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Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 3903
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Great 1980s commercials A bunch of commercials that aired on NBC on March 25th, 1987. 1. Mounds and Almond Joy (The bars are bigger!) 2. Diet 7up (With John Goodman!) 3. McDonald's (With Happy Meal Stencils! "'Scuse me Daddy!") 4. Promo for "Stone Fox" (Starring Buddy Ebsen) 5. Pampers (Baby Racing: America's greatest sport!) 6. Promo for the "Build A Perfect Cheeseburger" contest (Sponsored by the California Beef and Dairy boards naturally) 7. Diet 7up (Guy reminds me of Larry from "Perfect Strangers") 8. Kraft Rancher's Choice Creamy Salad Dressing 9. Promo for "Roomies" (With Corey Haim!) and "Amazing Stories" (Daddy?) 10. Pepsi (This is probably my favorite commercial ever) 11. 7-Eleven (These low prices make me sad) 12. Teddy Ruxpin (And his pal Grubby) 13. Luvs (What's with all of the diaper advertising?) 14. Pizza Hut Flintstones Kids Glasses (Watch out for the Ginger Kid!) 15. New Coke (With Max Headroom!) 16. Sure Deodorant 17. Pepto Bismol 18. TV Spot for "Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol" (Another 80's comedy classic from Steve Gutenberg) 19. Promo for "Night Court", "The Tortelli's" and "The Bronx Zoo" ("The days of the little red brick schoolhouse are over!" You tell 'em Asner!)
Tags: 1980s  commercials  commercials  80s 
Added: 11th August 2012
Views: 3654
Rating:
Posted By: dusman
1999 Power Rangers The Lost Episode promos Power Rangers "The Lost Episode" promos The best, original Red Ranger: Austin St. John hosts the promos for the "Power Rangers: The Lost Episode" special, which he also hosted, which featured the original previously-unaired pilot version of MMPR's "Day of the Dumpster", which he starred. Ahem. Fox Kids only aired this special once, and notice the strange lack of Walter Jones.
Tags: 1999  Power  Rangers  The  Lost  Episode  promos   
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 1041
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Power Rangers Playback Promos 1998 1999 Power Rangers Playback 1998 1999 R.I.P Fox Kids, ABC Kids, and One Saturday Morning. To be seen again.. Fox Kids was one of the best inventions for tv Kids of the 90's ...Needs to be bought back by Saban and brought back.. Disney screwed it up ? yeah you bet they did.. Saturday mornings was good block too.
Tags: Power  Rangers  Playback  Promos  1998  1999 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 687
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Snick Remember when SNICK Premiered? Nickelodeon at night that isnt Nick At Nite? WHAT! THIS IS AMAZING! The thought process of a 6 year old who just found out that Nickelodeon would be on the air until 10 PM on Saturday nights. This was huge for us kids who werent old enough to go out on Saturdays, and it gave us an excuse to beg our parents to let us stay up late. I mean hey, if Nick is still on, theres no way it too late to go to sleep right? Exactly. What a great bargaining chip by Nickelodeon. I remember it seemed like an eternity before SNICK kicked off. That orange couch still comes to mind every time someone talks about what to do on a Saturday night. Short for Saturday Night Nickelodeon ran from August 15, 1992 until August 28, 2004. (not cool, no reason to cancel such a great block, my guess since they were moving everything to Hollywood, this might have been cause and the fact that they lost good writters for these programs..in the 90's it was done right just like some in the 80's when it came to children's entertainment on Nick, this was the place. Today some are good from the 2000-2010 era- Rocket Power, Wild Thronberry's, Sponge Bob, to name a few. The block debuted on Saturday, August 15, 1992, with a pair of Sunday favorites (the preteen-oriented sitcom Clarissa Explains It All and the Nicktoon The Ren and Stimpy Show) and the network premieres of Roundhouse (a musical comedy variety series) and Are You Afraid of the Dark? (a horror anthology series)Ads and bumpers for SNICK featured the programming block's "mascot," dubbed "The Big Orange Couch," in several locales, including in front of the Midnight Society's campfire, Ren and Stimpy's house, and in various locations. It was retired in June 1999, when the iconic couch, stuffed with $25,000 and 6000 cookies, was given away in a contest celebrating Nickelodeon's 20 years on television. In 2006, one of Nickelodeon's celebrities would take over Nickelodeon from Monday to Friday, sitting on the Big Orange Couch. 1992-1994: 8PM Clarissa Explains It All 8:30PM Roundhouse 9PM The Ren & Stimpy Show 9:30PM Are You Afraid of the Dark? 1993 to mid-Summer 1994: 8PM Clarissa Explains It All 8:30PM The Adventures of Pete & Pete 9PM The Ren & Stimpy Show 9:30PM Are You Afraid of the Dark? 10PM Roundhouse 1994-1996: 8PM The Secret World of Alex Mack 8:30PM All That 9PM The Ren & Stimpy Show 9:30PM Are You Afraid of the Dark? Early 1996-Spring 1996: 8PM The Secret World of Alex Mack 8:30PM All That 9PM Space Cases 9:30PM Are You Afraid of the Dark? Spring 1996-Fall 1996 8PM The Secret World of Alex Mack 8:30PM All That 9PM Space Cases 9:30PM The Adventures of Pete & Pete Fall 1996-Early 1997 8PM Kenan & Kel 8:30PM All That 9PM The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo 9:30PM KaBlam! Early 1997-Fall 1997: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM KaBlam! 1997-1998: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM The Journey of Allen Strange July 11, 1998: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM Nickelodeon Sports Theater with Shaquille O'Neal 1998-1999: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM Animorphs Snick's Live Birthday Party: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM Cousin Skeeter Early 1999-late 1999: 8PM Rugrats 8:30PM All That 9PM Kenan & Kel 9:30PM Are You Afraid of the Dark?
