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Willie and Joe Perhaps some of you may remember "Willie and Joe." The two World War II infantry grunts created by Bill Mauldin. His famous infantrymen cartoons were featured in "Stars and Stripes," the American soldier's newspaper. The cartoons would depict life as the average American soldier would live it during wartime. Some were comical, others brought home the ugliness and tragedies of war. He didn't get along very well with most officers because would poke fun at them in his cartoons. This would irritate the younger officers and some older ones alike. Gen. George Patton wanted him to stop drawing his cartoons but apparently the morale of the American soldier and the popularity of the cartoons and the good effect that "Willie and Joe" had on it won out even over the General's wishes. These two cartoons came from the first collection of his work compiled in a book alled, "Up Front," which was a best-seller. At age 23 he won the Pulitzer Prize. That was in 1945. He was assigned to the 45th infantry division, and was wounded by a shell fragment in Anzio for which he receive the Purple Heart. He also made the cover of Time Magazine in 1958. Bill passed away in 2003 at the age of 81. Bill Mauldin was a great American!
Tags: willie  joe  wwii  bill  mauldin  stars  strpes  cartoons 
Added: 17th September 2007
Views: 3259
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Posted By: jimmyjet
Ill think About That Tomorrow Scarlett: Oh, Ashley…Ashley…I love you! Ashley: Scarlett! Scarlett: I love you, I do! Ashley: Well, isn’t it enough that you’ve gathered every other man’s heart today? You’ve always had mine; you cut your teeth on it…
Tags: film  Gone  With  The  Wind  Margaret  Mitchell  Pulitzer  Prize  1937  Pulitzer  Prize  in  1937  Vivien  Leigh  Clark  Gable  Leslie  Howard  Olivia  de  Havilland  Hattie  McDaniel 
Added: 26th October 2007
Views: 1700
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Posted By: Teresa
German Children of Charles Lindbergh In 1927, Charles Lindbergh, a virtualy unknown air mail pilot from Minnesota, became a worldwide celebrity with his daring solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean. He remained a beloved American hero until the onset of the Second World War when his isolationist views thinly disguised an admiration for Nazi Germany. Twenty-nine years after Lindbergh died in 1974, Lindbergh's reputation took another beating. It was revealed he had fathered at least seven children with three German mistressess during his many trips abroad in the 1950s and 1960s. In 2003 three of them, the children of Brigitte Hesshaimer, produced 112 letters Lindbergh had written to their mother along with childhood photographs with the famed aviator and their own recollections of the tall, lanky man who they knew as Careau Kent. DNA tests conclusively proved they were Lindbergh's children. The Hesshaimer children, born between 1958 and 1967, said they didn't realize Lindbergh was their father until the early 1980s when Bouteuil, the middle child, began asking questions. After discovering a bundle of letters allegedly written by Lindbergh and addressed to her mother, Bouteuil confronted her and was finally told that Kent was actually Lindbergh. The children promised to keep the secret until both their mother and Lindbergh's widow, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, were deceased. Both died in 2001. The revelation stunned Lindbergh's Pulitzer-prize winning biographer, A. Scott Berg, who told the Associated Press when the siblings made their claim, it would have been "out of character for Lindbergh to father the siblings." The Hesshaimers say Lindbergh met their mother, a Munich hatmaker, and fell in love in the mid-1950s when he spent much of his time traveling. Lindbergh would visit the family once or twice a year when the children were young, staying for five days to two weeks, Dyrk Hesshaimer said, and their mother forbade them from discussing their father outside of the family. “We quickly built up a close relationship to him,” he said. “We didn't have the time together with him that other children had with their fathers, but when he was there he concentrated very intensively on us.” Bouteil recalled breakfasts where her mother and Lindbergh would talk for hours, and of the people he'd met. “I knew he was something special,” Dyrk Hesshaimer said. “He had knowledge about U.S. politics that wasn't in the news at the time.” Their mother received what would be her final letter dated Aug. 16, 1974. It read, “I am losing energy everyday. My love to you and the children, all I can send.” Brigitte Hesshaimer later read in the papers that Lindbergh had died of cancer on Aug. 26, 1974 She told her children simply that their father was dead. Subsequent research by German investigators found that Lindbergh had fathered four other children with two other German women.
Tags: Charles  Linbdergh  paternity  scandal 
Added: 22nd December 2013
Views: 1847
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pulitzer Prize-Nominated Sports Photo The agony of defeat! This is one of the great sports photos ever taken. The despondent baseball player hiding his face is Brooklyn Dodgers' pitcher Ralph Branca who had just surrendered Bobby Thomson's famous home run that gave the New York Giants the 1951 National League pennant. The other Dodger is Cookie Lavagetto.
Tags: baseball  photo  Ralph  Branca 
Added: 13th August 2009
Views: 3535
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alex Haley Plagiarism Scandal 1978 In 1978, Alex Haley, the renowned author of Roots, came under fire in a plagiarism lawsuit launched by a white anthropologist and fellow author Harold Courlander. Haley claimed he had spent a decade researching his heritage for his historical novel, which in 1977 was adapted as a wildly successful TV miniseries. That same year he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the Spingarn Medal for the book. A year later his reputation was forever marred. Courlander went to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York to charge that Roots was substantially plagiarized from Courlander's own book, The African. Courlander's witnesses included Michael Wood an English professor at Columbia University and an expert on plagiarism. Wood opined in a report that the evidence of plagiarism in Roots was 'clear and irrefutable' and that the copying of passages was 'significant and extensive.' After a five-week trial in federal district court, Courlander and Haley settled the case, with Haley making a financial settlement of $650,000 and a statement that 'Alex Haley acknowledges and regrets that various materials from The African by Harold Courlander found their way into his book Roots.' Haley claimed the appropriation of Courlander's passages had been unintentional. Haley orginally maintained he had never heard of The African, much less read it. Shortly after the trial, however, Joseph Bruchac, an instructor of black literature at Skidmore College, came forward to swear in an affidavit that in 1970 or 1971--five or six years before the publication of Roots--he had discussed The African with Haley and had given his 'own personal copy of The African to Haley.' In a later interview with BBC Television, Judge Ward stated, 'Alex Haley perpetrated a hoax on the public.'
Tags: Roots  Alex  Haley  plagiarism  scandal 
Added: 4th February 2010
Views: 14606
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Posted By: Lava1964

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