laurie Goldberg commented, 'It hasn't been on the air for years because of its ethnic stereotypes.' This is widely believed to refer to Speedy's fellow mice, who are all shown as being very slow and lazy, and sometimes even appear intoxicated. This is particularly true of Speedy's cousin, Slowpoke Rodriguez, who is exceptionally slow and lazy. In one cartoon, titled Gonzales' Tamales, the town mice instigate a feud between Speedy and Sylvester the Cat because Speedy has been stealing the hearts of all the females. Much of the dialogue between Mexican characters is in English and the small amount of Spanish that peppers the dialogue consists of basic greetings, goodbyes, exclamations, and misplaced references to popular Mexican foods. Criticism prompted the Cartoon Network to largely shelve Speedy's films when it gained exclusive rights to broadcast them in 1999. However, fan campaigns to put Speedy back on the air and lobbying by the League of United Latin American Citizens saw the shorts return to air in 2002. Ironically Speedy Gonzales remains a very popular character in Latin America. In Mexico, Speedy Gonzales cartoons have been part of the regular programing of Televisa's Canal 5 national channel ever since it was created. In 2010, a Looney Tunes New Year's Day marathon on the Cartoon Network showed the episode 'Mexican Boarders' featuring both Speedy and Slowpoke. On the Looney Tunes Golden Collection, the Speedy cartoons are prefaced by a disclaimer that states: 'The cartoons you are about to see are products of their time. They may depict some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that were commonplace in American society. These depictions were wrong then and are wrong today. While the following does not represent the WB view of society, these cartoons are being presented as they were originally created, because to do otherwise would be the same as to claim these prejudices never existed.'
Tags: cartoons  Speedy  Gonzales  racism 
Added: 29th January 2011
Views: 3255
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Condo -  1983 Sitcom Disaster McLean Stevenson's sixth and final sitcom in the space of 15 years was the short-lived ABC show Condo, which aired for four months in 1983. The premise of the show was that James Kirkridge (Stevenson), a middle-aged insurance salesman, was experiencing a gradual reversal in finances. Accordingly, his family had to downgrade their lifestyle so much that he and his wife Kiki (Brooke Alderson) had to sell their rambling, palatial house in the suburbs and downsize. Jesse Rodriguez (Luis Avalos), an upwardly mobile native of the Los Angeles barrio, had recently become a successful owner of a landscaping business, enabling he and his wife Maria (Yvonne Wilder) to trade up to a more upscale neighborhood. Both couples ended up purchasing condominium units right outside a quaint Los Angeles-area fairway, and became each other's not-so-neighborly next-door neighbors. The Kirkridges initially mistook the Rodriguezes as the condo's groundskeepers. When Jesse informed them that he and his clan were in fact owners of the condo next door, weariness and bigotry ensued, mostly from staunch traditionalist James. Kiki, slightly daffy but strong enough to keep James from stepping too much out of line, was a little more accepting of her Hispanic neighbors, but often experienced culture shock causing occasional friction between her and feisty Maria. There was a Romeo-and-Juliet aspect to the show: The older Kirkridge son fell in love with and married the Rodriguez daughter. Condo was rare for its time as it had an animated opening sequence. Disliked by TV critics and viewers alike, Condo was yanked by ABC after just 13 episodes. Marc Price, who played the younger Kirkridge son, moved on to play Skippy Handelman, the Keatons' awkward yet lovable next-door-neighbor in Family Ties.
Tags: Condo  TV  sitcom 
Added: 21st June 2012
Views: 2694
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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