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Vanishing TV Character - Warren Ferguson For five memorable seasons of The Andy Griffith Show, Don Knotts superbly played Barney Fife, sheriff Andy Taylor's well-intentioned but inept deputy. Deputy Fife was such a beloved character that anyone who attempted to replace him would have a difficult task. Knotts opted to pursue a movie career at the end of the 1964-65 TV season and left the TAGS cast. His replacement was comedian Jack Burns who was cast as deputy Warren Ferguson. Ferguson was the nephew of town barber Floyd Lawson. He was a recent graduate of a police academy who zealously enforced Mayberry's statutes. (In one episode he raided a ladies' club bingo game.) Ferguson is best remembered for his grating habit of punctuating his monologues with the word "Huh?". He was also bungling, but nowhere near as popular as Barney Fife. After just 11 episodes, deputy Ferguson vanished without explanation. He was never seen or even mentioned again. Sheriff Taylor never had another regular deputy throughout the rest of the series (which ended in 1968).
Tags: Jack  Burns  Warren  Ferguson  TAGS 
Added: 1st February 2019
Views: 647
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Rover Boys - Book Series The Rover Boys, or The Rover Boys Series for Young Americans, was a popular juvenile literature series authored by Arthur M. Winfield, a pseudonym for Edward Stratemeyer. Thirty titles were first published between 1899 and 1926. The original Rover Boys were brothers Tom, Sam, and Dick Rover. Their children (Fred, son of Sam Rover; Jack, son of Dick; Andy and Randy, twin sons of Tom) became the main characters of the shorter "second series" that began with Volume 21, The Rover Boys at Colby Hall, published in 1917. The elder Rovers continued making appearances in the second series. The Rovers were students at a military boarding school. They were adventurous, prank-playing, flirtatious, and often unchaperoned adolescents who were frequently causing mischief for authorities as well as criminals. The series often incorporated novel technology of the era, such as the automobile, airplanes (The Rover Boys in the Air) and news events, such as World War I. Although the last installment of the series was published in 1926, the whole Rover Boys series stayed in print for years afterward.
Tags: juvenile  literature  Rover  Boys 
Added: 10th November 2016
Views: 969
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Posted By: Lava1964
Flo - Sitcom Spinoff Disaster The popular CBS sitcom Alice, which ran from 1976 to 1985, was loosely based on the successful 1974 film Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. The plot had recently widowed Alice Hyatt (played by Linda Lavin) taking a waitress job in Mel's Diner, a Phoenix eatery, to make ends meet. One of her waitress colleagues was feisty Florence (Flo) Castleberry played by Polly Holliday. The character became so popular that CBS launched a sitcom focusing on Flo. The premise of the spinoff was that Flo had moved back home to Cowtown, Texas to assume the management of a rundown roadhouse which she re-christened Flo's Yellow Rose. As a mid-season replacement, Flo aired on Monday nights in March and April 1980 and got as high as number seven in the Neilsen ratings. However, when Flo returned in the fall of 1980 its time slot was moved several times. Ratings tanked and it was gone after a total of 29 episodes. The Flo character never returned to Alice (with the exception of old clips in the series finale). Here is the opening montage of Flo.
Tags: Flo  CBS  sitcom  spinoff  Alice 
Added: 10th July 2017
Views: 836
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Art Carney Whats My Line Parody What's My Line fans will enjoy this! From 1959 to 1961 Art Carney hosted several comedy specials. Most people generally do not realize how gifted Carney was in doing impersonations. In this clip from a special that aired in December 1959, the popular panel show What's My Line is parodied by Carney--who does a terrific exaggeration of WML host John Daly.
Tags: Art  Carney  WML  parody 
Added: 11th July 2018
Views: 765
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Cheers - Death of Eddie Lebec Jay Thomas, who appeared as Eddie Lebec in nine episodes of the TV sitcom Cheers, died from cancer on August 24, 2017 at the age of 69. On Cheers, Lebec was a French-Canadian goalie for the Boston Bruins whom Carla (Rhea Perlman) meets while he is riding a hot streak. However, as soon as Eddie and Carla start dating, he slumps badly. (To thwart the jinx, Eddie and Carla continue to date, but they go through a 'breakup' ritual before every game.) The Eddie Lebec character was popular, so the show's writers decided to have Carla and Eddie marry. However, Thomas, who hosted a radio show, got himself into hot water one day when a caller innocently asked him what it was like to be a Cheers cast member. The irrepressible Tomas replied, Its brutal. I have to kiss Rhea Perlman. Perlman happened to be listening to the broadcast--and Thomas never made another appearance on Cheers. The show's writers had to come up with a way to drop Eddie Lebec from the show. In his final episode on Cheers, Eddie's hockey career was over so he had gotten a job in an ice show as a skating penguin. The writers came up with the memorable idea of killing Eddie off in a Zamboni accident in an episode cleverly titled "Death Takes a Holiday on Ice." (The premise is quite ridiculous: Have you ever seen how slowly a Zamboni moves? Its design makes it almost impossible for a Zamboni to run over anyone.) Despite the absurdity of the plot twist, Cheers fans loved it. Eddie's death also led to a further plot development: At Eddie's funeral it was revealed that he was a bigamist whose second wife was strikingly similar to Carla! According to writer Ken Levine, this idea worked well as it made Eddie look like a heel, thus viewers were happy he was no longer part of the show.
