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Holmes and Yo-Yo - Sitcom Flop 1976 Holmes & Yo-Yo was a disastrous, far-fetched sitcom that aired on ABC for 13 episodes during the 1976-1977 season. The series followed luckless Detective Alexander Holmes (whose partners always seem to get killed in the line of duty) and his new android partner Yo-Yo, on their adventures and misadventures. Meanwhile Holmes taught Yo-Yo how to be human while trying to keep his quirky partner's true nature a secret. The show was produced by Leonard Stern, a former staff writer for Get Smart--which featured an android character named Hymie who was a prototype for Yo-Yo. Richard B. Shull starred as Detective Holmes. John Schuck starred as his partner Gregory "Yo-Yo" Yoyonivich. Co-stars were Andrea Howard and Bruce Kirby. Jay Leno appeared in the pilot as a gas station attendant! The pilot episode introduced Detective Holmes as a down-on-his-luck veteran cop who constantly injures his partners. The department gives him a new partner, Gregory Yoyonivich. Yo-Yo, as he likes to be called, is good-natured, if a bit clumsy, and also surprisingly strong. During one of their first calls, Yo-Yo is shot and Holmes discovers his new partner is an android--a sophisticated new crime-fighting machine designed by the police department as their secret weapon on crime. "You're not a person!" is Holmes' stunned response. Besides super-strength, Yo-Yo's other abilities were speed reading, and the ability to analyze clues at the scene. Yo-Yo had a built-in Polaroid camera: Each time his nose was pressed, a Polaroid photograph of his view would be taken and ejected from his shirt pocket. Yo-Yo's control panel was built into his chest, which could be opened by pulling his tie. The level of Yo-Yo's batteries was critical, because if they ran down his memory and, effectively, his being would be erased. In one episode his batteries came very close to running down completely, and he was charged by being pushed against an electric fence with his arms extended. Yo-Yo weighed 427 pounds, and his heavy build could absorb the shock of a bomb. Much comedy was derived from Yo-Yo's constant malfunctions. Some of his common problems included uncontrollably spinning head over heels when near an electric garage door that was opening or closing; bullets causing him to break out dancing; magnets flying at him; picking up radio signals from Sweden; and repeating "Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad, Bunco Squad" over and over when his circuits blew. Another running gag involved Yo-Yo's ability to read an entire book by simply fanning its pages; his invariable comment after doing so: "I enjoyed it!" The show premiered in September 1976 and was axed before Christmas.
Tags: Holmes  and  Yo-Yo  sitcom  ABC  flop 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 1710
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Posted By: Lava1964
1964 No More Dial Phones Found in the February 1964 Seventeen magazine is a look at the Worlds Fair in NYC and the NEW telephones which are now push button instead of dial. There's even talk of new speaker phone telephones!
Tags: 1964  SeventeenMagazine  fashions  teens  WorldsFair    touchtone  telephones 
Added: 4th September 2011
Views: 1879
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Death of Tyrone Power - 1958 Tyrone Power was one of Hollywood's most popular actors from his debut in 1936 until the time of his untimely death in 1958. In 1957, the twice-divorced Power met Deborah Ann Montgomery Minardos. They were married on May 7, 1958, just after Power's 44th birthday. She became pregnant soon afterward. In September 1958, Power and his wife travelled to Madrid and Valdespartera, Spain to film Solomon and Sheba under the direction of King Vidor. Deborah Ann was worried about Tyrone's health and asked him to slow down, but he pushed ahead with the movie. He had filmed about 75 percent of his scenes when he was stricken with a massive heart attack while he was filming a strenuous dueling scene with his frequent co-star and friend, George Sanders. He died en route to the hospital. Yul Brynner was hastily brought in to take over Power's role of Solomon. The filmmakers used some of the long shots that Power had filmed, and an observant fan can see him in some of the scenes, particularly in the middle of the duel. Power's last role was a familiar one, with sword in hand. He is perhaps best remembered as a swashbuckler, and, indeed, he was reportedly one of the finest swordsmen in Hollywood. Director Henry King said, "People always seem to remember Ty with sword in hand, although he once told me he wanted to be a character actor. He actually was quite good among the best swordsmen in films." Power was buried at Hollywood Forever Cemetery at noon on November 21, 1958, in a military service. (This is a photo of his grave marker.) His son, Tyrone Power Jr., was born on January 22, 1959.