Tags: Snick 
Added: 13th August 2012
Views: 1503
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
1993 Mighty Morphin Power Rangers DVD collection now available Mighty Morphin Power Rangers DVD collection now available
Tags: 1993  Mighty  Morphin  Power  Rangers  DVD  collection  now  available 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 747
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Nickelodeon Commercials December 26 1994 Nickelodeon Commercials December 26, 1994 1. Station ID: Bumper Mish-Mash 2. Nickelodeon On VHS: Rock's Modern Life: "How Can You Tell If Your Dog Is Brainless" 3. Bumper Mish-Mash Reprise 4. Purebred Pet Groomer (I have one of these, if you can believe that.) 5. Station ID: Shooting Star 6. Up Next: Clock: Mr Wizard and Flipper 7. Nick News Year's 95 Promo 8. Discovery Zone 9. Nickelodeon GUTS on SNES 10. Credits Promo: Captain Stimpy: Flipper Is Next 11. Station ID: The First Kids Network 12. DRUGS PSA 13. Power Rangers "Power Coins" (Read: Pogs) at Mcdonalds 14. Christmas Station ID: Snow Globe 15. Nickelodeon Magazine: Spider (Fun Fact: That Issue Does Not Exist. Not With That Cover Anyway.) 16. Nick Days: The First Day of Kwanza 17. Up Next: Clock: Flipper and Bullwinkle's Moose-O-Rama 18. Nick New Year's Resolutions 19. Apple Jacks 94: Camp Leewood 20. Nickelodeon Video: A Christmas Carol (Wait, WHAT?)
Tags: Nickelodeon  Commercials  December  1994 
Added: 18th August 2012
Views: 2754
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Oatmeal Swirlers  when I ate it 1990 or so I believe these came out in 1989, but for the purpose of this article, I remember eating it in the early 1990's. Maybe 1990-1992? The best of the Oatmeal world? The Oatmeal everyone seems to remember, a little commercial launched in the early 90s; General Mills Oatmeal Swirlers. Everyone loved Oatmeal Swirlers, at least everyone that could remember them or does remember them and anyone that had them at one point or another in their lives. This was a brilliant oatmeal, the epitome of fun with food it was an oatmeal that not only came with it's own flavoring you could choose (six different flavors in all) But the flavouring packets were also created in such a way to urge you to cut a single snippet off and use them as drawing implements on your oatmeal creating your own artistic expression upon a steaming bowl of mush. I don't care if it sounds horrible, it wasn't; it was AWESOME. From Tic-Tac-Toe played presumably with your evil alter-ego since I assume you're not going to have another person hovering over your bowl playing a rousing game of Tic-Tac-Toe against you in your oatmeal? To happy faces and pretty much anything else you could fathom or at least manage to draw on your warm gruel with your gel incarnation of artful expression the gel delights were many and plenty. Strawberry, Maple, Brown Sugar, Grape, Orange or Milk Chocolate are the flavours that this came in so far as I can remember, this is purely off a decades old fuzzy memory and at the time I wasn't in the habit of obsessively remembering things such as these because I didn't fathom they'd ever be gone and need to be remembered so don't quote me absolutely on the flavours. Never mind that, I'm right about most of them that much I know and another thing I know is that this was an unbelievably awesome oatmeal that should have never been discontinued but was. If one major product General Mills absolutely needs to bring back it's Oatmeal Swirlers Oatmeal and in that interest, I'm bringing attention to a petition I found online. It's small now but I feel perhaps if we spread this around the retro-sites of the internet maybe we can make a dent, maybe General Mills can be shown reason and the era of the Oatmeal Swirler may once more return to us in it's glorious gooey goodness. Please consider taking part and spreading this around! There is a Pension to bring them back! http://www.change.org/petitions/general-mills-bring-back-the-product-oatmeal-swirlers-instant-oatmeal
Tags: Oatmeal  Swirlers    when  I  ate  it  1990  or  so 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 4478
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2164
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31
Hidden Treasures Cereal from August 1994 Hidden Treasures was a short-lived breakfast cereal by General Mills. Introduced in 1993, alongside Sprinkle Spangles, the cereal consisted of sweetened corn squares that all looked the same, but were meant to be filled with a fruity filling. The icing filling flavors were cherry, orange and grape. To emphasize the treasure hunt dynamic, some pieces had no icing filling, and were hollow. Thanks to the process by which the icing filled pieces were made, clever children would have little difficulty noticing the pattern: pieces with a seam very close to the edge were grape, off-center orange, and directly center seams had cherry. Hidden Treasures was discontinued by 1995. August 1994. I recall these "Treasures" have a gummy jell in the middle of each square. Gotta love the kid rockin the flannel hoodie, so that we know it's is "1994."
Tags: Hidden  Treasures  Cereal  August  1994 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 892
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31

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