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FDR Memorial Controversy 1996 In 1996, when plans were announced to erect a memorial to the late Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Washington, D.C., an emotionally charged controversy erupted: Should America's only four-term president be shown in a wheelchair? FDR had been crippled by polio as a 39-year-old in 1921--and he went to great lengths to conceal his condition for the rest of his life. Because of the stigma attached to disabilities at the time, the accommodating media of the day kept FDR's secret from the public. Most photos and newsreels of FDR show him seated behind a desk or in an automobile; FDR was seldom photgraphed in a wheelchair or standing with the help of leg braces. Thus, a passionate dispute arose about how to memorialize FDR. Should he be shown as he truly was or as the public remembered him? This photograph shows the result: In his statue, FDR is draped in a cloak, which presumably hides the wheelchair. This compromise did not suit many advocates for the disabled. A smaller statue of FDR, clearly in a wheelchair, was erected near the main memorial in 2001.
Tags: FDR  memorial  controversy  wheelchair 
Added: 11th October 2009
Views: 7319
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Posted By: Lava1964
vintage Capitol Reel To Reel tape The Tape in the Beautiful Box
Tags: Reel  to  Reel,  Capitol 
Added: 11th January 2010
Views: 1097
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
vintage Capitol Reel To Reel tape A stack of Capitol Reels
Tags: Reel  to  Reel,  Capitol 
Added: 11th January 2010
Views: 1100
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
vintage Capitol Reel To Reel tape inside of one of the boxes
Tags: Reel  to  Reel,  Capitol 
Added: 11th January 2010
Views: 1117
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
vintage Capitol Reel To Reel tape the tape itself
Tags: Reel  to  Reel,  Capitol 
Added: 11th January 2010
Views: 1262
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Posted By: EONSFTFAN
Lost Chaplin Film Discovered For years film historians were puzzled by Charlie Chaplin's claim that he'd had a bit part as a Keystone Cop early in his one-year stint at that famous studio in 1914. Despite the best efforts of silent screen buffs, Chaplin's claim could not be verified until 2010 when a print of A Thief Catcher surfaced in Taylor, Michigan. Film historian Paul Gierucki found the film by chance: The movie buff happened to be browsing in an antiques shop when he found the 16-millimeter reel hidden inside a chest. Originally thinking it was an unimportant Keystone comedy, Gierucki let the flick sit on a shelf in his home for months before deciding to view it. Partway through the film, two Keystone Cops make an appearance. The build, mannerisms and facial features of the smaller cop were undoubtedly Chaplin's. Chaplin's film career has been well chronicled by experts, so his surprise appearance in A Thief Catcher stunned Gierucki. He quickly shared his remarkable find with other silent film fans. Their research confirmed the one-reel comedy had been filmed in January 1914 and released the following month. Like many early silent films, it was believed to have been lost forever. A Thief Catcher was screened at a film festival in Arlington, Virginia in June 2010--presumably its first public showing in 96 years. (This is a frame of the film.) It is now rightfully included among Chaplin's filmography.
Tags: A  Thief  Catcher  Chaplin  Keystone  Cop  lost  film 
Added: 28th November 2010
Views: 1646
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple-Graham Greene Lawsuit Before Graham Greene became a famous novelist, he was a freelance writer and critic for several British publications. In 1937, his review of the Shirley Temple movie Wee Willie Winkie in the magazine Night and Day outraged the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Greene basically described the nine-year-old Temple as sexually provocative. Wrote Greene, 'Infancy is [Temple’s] disguise, her appeal is secret and adult with the seductiveness of a [Marlene] Dietrich...Her well-developed rump twists in a tap-dance...She measures a man with agile studio eyes and dimpled depravity. Her admirers-–middle-aged men and clergymen-–respond to her dubious coquetry and well-shaped and desirable little body...Hear the gasp of her antique audience. Some of her popularity seems to rest on an oddly precocious body as voluptuous in grey flannel trousers as Miss Dietrich’s.' 20th Century Fox sued Night and Day on behalf of their star actress and won a judgment of 3,500 British pounds. The lawsuit bankrupted the magazine.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Graham  Greene  lawsuit 
Added: 18th January 2011
Views: 3814
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Posted By: Lava1964
1960 World Series Kinescope Found In September 2010, baseball fans were thrilled by a remarkable dicovery: A complete kinescope copy of the seventh game of the 1960 World Series was found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar! How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the World Series against the New York Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. “He said, ‘I can’t stay in the country,’ ” his widow, Kathryn Crosby, recalled. “ ‘I’ll jinx everybody.’ ” He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game Seven by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski famously hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees 10-9 at Forbes Field. It is considered one of the greatest and most memorable ballgames ever played. Crosby apparently had more foresight than the television networks and stations, which sadly erased or discarded nearly all the Major League Baseball games they carried until the 1970s. A canny preservationist of all things, Crosby, who died in 1977, kept a half-century’s worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar-turned-vault in his Hillsborough, California home. “Bing Crosby was way ahead of his time,” said Nick Trotta, senior library and licensing manager for Major League Baseball Productions, the sport’s archivist. The kinescope was found quite by accident. A producer searching through Crosby's estate for material for a TV documentary on the late singer's career accidentally came upon five film cannisters marked '1960 World Series.' The 50-year-old game was first shown to a private audience in Pittsburgh that included surviving members of both teams. It was broadcast on the MLB Network in December 2010 and has since been made available to the general public on DVD.
Tags: 1960  World  Series  baseball  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 13th August 2011
Views: 2085
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Posted By: Lava1964
1922 First Mobile Phone Tags:         World          first          mobile          cell          phone          technology          iphone          ipad          ipod          walkman          telephone          nokia          touch          samsung          sony          1920s          demonstration          trial          British          Pathe          Film          Archive          Original          Vintage          Footage          Newsreel          Movie          Video          Documentary          Clip          News          History          Historical 
Added: 2nd January 2012
Views: 3281
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Posted By: Old Fart
1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3799
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Posted By: Lava1964

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