Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Bomb Destroys CA Flight 11 - 1962 On Tuesday, May 22, 1962 a deadly act of madness caused Continental Airlines Flight #11 to be blown out of the sky. Eight crew members and 37 passengers perished. To date it is the worst airline disaster ever to occur in the skies over Missouri. The doomed flight departed Chicago's O'Hare Airport at 8:35 p.m. for Kansas City, MO. At the last second, Thomas G. Doty arrived at the departure gate. Although the airplane doors had been closed--and airline policy prohibits doors from being reopened--the doors were improperly reopened and Doty was permitted to board the aircraft. The flight was absolutely routine until the plane approached the Mississippi River. At that point the pilot informed air traffic control that he was deviating from the planned course to avoid severe thunderstorms in the area. In the vicinity of Centerville, IA, the radar image of the aircraft suddenly disappeared from the scope of Flight Following Service in Waverly, IA. It had nothing to do with inclement weather. At approximately 9:17 p.m. an explosion occurred in the right rear lavatory resulting in separation of the airplane's tail section from the fuselage. The remaining aircraft structure pitched nose-down violently, causing the engines to tear off, after which it fell into uncontrollable gyrations. The fuselage of the Boeing 707, minus the aft 38 feet, and with part of the left and most of the right wing intact, struck an alfalfa field on the ground. Most of the fuselage was found near Unionville, MO, but the engines and parts of the tail section and left wing were found up to six miles away from the main wreckage area. Of the 45 individuals on board, 44 were already dead when rescuers reached the crash site. One passenger, 27-year-old Takehiko Nakano of Evanston, IL, was barely alive when rescuers found him among the wreckage, but he later succumbed to fatal internal injuries. Another victim, Fred P. Herman, was a recipient of the United States Medal of Freedom. In their investigation of the crash, FBI agents discovered that late-arriving passenger Thomas G. Doty, a married man with a five-year-old daughter, had purchased a life insurance policy from Mutual of Omaha for $150,000, the maximum available. He further augmented that coverage with a flight insurance policy worth another $150,000 that he purchased just before departure. Doty had recently been arrested for armed robbery and was to soon face a preliminary hearing in the matter. Investigators determined that Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite--at 29 cents apiece--shortly before the flight. An examination of the wreckage determined that Doty's dynamite bomb was detonated in the lavatory. His motive was purely financial: His wife and daughter would be able to collect $300,000 of life insurance. His widow attempted to collect on the insurance, but when Doty's death was ruled a suicide, the policies were voided.
Tags: crime  bomb  air  disaster  Flight  11 
Added: 15th December 2015
Views: 1528
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Comic Book Mail Order Mysteries Tags: Comic  Book  Mail  Order  Mysteries  hypno  coin  toys  hovwercraft  x-ray  vision  100  toy  soilders   
Added: 9th January 2016
Views: 1086
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 600
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace

Pages: 2 3 4 5 6 7 [8] of 8 | Random