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Johnnie Ray 1927-1990 Johnnie Ray is almost forgotten today, but he was a huge singing star in the early 1950s. At the peak of his career, Ray's income was $35,000 a week. Born in Oregon in 1927, Ray had top 40 hits until 1957. Despite being skinny, pigeon-toed, half-deaf and effeminate, this highly emotional performer was the most popular male singer of the pre-Elvis Presely era. Indeed, when Elvis first started out, he was often introduced on stage as "the new Johnnie Ray". Known as "the Prince of Wails" for his distinctive singing style, Ray is mostly remembered for his lip-quivering early 1950s hits such as Cry; Please, Mr Sun; and The Little White Cloud That Cried. His live performances, in which he sometimes played the piano, were wildly unpredictable. It was not uncommon for Ray to break into tears or flop to the stage floor while belting out a tune. His 1954 recording of Such A Night was the first chart hit to be banned by the BBC for its "suggestive" lyrics. Several American radio stations followed suit. Nevertheless, it still ended up topping the British charts. Ray had an interesting personal life: He became deaf in his right ear at age 13 after an accident at a Boy Scout camp and prominently wore a large hearing aid for the rest of his life. He was twice arrested in Detroit for soliciting sex from men. The first arrest was in 1951 just before he became famous. (He quietly pled guilty and paid a fine.) The second arrest was in 1959, but he was acquitted by an all-female jury. He is rumored to have had a long affair with newspaper writer Dorothy Kilgallen (of What's My Line? fame) that began after his first of two mystery guest appearances on the show. Ray was a heavy drinker who was hospitalized for alcoholism in 1960. He died in 1990, at age 63, from liver disease.
Tags: Johnnie  Ray  singer 
Added: 17th January 2012
Views: 4799
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5560
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Manchester United Plane Disaster - 1958 One of the great sports tragedies of the twentieth century was the Munich Air Disaster. It occurred on February 6, 1958, when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On board the plane was the glamorous Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes" (after manager Matt Busby), along with a few supporters and sports journalists. Twenty of the 44 people on board the aircraft died instantly in the crash. The injured, some of whom had been knocked unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in a total of 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, against Red Star Belgrade, but had to make a stop in Munich to refuel the aircraft. After refuelling, the pilots, Captains James Thain and Kenneth Rayment, attempted to take off twice, but had to abandon both attempts due to boost surging in the port engine. Fearing that they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off attempt. By the time of the third attempt, it had begun to snow, causing a layer of slush to build up at the end of the runway. When the aircraft hit the slush, it lost velocity, making take-off impossible. It plowed through a fence past the end of the runway, before the port wing hit a nearby house and was torn off. Fearing that the aircraft might explode, Captain Thain set about getting the surviving passengers as far away as possible. Despite this threat, Manchester United goalkeeper Harry Gregg remained behind to pull survivors from the wreckage. An investigation by West German airport authorities originally blamed Captain Thain for the crash, claiming that he had failed to deice the wings of the aircraft, despite statements to the contrary from eyewitnesses. It was later established that the crash had, in fact, been caused by the build-up of slush on the runway, which had resulted in the aircraft being unable to achieve take-off velocity. Accordingly Thain's name was eventually cleared in 1968--a decade after the incident. At the time of the disaster, Manchester United were trying to become only the third club to win three successive English league titles; they were six points behind League leaders Wolverhampton Wanderers with 14 games to go. They were also holders of the Charity Shield and had just advanced into their second successive European Cup semi-final. The team was also on an 11-match unbeaten run, and had advanced to the Fifth Round of the FA Cup tournament two weeks before the crash. Real Madrid won the European Cup in 1958, but team officials generously offered to have Manchester United declared the winners. This plan was not approved by UEFA, however. Manchester United did win the European Cup ten years later. Two of the survivors from 1958 were on that 1968 team.
Tags: soccer  Manchester  United  disaster  airplane 
Added: 7th June 2012
Views: 4176
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ann Rutherford 1917-2012 Ann Rutherford, the Canadian-born actress who played Careen O'Hara, the older of Scarlett O'Hara's two younger sisters in the 1939 classic film Gone With the Wind, has died. She was 94. Rutherford, who also portrayed Mickey Rooney's teenage girlfriend in the Andy Hardy movies, died Monday evening, June 11, 2012, at her home in Beverly Hills, said her close friend and fellow actress Anne Jeffreys. Rutherford had recently been in declining health with heart problems. In her later years, as Rutherford was one of the few surviving cast members of GWTW, she was very much in demand to make public appearances at GWTW-themed events although--by her own admission--her role as Carreen O'Hara was a relatively small and unimportant one. Rutherford appeared in about 60 other Hollywood films.