Tags: Jay  Thomas  Eddie  Lebec  Cheers 
Added: 27th August 2017
Views: 889
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Chris Carmichael After I Love Lucy and the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour ended in 1960, Lucille Ball took a two-year hiatus from television before returning in The Lucy Show in October 1962. This sitcom--loosely based on the book Life Without George--had Ball playing Lucy Carmichael, the widowed mother of two children who shared a large home in fictitious Danfield, NY with divorced friend Vivan Bagley (Vivian Vance). Bagley had a young son as well, named Sherman. Lucy's late husband had left her a significant trust fund on which to live. However, her banker kept tight control of the estate. Lucy's attractive teenage daughter, Chris, was played by Candy Moore. (Moore's first noteworthy TV appearance came in a 1961 episode of Leave It To Beaver where she played Margie Manners, the pretty daughter of the Cleavers' occasional housekeeper. The plot had Wally smitten with her.) The first Lucy Show episode focused on Lucy badly coping with Chris going on a date with a boy who owns a car. Despite living in the same home as Lucy, Chris appeared in just 39 of the 84 episodes in the sitcom's first three seasons. She only appeared in seven of the 26 episodes in the third season. Nevertheless, Moore was often featured in teen magazines. The Lucy Show was an enormous hit, finishing fourth in the year-end Nielsen ratings in its first season. After the first two seasons, however, Vivian Vance tired of commuting from her home on the east coast to California to do the show. When it became apparent that Vance was going to quit the show after the third season, the entire premise of the sitcom changed. Beginning in the fourth season, Lucy relocated to Los Angeles to be near where Chris was attending college. Also relocating to LA was banker Theodore J. Mooney (Gale Gordon) who, by a remarkable coincidence, had accepted a position at Lucy's new bank. The trust fund was only mentioned in the first episode of Season #4 and Lucy became a secretary at her bank. It was explained that Vivian had remarried and remained in Danfield. Chris was never seen again. (Lucy's son, Jerry, appeared in just two episodes of Season #4 and was written out of the show before Season #5. The plot had Jerry enrolling in a military school.) It was later revealed that CBS wanted to retain Candy Moore on the revised show because of her popularity with young viewers, but Lucy was adamantly opposed. In fact, Lucy threatened to retire over the issue. Moore appeared in nine episodes of the Donna Reed Show and then acted only sporadically thereafter. She did have a small role in Raging Bull in 1980, but Moore's last acting credit came in 1981. According to various sources, Moore, who turned 71 in 2018, became an English teacher at a dramatic school in Los Angeles.
Tags: Candy  Moore  Chris  Carmichael  Lucy  Show 
Added: 7th January 2018
Views: 945
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Helen Wills - Tennis Champion Tennis player Helen Wills (later Helen Wills Moody), a California girl, captured the U.S. National Championship at Forest Hills at age 17 in 1923--the second-youngest female to manage the feat at that time. In an era when male sportswriters believed that being a female sports champion and being a beauty were incompatible, Wills proved them wrong. Wills' natural good looks turned heads wherever she played and won. She won often. The fact that Wills captured 19 Grand Slam singles tiles between 1923 and 1938 also enhanced her popularity. One writer said of Wills that "every male between the age of six and 60 was a little bit in love with her." In a six-year period from 1927 to 1933, Wills won every singles match she played without dropping a set! Standing about 5'7" with a muscular frame, Wills rarely showed emotion on the court and was dubbed Miss Poker Face. The nickname was coined by a New York sports journalist named Ed Sullivan. (Yes--that Ed Sullivan!) Charlie Chaplin, an avid tennis fan and a fan of attractive women, said the most beautiful thing on Earth was watching Helen Wills play tennis. Wills struck the ball with great power from an irregular stance: Her body faced forward rather than to the side when she made contact with the ball. Late in her life, Wills was asked if the modern, larger-faced racquets would have improved her game, she said, "No, I always struck the ball in the middle of my racquet, so I don't think a larger size racquet would have made any difference." Wills lived to be 92 years old, passing away on New Year's Day 1998.
