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Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2894
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kitty Genovese murder 1964 It was one of the most infamous murders in American history--not for the murder itself, but for the apparent apathy of people who presumably could have intervened to stop it. Twenty-eight year-old Kitty Genovese was returning home from her job as manager of a Hollis, New York sports bar in the early hours of March 13, 1964. She parked her red Fiat about 100 yards from her Queens, New York apartment building. Winston Moseley, a black man with no criminal record who later stated he just wanted to kill a woman, chased Genovese for a short distance, caught her, and began stabbing her repeatedly with a knife. Genovese screamed for help. One neighbor shouted, 'Leave that girl alone!' Moseley initially left the crime scene. Genovese, seriously wounded, crawled to her apartment building, but Moseley returned ten minutes later, stabbed her several more times, and sexually assaulted her. The brutal ordeal lasted for about 30 minutes. Only after Moseley left did anyone summon the police. Genovese was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital. Two weeks after she died, a scathing New York Times story (from which this photo was taken) claimed that 38 people saw or heard the assault but did nothing. Subsequent investigations into the crime claim that number was greatly exaggerated, but no fewer than 12 people probably had the opportunity to call police. One neighborhood resident preferred to drown out Genovese's screams by turning up the volume on his radio. Another, a recent immigrant from France, said she was reluctant to call the police because her English was not very good. The phrase, 'I don't want to get involved,' became synonymous with the case. Moseley was eventually caught and confessed to Genovese's murder and two others. He was originally sentenced to death, but his sentence was later reduced to life imprisonment. He once told a parole board that he had written the Genovese family a letter to apologize for the 'inconvenience' of having killed Kitty. In one interview with a parole board, Moseley tried to portray himself as the 'real victim' because he was being punished for decades while Kitty's ordeal was relatively short! Moseley's 13th attempt at obtaining parole was denied in March 2008.
Tags: Kitty  Genovese  murder   
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2450
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Posted By: Lava1964
Little Rock desegregation 1957 This is another iconic image of the 50s segregation period. Elizabeth Eckford is one of the African American students known as the Little Rock Nine. On September 4, 1957, she and eight other African American students attempted to enter Little Rock Central High School, which had previously only accepted white students. They were stopped at the door by Arkansas National Guard troops called up by Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus. They tried again without success to attend Central High on September 23, 1957. The next day, September 24, President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent U.S. Army troops to accompany the Little Rock Nine to school for protection. The thing is she is not the subject of the photograph. Will Counts, the photographer shot Hazel Massery, the white girl shouting in front of the man. 40 years later she apologized to Elisabeth...
Tags: photo  Little  Rock,  Arkansas  Elizabeth  Eckford  Hazel  Massey  Will  Counts 
Added: 2nd December 2007
Views: 2074
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Posted By: Teresa
The Catch Willie Mays famous catch in the Polo Grounds in the 1954 World Series
Tags:  
Added: 2nd December 2007
Views: 2754
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Posted By: cheo3011
Father of John Dillinger Speaks Out The father of 'public enemy number one,' John Dillinger, apologizes for his son's criminal behavior in this 1933 interview. The elder Dillinger is certain his wayward boy would 'go straight' if given the chance. Uh huh.
Tags: John  Dillinger 
Added: 24th December 2007
Views: 1409
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jackie Gleason Game Show Flop On January 20, 1961 a game show called You're In The Picture, hosted by Jackie Gleason, debuted on CBS. It was a disaster and the TV critics savaged it. The next week, instead of hosting the game show, Gleason appeared on the air to apologize for 'the bomb.' This time the critics loved Gleason's candor and praised him! This clip shows about a minute of Gleason explaining the game show's rules on January 20 and about eight minutes of his apology from January 27.
Tags: Jackie  Gleason  game  show 
Added: 22nd May 2008
Views: 9251
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Posted By: Lava1964
I apologize Great tune!
Tags: anita  baker 
Added: 1st April 2008
Views: 1156
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Posted By: roseanns1
Look Homeward Angel A month or so ago I posted this song by The Monarchs, whom I thought had first released it in the 60's, but it was actually released in 1957 by one of my early favorite's Johnnie Ray (yes I'm deeply ashamed and apologize for my apparent loss of memory cells). It was charted at #36 on the Billboard Hot 100 in January of '57. This is how this song should sound...
Tags: look  homeward  angel  johnnie  ray  50s  music 
Added: 18th May 2008
Views: 1628
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Posted By: Naomi
Notre Dame Four Horsemen 1924 Notre Dame defeated Army 13-7 in a college football game on October 18, 1924. Grantland Rice of the New York Herald-Tribune began his eloquent report this way: 'Outlined against a blue-grey October sky, the Four Horsemen rode again. In dramatic lore they are known as famine, pestilence, destruction and death. These are only aliases. Their real names are Stuhldreher, Miller, Crowley and Layden. They formed the crest of the South Bend cyclone before which another fighting Army team was swept over the precipice at the Polo Grounds this afternoon as 55,000 spectators peered down upon the bewildering panorama spread out upon the green plain below.' Rice's article was terrific, but what really made Notre Dame's Four Horsemen famous was this photograph. Once the victorious Irish arrived back on campus, team publicity man George Strickler posed Harry Stuhldreher, Don Miller, Jim Crowley, and Elmer Layden atop horses borrowed from a local livery stable. The photograph was widely circulated and Notre Dame's 1924 backfield became legendary.
Tags: Notre  Dame  Four  Horsemen 
Added: 16th June 2008
Views: 2186
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Polo Grounds The Polo Grounds was the home stadium for baseball's New York Giants from 1883 to 1957. There were actually four stadiums that were called The Polo Grounds. This is the last and most famous. Its horseshoe shape created some odd dimensions. The foul lines ran for a mere 257 feet but the the distant center field bleachers were 505 feet away from home plate. This ballpark was where Willie Mays made his spectacular catch during the 1954 World Series and where Bobby Thomson hit baseball's most famous home run in 1951. Oh, yes: The first stadium was built for polo in 1876, but after the Giants acquired it for baseball in 1883, no polo matches were ever played there again.
Tags: Polo  Grounds  baseball 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1469
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Posted By: Lava1964

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