Tags: death  Tyrone  Power  actor 
Added: 26th May 2012
Views: 4307
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Posted By: Lava1964
Push Pop Commercial 1993 Now Now, keep dirty thoughts out of your head on this one people...
Tags: Push  Pop  Commercial  1993 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 1065
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Posted By: masonx31
Design For Leaving - 1953 One of the great Warner Bros. cartoons: Design For Leaving (1953). Pushy salesman Daffy Duck turns Elmer Fudd's house into a futuristic push-button mess.
Tags: cartoon  Elmer  Fudd  Daffy  Duck  Warner  Bros 
Added: 10th October 2012
Views: 1465
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Posted By: Lava1964
1989 PSA - Partnership for a Drug-Free America Get a fix on your kids, Before the pushers do?
Tags: Drug  Free  America  1989  PSA  Public  Service  Announcement  Partnership  Pushers  Crack 
Added: 21st November 2012
Views: 1018
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Posted By: poundsdwayne47
1960s Sexist Xerox Commercial Vapid secretary is indispensable to her boss because she knows how to push the on button on a Xerox machine. It produces--gasp!--seven copies per minute!
Tags: Xerox  commercial  sexism 
Added: 4th December 2012
Views: 2294
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Posted By: Lava1964
Youve Got Mail - Final Scene Ah, nothing beats a happy ending. This is the final scene of the 1998 Tom Hanks-Meg Ryan romantic film You've Got Mail. It's a modernized remake of a 1940 Jimmy Stewart-Margaret Sullivan film, The Shop Around The Corner, in which the lovers were pen pals. Set at a time when email was a novelty, Joe Fox (Hanks) and Kathleen Kelly (Ryan) begin a romance over the Internet without meeting one another. Complicating matters is that Fox's enormous bookstore chain is slowly pushing the small, beloved, family-owned bookstore founded by Kelly's late mother out of business. They despise each other, of course. An arranged meeting falls apart when Fox, who goes by the handle NY152, realizes his Internet love, whom he knows as Shopgirl, is Kelly. He does not divulge his identity to her, but the two slowly become dear friends once Kelly's shop is forced to close its doors. Fox sneakily and lovingly puts Kelly through the wringer before arranging another meeting at a New York City park. The final scene begins with Kelly awaiting the arrival of NY152 and realizing her Internet sweetheart is Fox.
Tags: Youve  Got  Mail  Tom  Hanks  Meg  Ryan 
Added: 16th December 2013
Views: 1125
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Posted By: Lava1964
National Lampoon 1970 -1998 National Lampoon was an irreverent, ground-breaking American humor magazine. Its success led to a wide range of media productions associated with the magazine's brand name. The magazine ran from 1970 to 1998. It was originally a spinoff of the Harvard Lampoon. The magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor. It spawned films, radio, live theatre, various kinds of recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine went on to contribute to successful media of all types. During the magazine's most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed "True Facts"), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included "Foto Funnies" or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, and crass, bawdy frat house jesting. National Lampoon's humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. Co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: "There was this big door that said, 'Thou shalt not.' We touched it, and it fell off its hinges." The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally. (In 1992, for instance, only one issue was published.) It ceased publication altogether in 1998.
Tags: National  Lampoon 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 1094
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Posted By: Lava1964
1980s Classroom Videos True, it was always a great day when you teacher came in from the hallway to your classroom pushing one of these through the door...
Tags: classroom  video  1980s  teacher 
Added: 12th November 2013
Views: 1138
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Posted By: dusman

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