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Holy Roller Play 1978 Raiders-Chargers One of the wildest finishes in NFL history occurred in Week #2 of the 1978 season. The Oakland Raiders defeated the San Diego Chargers 21-20 on a dubious touchdown on the last play of the game. Despite two obvious intentional forward fumbles, the play was legal under 1978 NFL rules. After the season the rules were changed to prevent the offensive team from advancing the ball on a fourth-down fumble. This clip shows NBC's coverage of the final drive that led to the infamous "Holy Roller." Jim Simpson calls the play.
Tags: NFL  football  Holy  Roller  Oakland  Raiders 
Added: 18th January 2016
Views: 824
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Posted By: Lava1964
Henry Ford Invents Charcoal Most people realize that Henry Ford was responsible for the assembly line--a groundbreaking factory innovation that made the manufacturing of automobiles (and everything else) go much faster. Few people, however, know that Ford also invented modern charcoal briquets! Amazingly, Ford's auto assembly line led to the development of the blackened fuel chunks. Here's what happened: One day in the 1920s Ford visited his Dearborn automobile plant and was aghast at the amount of wood that was wasted in the manufacture of his Model T cars. Ford found all types of waste to be unacceptable, so he wanted the wood bits left over from his cars' wheels and interiors to be put to a good and profitable use. He figured that since wood chips were highly flammable, they could be used as a handy portable fuel source. He consulted with some chemists and came up with the idea of charcoal pieces suitable for barbecues. Furthermore, they fit in nicely with promotional literature of the era that encouraged American consumers to buy Ford automobiles for peaceful, long drives in the country. What better way to cap off a serene weekend drive than to have a cookout using Ford's charcoal? This photo shows a package of 1920s briquets bearing the familiar Ford logo.
Tags: Henry  Ford  charcoal  inventor 
Added: 11th February 2016
Views: 815
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wall Street Bombing - 1920 One of the least remembered terrorist attacks in American history occurred just past noon on Thursday, September 16, 1920 in the hub of America's financial center--New York City's Wall Street. An unattended horse-drawn wagon loaded with a bomb containing dynamite and 500 pounds of small iron weights was parked in front of 23 Wall Street. The corner building was then the headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co., the nation's most powerful bank. At 12:01 p.m., the timer on the bomb reached zero and a terrific explosion rocked the street. The concussion from the blast was so severe that it derailed a trolley car two blocks away. Several hundred people were injured by flying shrapnel and broken glass falling from the surrounding buildings. There were 38 fatalities--most of whom were not major financial magnates, but average Wall Street employees: clerical staff and messengers on their lunch breaks. Anarchist literature was found nearby threatening violence unless unnamed political prisoners were released. No arrests were ever made in the case, but historians and crime buffs strongly believe the bombing was carried out by an anti-capitalist/anarchist named Mario Buda who fled to Italy shortly after the bombing and stayed there until his death in 1963. Buda apparently was motivated by the arrests of fellow anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti earlier that year for the April 15, 1920 robbery of a Massachusetts shoe factory's payroll in which a security guard was killed. The only two deadlier terrorists attacks on American soil in the 20th century were the Bath School bombing of 1927 and the massive explosion at the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Despite the passage of nearly a century, deep shrapnel marks from the 1920 explosion are still visible on the limestone facade of 23 Wall Street.
Tags: Wall  Street  Bombing  terrorism 
Added: 15th February 2016
Views: 950
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hair Crimper It was all the rage in the 70s!
Tags: Bayliss  Hair  Crimper  Hair  fashion  design  irregular  waves 
Added: 4th April 2016
Views: 829
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Posted By: Cathy
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 862
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ball Night Causes MLB Forfeit - 1995 I bet you didn't know there have been 139 forfeits in Major League Baseball history. The most recent occurred on August 10, 1995 when the Los Angeles Dodgers forfeited a game to the St. Louis Cardinals in the ninth inning. It happened to be "Ball Night" at Dodger Stadium--so the crowd was conveniently armed with free autographed baseballs that had been given out to them when they passed through the turnstiles. Three times the crowd reacted hostilely when calls went against the home team, littering the field with baseballs. With the Dodgers trailing 2-1 in the ninth inning, another barrage of baseballs descended from the seats when Raul Mondesi struck out. (Plate umpire Jim Quick's strike call on the 3-1 pitch was, admittedly, horrible.) Crew chief Bob Davidson had enough of the missiles and terminated the game. Here's ESPN's brief report on what happened.
Tags: forfeit  MLB  Dodgers  Ball  Night 
Added: 1st June 2017
Views: 436
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bing Davdison Tragic Death One of Hollywood's lesser known tragedies was the death of small-time actor James (Bing) Davidson, a 25-year-old Nebraskan who fell to his doom in 1965. Davidson, whose screen credits show just three small roles, was in the company of actor Paul Lynde in San Francisco on July 17, 1965. Lynde was well known to be a heavy drinker; he and Davidson had both heavily imbibed that night. At some point of drunkenness at the Drake Hotel, Davidson decided to demonstrate a daredevil stunt--hanging from a balcony by his fingertips. In full view of several horrified onlookers (and police officers who had been summoned), Davidson lost his grip and fell to his death from the eighth floor of the hotel. Lynde was absolved of any blame, but the incident was hushed up for years as the circumstances surrounding it may have derailed Lynde's acting career.
Tags: Bing  Davidson  fall  Paul  Lynde   
Added: 9th July 2017
Views: 1353
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Posted By: Lava1964
2002 MLB All-Star Game Controversial Tie While the other three major North American team sports' All-Star Games have become farces, baseball's mid-summer classic still retains its luster for being competitive and hard-fought, and unchanged in its format since it was first played in 1933. Since day one it's always been the American League versus the National League. At the 2002 ASG in Milwaukee, however, the game suffered a huge public-relations blow because it was stopped after 11 innings deadlocked at 7-7, when both teams ran out of pitchers. This development was the result of a change in ASG philosophy that strongly encouraged managers to use everyone on the bench. The days of Willie Mays playing in the ASG from start to finish (which he did 11 times) were gone. Instead, managers liberally moved players in and out of the lineup so that it resembled something akin to a softball game at a church picnic where, to avoid hurt feelings, everyone participates. Commissioner Bud Selig made the decision to halt the game in consultation with the umpiring crew and both managers. The crowd of more than 41,000 spectators was outraged that the game ended without a winner. Furthermore, no MVP was selected because of the inconclusive outcome--a strange decision did not make a lot of sense. The following year, as a way to make the contest more meaningful, it was decided that whichever league won the ASG would get home field advantage for the World Series that autumn. That policy, which had its supporters and detractors, was kept until 2016.
Tags: MLB  baseball  2002  All-Star  Game  tie 
Added: 12th July 2017
Views: 287
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scofflaw - Prize-Winning Prohibition Word During America's Prohibition years, violations of the Volstead Act (which outlawed the sale, transportation, and manufacture of alcoholic beverages) were widespread. In 1924, an ardent Massachusetts prohibitionist named Delcevare King offered a $200 prize to anyone who could create a new word that would heap shame the lawless drinkers and those who enabled them. Two entrants--both from Massachusetts--named Henry Dale and Kate Butler each came up with the same winning word: scofflaw. It was clever a combination of the verb scoff (meaning to mock, deride or ridicule) and, of course, law. Dale and Butler split the $200 prize. The word did catch on and, over the years, scofflaw has expanded its meaning to encompass those who willfully break any law--not just liquor statutes.
Tags: Prohibition  scofflaw  contest  lexicography 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 272
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Posted By: Lava1964

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