Tags: tennis  Helen  Willis 
Added: 19th April 2018
Views: 786
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Posted By: Lava1964
10cc - I 'I'm Mandy, Fly Me' by Eric, Graham and Lol begins with the hook-line from 'Clockwork Creep' (on second album 'Sheet Music') and an airplane flying overhead before being swiped aside by a fat bass line, exotic synthesiser sound effects, a vocoder apparently whispering 'amazing grace' and whistling. We find out later that the airplane has crash-landed in the water, with the narrator thrown out of the plane (his first line is that he's 'on the outside looking in') but rather than sound petrified or angry, the narrator bobbing in the water is ecstatic. The poster he sees on the side of the aircraft, of an air-hostess named Mandy, 'with a smile as bright as sunshine' causes him to hallucinate (or so it seems) and takes him out of himself ('The world was spinning like a ball, and then it wasn't there at all!') Mandy gives him the 'kiss of life' that saves him, his addled brain setting off on a journey of exotic acoustic guitars and psychedelic effects that ends only when he's pulled from the wreckage; he asks for Mandy but she's not there. A love song to an imaginary person, created by a situation so intense and extreme that the 'real essence' of life comes into sharp contrast, 'Mandy' is balancing a lot of things for a humble catchy single. For a start we don't know who to believe: the narrator is clearly awake enough to realise that what's happening to him seems like a film (Mandy acts 'just like the girl in Dr No, no no no') and yet when he tells his rescuers later that it might have all been in his head they tell him 'no no no no' and that she was was real, yet currently missing - do they mean this? Or is that simply a ruse to keep him awake and conscious in the hope that the pair might be reunited? (note the sheer amount of denies in each of those two lines, the sort of things you do when you're lying to someone). The key line of this song is 'if your chance would you take it?' - would you be prepared to create a whole new life for yourself in your mind to keep yourself alive? And if you did, what would happen to you afterwards when you realised you were making it all up? It's interesting in this context that the band chose an 'air hostess' as their 'exotic woman' (the first in a whole sequence of imaginary confident Eric Stewart girls who'll end up seducing him on subways and all sorts in albums to come): air hostesses never seem quite real anyway, what with all that make-up and being made up to look the same. This clearly isn't a 'real' woman: she's the sort you see everywhere if you travel by plane a lot and even that name - Mandy - isn't a common one amongst 'real' people, though it's used a lot in books. The result is a fourth straight song in a row that's easy to admire and yet there's something difficult to fall in love with compared to earlier classic 10cc singles: there's too many questions and not enough answers for this to be an 'easy ride', with the sudden switch of gears every time the band break out for another instrumental making this song less easy on the ears than, say, 'I'm Not In Love' or 'Rubber Bullets'. Still, this is a lot of people's favourite 10cc song for a reason: its a love song told with such a radical twist that no one on first hearing could have heard it coming (if they'd understood it at all), traditionally loved by 'true' fans (although interestingly co-writer Lol Creme wasn't one of them; it was this song he quoted as evidence that the band were growing stale). In actuality 'Mandy' is a clever hybrid of catchy commercialism and bonkers uniqueness that couldn't possibly have been thought up by another band, but there are better mixtures of the same ingredients around, even on this same album.
Tags: 10cc,  Pop  Music,  Rock  Music,  1976 
Added: 11th August 2018
Views: 602
Rating:
Posted By: Maitlandsplace
Vanishing TV Character- Larry Mondello Robert (Rusty) Stevens played Larry Mondello in 67 episodes of the first three seasons of Leave It To Beaver between 1957 and 1960. That meant he appeared in approximately 2/3 of those 102 shows. Larry was Beaver's best buddy. Good-natured, obese, but not the brightest kid on the planet, Larry often led Beaver into various messes. We never saw Larry's father, but his harried mother (played by Madge Blake) was constantly threatening Larry with the consequences of his iron-fisted pop laying down the law on him once he got home from another business trip. After the 1959-60 season, however, Larry just vanished from the sitcom. According to some reports, Rusty Stevens' father took a job in Pennsylvania. Thus the Stevens family was suddenly uprooted from California, which effectively ended Rusty's TV career. However, a few reports--including comments made by Barbara Billingsley (who played June Cleaver) late in her life--indicate that Stevens' mother was an insufferable stage mom whose presence and antics rankled the producers. Eventually the brains behind the show had had enough of her and decided abruptly to drop Larry Mondello from the show.
Tags: Larry  Mondello  Leave  It  to  Beaver  Rusty  Stevens 
Added: 26th October 2018
Views: 662
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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