Tags: GWTW  Ann  Rutherford 
Added: 16th June 2012
Views: 1180
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ted Bessell 1935-1996 Remember actor Ted Bessell? He had hoped to be a pianist; as a youth he performed at Carnegie Hall. However, he drifted towards an acting career. He was best known for portraying Donald Hollinger, the steady romantic interest of Marlo Thomas' character Ann Marie on That Girl. The two became engaged in the 1970 season. That Girl ran from 1966 to 1971. Following that series, Bessell starred in the truly awful sitcom Me and the Chimp, which ran for 13 dreadful episodes in 1972. In 1976, he played Joe, Mary Richard's love interest, in two episodes of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. It appeared that Bessell was going to be added as a permanent MTM cast member (and perhaps become Mary's husband), but it never panned out. Bessell was about to direct the big screen version of Bewitched when he died suddenly of an aneurysm in 1996. He was just 61.
Tags: Ted  Bessell  actor 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 1607
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
TV Disaster - My Three Sons Final Season My Three Sons ran for 12 seasons (1960 through 1972), first on ABC then on CBS. It is the second-longest running live-action sitcom in American TV history, behind only The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Despite plentiful cast changes, the departure of three major characters, and implausible plot twists, it remained a reliable ratings-grabber year after year. For most of its time on CBS, MTS enjoyed a favorable Saturday 8 p.m. time slot. Prior to what would be its final season, CBS decided to give its hugely popular new series All in the Family the time slot MTS was accustomed to having. MTS was moved to Monday at 10 p.m.--a horrible time for most kids to watch it. In addition to the time change for the twelfth season, a bizarre storyline was introduced: Fred MacMurray, who played family patriarch Steven Douglas, took on a second role--that of his cousin the Laird (Lord) Ferguson McBain Douglas of Sithian Bridge. English actor Alan Caillou's voice was dubbed for MacMurray's whenever Lord Douglas spoke. The plot centered around Lord Douglas' arrival in Los Angeles from Scotland. He came in search of a First Lady to marry and return with him to Scotland. He found Terri Dowling (Anne Francis), a waitress at the Blue Berry Bowling Alley. While initially reluctant to give up her life in America and return to Scotland as royalty, she finally accepted. This odd storyline was a continuation of a plot idea that originally began in the fourth season, when the Douglases visited Scotland on the pretense of having been told they had inherited a castle. With a later time slot--well after many younger MTS fans had gone to bed--the show finished the season outside the Top 30 for only the second time. In an attempt to save the series, CBS moved MTS in midseason to Thursday at 8:30 P.M. Nevertheless, MTS ended its prime-time run in the spring of 1972. Fred MacMurray, bitterly disappointed, protested the show's cancellation to CBS head honcho Fred Silverman, but to no avail. Although MTS was a staple on the rerun circuit for many years, the awful twelfth season was generally not included in the episodes made available for rebroadcast.
Tags: My  Three  Sons  sitcom  plot  twist 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 3383
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Kazakh National Anthem Gaffe At an international shooting competition in Kuwait in March 2012, a major error in protocol occurred: During the medal ceremony, the gold medal winner from Kazakhstan was serenaded on the podium with the bogus Kazakh anthem from the 2006 satirical film Borat rather than her country's true national anthem. Maria Dmitrienko remained calm while listening to lyrics from the made-up song that insults other countries and touts Kazakhstan's "clean prostitutes." The movie portrays Kazakhs as backward and degenerates. Nevertheless, Dmitrienko left the stage smiling, possibly realizing what had happened. Kazakhstan's shooting team understandably demanded an apology. Ilyas Omarov of Kazakhstan's foreign ministry called the error "a scandal" and promised to undertake an investigation. The event's organizers apparently downloaded the wrong song from the Internet--and also got the Serbian anthem wrong too. This isn't the first time Kazakhstan's national anthem was messed up. At a ski event in northern Kazakhstan earlier that same month, a bit of "Livin' La Vida Loca" by Ricky Martin was played briefly in error before the true anthem played.
Tags: protocol  error  Kazakh  anthem  Borat 
Added: 27th July 2012
Views: 1389
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Commercials October 19 1991 Commercials October 19 1991 1.Jimmy Dean Sausage-("it's Tasty!"...whatta dork) 2.Disney's Fun Bubbles Camera-(your child will enjoy hours of shooting bubbles at the family dog) 3.Johnson & Johnson-(cute baby again) 4.Northern Toliet Tissue-(again) 5.Lunchables-(lady's husband is a big baby until he finds the dessert in his lunchable that she packed him for lunch) 6.Vaporub-(here's a lesson...kids + playing in the rain= them getting sick. Any questions?) 7.Candleshoe Movie ID 8.Oceanspray-(what you can except oceanspray to do for you the the other drinks doesn't is have you acting like you took a hit of LSD) 9.Manufacturers Hanover
Tags: Commercials  October  19  1991 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1024
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Nickelodeon Commercials December 11 1993 Nickelodeon Commercials December 11, 1993 1. "Looney Tunes" End Credits 2. Up Next... 3. Dimension Cable 4. Promo for "Rugrats: The Santa Experience" 5. Shark Attack (OMG I totally forgot about this) 6. Kirby's Pinball Land 7. Happy Chanukah Bumper 8. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 9. Lickin' Lizards (With Michelle Trachtenberg) 10. Baby Get Well (Yep, the cheeks of babies glow neon pink when they're feverish) 11. Huffy Dr. Shock (Dr. Shock is still recovering from his mental breakdown and is prohibited from working with bicycles per a court order) 12. Chuck E. Cheese's 13. Alpha-Bits 14. Barbie Golden Dreams Motorhome 15. Barbie Fountain Pool 16. Promo for "Muppet Babies" 17. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers 18. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 19. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Tournament Fighters (Am I watching a video game commercial or some weird music video for an alternative band?) 20. Kirby's Dreamland (As the owner of a Game Gear, I sort of missed out on the whole Kirby thing) 21. Apple Jacks (With Devin Ratray aka Buzz from the "Home Alone" movies) 22. Station ID (Awesome) 23. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 24. Aladdin Gift Set 25. Sally Secrets (So she hides stickers in her prosthetic feet? Neat) 26. X-Men Video Pack at Pizza Hut (That poster is amazing) 27. Stack-a-saurus Nex (I forgot so many of these cheesy electronic board games) 28. Eat At Ralph's (Vomitastic!) 29. Power Wheels Barbie Lamborghini (While watching her spoiled, delusional child drive around the block, little Cindy's mother thought to herself, "What sort of monster have I created?") 30. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 31. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers
Tags: Nickelodeon  Commercials  December  11  1993 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 3216
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
1973 Wimbledon Boycott In May 1973 Nikola (Niki) Pilic, Yugoslavia's number-one-ranked male tennis player, was suspended by his national tennis association. The governing body claimed he had refused to play in a Davis Cup tie for Yugoslavia against New Zealand earlier that month. Today tennis players routinely turn down invitations to play for their countries in Davis Cup competition, but back in 1973 it was considered a big no-no--especially in an eastern European country. Pilic denied he had done so. Be that as it may, Pilic was initially suspended for nine months. Yugoslavia's suspension was supported by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF), but it was later reduced to just one month. Nevertheless, that month happened to be when the prestigious Wimbledon championships took place. Thus, Pilic would not be permitted to play at Wimbledon. The recently formed men's players union, the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), stated that if Pilic was not allowed to compete, none of its membership should compete. As a result, 81 of the top players, including reigning champion Stan Smith, boycotted Wimbledon in 1973 to protest Pilic's suspension. The initial seeding for the men's draw had already taken place. Thirteen of the 16 men's seeds withdrew. This resulted in an enormous number of qualifiers and lucky losers getting into the main draw. Three leading ATP players, Ilie Nastase, Roger Taylor and Ray Keldie, defied the boycott and were fined by the ATP's disciplinary committee. Also among those who chose to play were two rising stars: Bjorn Borg and Jimmy Connors, who each advanced to the quarterfinals. Despite the boycott, the attendance of 300,172 was the second highest in Wimbledon's history at that time. The eventual men's champion was Jan Kodes of Czechoslovakia. He defeated Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union 6-1, 9-8, 6-3 in the final. (Tiebreakers were played at 8-8 in those days.) Kodes is shown here planting a kiss on the championship trophy.
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  boycott 
Added: 15th September 2012
Views: 3362
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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